UFC Fight Night 112 medical suspensions: Chiesa, Boetsch, Herrig get 180-day terms

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Six fighters from Sunday’s UFC Fight Night 112 event face mandatory medical suspensions that could stretch up to six months.

MMAjunkie today requested and obtained the list of suspensions from the Oklahoma State Athletic Commission, which oversaw the event.

UFC Fight Night 112 took place at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Okla., and the main card aired on FS1 following prelims on FS2 and UFC Fight Pass.

Headliner Michael Chiesa (14-3 MMA, 7-3 UFC), who suffered a controversial first-round submission loss to lightweight Kevin Lee (16-2 MMA, 9-2 UFC), was among the fighters receiving 180-day terms.

The full list of medical suspensions included:

  • Michael Chiesa: suspended 180 days due to a possible left-shoulder injury, though a doctor can clear him early; regardless, 30 days with no contact for 21 days due to a scalp laceration
  • Tim Boetsch: suspended 180 days due to possible right-foot and shin injuries, though a doctor can clear him early
  • Johny Hendricks: suspended for 30 days with no contact for 21 days for precautionary reasons
  • Felice Herrig: suspended 180 days due to a possible left-wrist injury, though a doctor can clear her early; regardless, 30 days with no contact for 21 days for precautionary reasons
  • Justine Kish: suspended for 30 days with no contact for 21 days due to a left-eyebrow laceration
  • Joachim Christensen: suspended for 45 days with no contact for 30 days for precautionary reasons
  • B.J. Penn: suspended for 45 days with no contact for 30 days for precautionary reasons
  • Marvin Vettori: suspended for 30 days with no contact for 21 days for precautionary reasons
  • Vitor Miranda: suspended 180 days due to a possible right-ankle injury, though a doctor can clear him early; regardless, 30 days with no contact for 21 days due to left-ear and nasal lacerations
  • Devin Powell: suspended 180 days due to possible left-ankle injury, though a doctor can clear him early
  • Michel Quinones: suspended for 45 days with no contact for 30 days for precautionary reasons
  • Johnny Case: suspended 180 days due to a possible hand, foot/ankle and nose injuries, though a doctor can clear him early; regardless, 60 days with no contact for 45 days due to a left-orbital laceration
  • Tony Martin: suspended for 30 days with no contact for 21 days for precautionary reasons
  • Josh Stansbury: suspended for 45 days with no contact for 30 days for precautionary reasons

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Conor McGregor’s Coach Believes He Has Many Advantages Over Floyd Mayweather

With what seems to be impossible odds to overcome, John Kavanagh and his most famous student, Conor McGregor, find themselves in a position that they describe as familiar. In his recent column for Irish publication The42, Kavanagh recently wrote that he is convinced that McGregor will once again shock the world when he boxes Floyd Mayweather on Aug. 26 in Las Vegas.

Kavanagh believes his champion has enough advantages over Mayweather to overcome all odds and gain the victory.

“I believe we have a number of advantages going into this fight,” said Kavanagh. “Often, people who are experts in a certain field will tell you that it can actually be more awkward to deal with somebody who’s not from the same field. They’d rather deal with the top contender from their own discipline because he’ll move in a way that you assume he’ll move.”

That’s something that Kavanagh feels could be a significant advantage for McGregor.

“Mayweather has been in the boxing world for his entire career and everyone he’s faced has moved in a certain way that he’s pre-conditioned to handle. Now he’s going up against a guy who doesn’t follow any set patterns, who can deploy a variety of different styles of fighting and is not one bit intimidated. Conor is — as we all are here — 100-percent confident in victory. That kind of person is very difficult to deal with.” 

TRENDING > In Defense of Conor McGregor

Kavanagh remained coy on what specifics the SBG team from Ireland had planned.

“A lot of very experienced and respected boxers have been in touch to offer their help for this training camp, but we’re keeping our cards close to our chest for now at least. There will be sparring with guys we’re already familiar with, but we will also be bringing in some guys who I think people will be impressed with. But I’ll leave it to Conor to reveal that, should he choose to do so.”

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Source: MMA Weekly

With Aug. 19 event scrapped, Edmonton now hosts UFC 215 on Sept. 9

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The UFC is no longer hosting a pay-per-view event on Aug. 19.

Officials today announced plans for that show have been scrapped. As a result, a Sept. 9 event originally expected to be UFC 216 will now instead be UFC 215.

The show takes place at Rogers Place in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The main card airs on PPV, and FS1 and UFC Fight Pass are expected to carry the prelims.

It’s the UFC’s first event in Edmonton in company history. It’s also the second in Canada this year; UFC Fight Night 105 took place in Halifax on Feb. 19.

The Aug. 19 event was never formally announced but was expected to take place in Seattle, possibly with flyweight champion and Seattle-area resident Demetrious Johnson, who’s recently butted heads with UFC officials. However, those plans have been nixed, though an exact reason wasn’t given.

A headliner for the new UFC 215 event on Sept. 9 hasn’t been set, though a few other matchups have been revealed in recent weeks.

The latest UFC 215 lineup includes:

  • Henry Cejudo vs. Wilson Reis
  • Rick Glenn vs. Gavin Tucker
  • Ashlee Evans-Smith vs. Sarah Moras
  • Arjan Bhullar vs. Luis Henrique

For more on UFC 215, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Tim Boetsch on Johny Hendricks' 'unprofessional' weight miss: 'Maybe he was taking me lightly'

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OKLAHOMA CITY – For UFC middleweight Tim Boetsch, what many considered an upset win was a mere realization of the exact scenario that he had visualized.

Boetsch (21-11 MMA, 12-10 UFC) dispatched former 170-pound champion Johnny Hendricks (18-7 MMA, 13-7 UFC) in the second round of Sunday’s UFC Fight Night 112 co-headliner. While Boetsch’s hands sealed the deal, a massive head-kick spelled the beginning of the end.

Boetsch is excited to add a a former titleholder to his list of victims. But that’s not his main reason to celebrate Sunday’s triumph.

“To be honest, I’m more excited that I went in there and executed the game plan exactly how we had envisioned it,” Boetsch said after the FS1-televised event at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Okla. “And I actually thought that we’d get the opportunity to throw that head kick in Round 2. I didn’t know exactly when, but I saw the opportunity early. There it was.”

Boetsch said he saw basically what he was expecting from Hendricks: a fighter who’s “heavy on the lead leg” with, of course, some serious power in his left hand. The plan to counter that, Boetsch explained, was to chop the front leg and set up the fight-finishing kick with the teep to the body.

“It works perfectly against southpaws,” Boetsch said. “As you see, there’s the result: head-kick knockout.”

Of course, not everything went exactly as planned. What was supposed to be a 185-pound bout became a catchweight when Hendricks, who’d repeatedly failed to make the 170-pound limit of the division he once ruled, missed the middleweight limit as well.

Boetsch, who had performed at heavier divisions, had no major issue with accommodating Hendricks’ miss – and he got 20 percent of his purse in return. But the respect he holds for Hendricks’ ex-champ credentials doesn’t mean he gets a full pass for his “very unprofessional” move.

“We joked about that in camp; somebody said, ‘What are the chances of him missing weight at this one?’” Boetsch said. “I said, ‘I don’t really care if he does.’ I jokingly said that he might, and then Marcus (Davis) came to me the morning of the weigh-ins and said he was going to miss, and not even attempt it.

“We still had a couple of hours, or an hour and a half left at that point. So I’m like, ‘All right, I guess we’ll see how this goes.’ If he’s not willing to cut a couple extra pounds, (it) kind of speaks to his professionalism.”

Boetsch said that his camp had been following a bit of Hendricks’ camp online, and had found that the ex-champ was weighing in at 189 pounds after practice. Which makes him think about the reasons for the miss.

“I don’t see any reason why he didn’t make the weight, other than just he lack of discipline,” Boetsch said. “Maybe he was taking me lightly. I don’t know. But anybody who does that should probably rethink it.”

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Filed under: Featured Videos, News, UFC, Videos
Source: MMA Junkie

Cris Cyborg Pleads Not Guilty To Battery Charges

Cris “Cyborg” Justino entered a plea of not guilty to battery charges stemming from an altercation with Angela Magana during the UFC Athlete Retreat in May. According to TMZ, Cyborg plans to fight the misdemeanor charge.

The incident happened in Las Vegas on May 21 outside of the fighter hotel when Cyborg confronted Magana over the numerous social media jabs she’s taken at her. Magana has consistently posted sharp comments about Cyborg’s past anti-doping infractions, as well as taking personal shots at her over her looks.  Video of the incident later surfaced

TRENDING > Twitter Rips Referee Mario Yamasaki After UFC Oklahoma City Main Event Stoppage

Police were called to the scene of the altercation and Cyborg was cited but not arrested. She faces a penalty of up to six months in jail and/or a fine of up to $1,000 if found guilty. 

The Brazilian is due back in court in August.  Cyborg is expected to face Megan Anderson for he vacant women’s 145-pound at UFC 214 on July 29.

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Source: MMA Weekly

UFC Fight Night 112 post-event facts: Don't let controversy overshadow Kevin Lee's success

The UFC’s return to Oklahoma City, Okla., provided plenty of fight time, with eight of the 13 fights on Sunday’s UFC Fight Night 112 lineup at Chesapeake Energy Arena going to a decision.

Kevin Lee (16-2 MMA, 9-2 UFC) didn’t need the scorecards to win the lightweight main event against Michael Chiesa (14-3 MMA, 7-3 UFC), but he could have used better officiating; his first-round submission win was overshadowed by a premature stoppage from referee Mario Yamasaki.

Nevertheless, “The Motown Phenom” got another notable win, helping advance his status in the UFC lightweight division. For more on the numbers to come out of Sunday’s event, check out 50 post-event facts from UFC Fight Night 112.

* * * *

General

Clay Guida

The UFC-Reebok Athlete Outfitting payout for the event totaled $182,500.

Debuting fighters went 2-1 at the event.

Lee, Tim Boetsch, Dominick Reyes and Jeremy Kimball earned $50,000 UFC Fight Night 112 fight-night bonuses.

UFC Fight Night 112 drew an announced attendance of 7,605 for a live gate of $549,302.

Betting favorites went 9-4 on the card.

Total fight time for the 13-bout card was 2:21:37.

Main card

Michael Chiesa and Kevin Lee

Lee’s five-fight UFC winning streak in lightweight competition is tied with Al Iaquinta for the third longest active streak in the division behind Tony Ferguson (nine) and Khabib Nurmagomedov (seven).

Lee’s nine UFC victories since 2012 in lightweight competition are most in the division.

Lee has earned eight of his nine career stoppage victories by submission.

Lee’s three-fight submission streak in UFC competition is the longest among active fighters.

Michael Chiesa

Lee has earned his past four victories by stoppage.

Lee has completed at least one takedown against 10 of his 11 UFC opponents.

Lee’s 25 takedowns since 2014 in UFC lightweight competition are most in the division.

Chiesa has suffered all three of his career losses by stoppage.

Chiesa failed to complete a takedown for the first time in his career.

Tim Boetsch (21-11 MMA, 12-10 UFC) improved to 3-1 since he returned to the UFC middleweight division in July 2016.

Tim Boetsch

Boetsch has earned his past four UFC victories by stoppage.

Johny Hendricks (18-7 MMA, 13-7 UFC) fell to 1-1 since he moved up to the UFC middleweight division in February.

Hendricks fell to 1-4 in his past five fights.

Hendricks has suffered both of his career stoppage losses by knockout.

Felice Herrig

Felice Herrig’s (13-6 MMA, 4-1 UFC) four victories in UFC strawweight competition are tied for second most in divisional history behind champ Joanna Jedrzejczyk (eight).

Herrig’s three-fight UFC winning streak in strawweight competition is the second longest active streak in the division behind Jedrzejczyk (eight).

Herrig has earned eight of her 13 career victories by decision.

Justine Kish (6-1 MMA, 2-1 UFC) had her six-fight winning streak snapped for the first defeat of her career.

Dominick Reyes

Reyes (7-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC) has earned six of his seven career victories by first-round stoppage.

Reyes’ 29-second victory marked the second fastest stoppage by any debuting light heavyweight in UFC history behind Ryan Jimmo’s seven-second win at UFC 149.

Joachim Christensen (14-6 MMA, 1-3 UFC) suffered the first knockout loss of his career.

Tim Means (27-8-1 MMA, 9-5 UFC) improved to 7-3 (with one no-contest) since he returned to the UFC for a second stint in May 2014.

Dennis Siver

Dennis Siver (23-11 MMA, 12-8 UFC) returned to competition after a more than two-year layoff and earned his first victory since October 2014.

Siver improved to 4-3 (with one no-contest) since he dropped to the UFC featherweight division in April 2012.

Siver has earned his past six UFC victories by decision. He hasn’t earned a stoppage victory since November 2010.

B.J. Penn (16-12-2 MMA, 12-11-2 UFC) suffered his fifth consecutive loss to extend the longest skid of his career. He hasn’t earned a victory since November 2010.

B.J. Penn

Penn fell to 1-7-1 in his past nine UFC appearances dating back to April 2010.

Penn fell to 0-3 since he dropped to the UFC featherweight division in July 2014.

Penn has been outlanded 747 to 312 in significant strikes during his past nine UFC fights.

Penn has suffered eight of his 12 career losses by decision.

Preliminary card

Clay Guida

Clay Guida (33-17 MMA, 13-11 UFC) was successful in his return to the UFC lightweight division. He earned his first victory in the weight class since June 2011.

Guida’s 63 takedowns landed in UFC competition are fifth most in company history behind Georges St-Pierre (87), Gleison Tibau (84), Frankie Edgar (67) and Demetrious Johnson (65).

Guida has attempted 172 takedowns during his UFC career, third most in company history behind Demian Maia (189) and Edgar (189).

Erik Koch (14-5 MMA, 4-4 UFC) fell to 2-4 in his past six UFC appearances.

Koch fell to 2-2 since returning to the UFC lightweight division in February 2014.

Carla Esparza

Carla Esparza (12-4 MMA, 3-2 UFC) improved to 2-1 since losing the UFC strawweight title to Joanna Jedrzejczyk in March 2015.

Esparza has completed at least one takedown against all five of her UFC opponents.

Esparza has completed 16 takedowns in her three UFC victories.

Maryna Moroz (8-2 MMA, 3-2 UFC) has suffered both of her career losses by decision.

Devin Powell (8-3 MMA, 0-2 UFC) has suffered all three of his career losses by decision.

Michel Quinones (8-2 MMA, 0-1 UFC) had his five-fight winning streak snapped for his first defeat since November 2012.

Quinones suffered the first knockout loss of his career.

Johnny Case (22-5 MMA, 4-2 UFC) suffered consecutive losses for the first time in nearly 10 years.

Jeremy Kimball

Case suffered the first decision loss of his career.

Kimball (15-6 MMA, 1-1 UFC) has earned 12 of his 15 career victories by stoppage.

Josh Stansbury (8-4 MMA, 1-2 UFC) suffered the first knockout loss of his career.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

FightMetric research analyst and live statistics producer Michael Carroll contributed to this story. Follow him on Twitter @MJCflipdascript.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Bellator NYC post-event facts: Michael Chandler sets dubious title-fight record

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Filed under: Bellator, News

Chael Sonnen concluded his long journey back to the win column on Saturday when the three-time UFC title challenger was victorious against Wanderlei Silva in the Bellator NYC main event.

Sonnen (29-15-1 MMA, 1-1 BMMA) capped off the organization’s return to pay-per-view with a unanimous-decision win over Silva (35-13-1 MMA, 0-1 BMMA) at Madison Square Garden in New York, making for what was one of many notable results from the event.

Bellator NYC followed the Bellator 180 lineup, which aired on Spike (after early prelims on MMAjunkie). The nine televised fights provided much in the way in the post-fight fallout, and for more on the numbers, check out 35 post-event facts to come out of Bellator NYC and Bellator 180.

* * * *

General

Bellator at Madison Square Garden

Debuting fighters went 3-6 at Bellator NYC and Bellator 180.

Betting favorites went 5-3 on the card. There were no odds available for one fight.

Betting favorites improved to 8-3 in Bellator main events this year.

Total fight time for the nine-bout Bellator NYC and Bellator 180 lineup was 1:33:36.

* * * *

Bellator NYC

Chael Sonnen

Sonnen snapped his two-fight losing skid for his first victory since August 2013. He earned just his second victory in his past six fights.

Sonnen earned his first decision victory since Jan. 28, 2012 – a span of 1,974 days (more than four years) and six fights.

Silva was unsuccessful in his return to competition after a more than four-year layoff. He hasn’t earned a victory since March 2013.

Silva has alternated wins and losses over his past seven fights.

Matt Mitrione

Matt Mitrione’s (12-5 MMA, 3-0 BMMA) three-fight Bellator winning streak in heavyweight competition is the second longest active streak in the division behind Cheick Kongo (five).

Mitrione has earned 11 of his 12 career victories by stoppage.

Mitrione has earned all three of his Bellator victories by knockout.

Fedor Emelianenko (36-5 MMA, 0-1 BMMA) fell to 2-1 since he returned from retirement in December 2015.

Fedor Emelianenko

Emelianenko had his five-fight winning streak snapped for his first defeat since July 2011.

Emelianenko has suffered all five of his career losses by stoppage.

Emelianenko suffered his first knockout loss since July 30, 2011 – a span of 2,156 days (nearly six years) and six fights

Brent Primus’ (8-0 MMA, 6-0 BMMA) six-fight Bellator winning streak in lightweight competition is the longest active streak in the division.

Michael Chandler and Brent Primus

Primus has earned four of his six Bellator victories by stoppage.

Michael Chandler (16-4 MMA, 13-4 BMMA) lost the Bellator lightweight title for the second time.

Chandler fell to 5-4 in Bellator championship fights.

Chandler’s four Bellator title-fight losses are most in company history.

Zach Freeman (9-2 MMA, 1-0 BMMA) has earned six of his seven career stoppage victories by submission.

Zach Freeman

Aaron Pico (0-1 MMA, 0-1 BMMA) was unsuccessful in his pro debut.

Douglas Lima (29-6 MMA, 11-2 BMMA) earned his first successful Bellator welterweight title defense. He failed to defend in his previous reign.

Lima’s 10 victories in Bellator welterweight competition are tied with Andrey Koreshkov for most in divisional history.

Douglas Lima and Lorenz Larkin

Lorenz Larkin (18-6 MMA, 0-1 BMMA) fell to 4-2 since he dropped to the welterweight division in January.

Larkin fell to 5-4 in his past nine fights.

Larkin has suffered five of his six career losses by decision.

Bellator 180

Ryan Bader

Ryan Bader (23-5 MMA, 1-0 BMMA) improved to 8-1 in his past nine fights.

Bader improved to 2-0 in rematches.

Phil Davis (17-4 MMA, 4-1 BMMA) has suffered all four of his career losses by decision.

Neiman Gracie (6-0 MMA, 4-0 BMMA) has earned five of his six career victories by stoppage.

Dave Marfone (5-3 MMA, 0-1 BMMA) suffered the first submission loss of his career.

James Gallagher

James Gallagher (7-0 MMA, 4-0 BMMA) has earned six of his seven career victories by stoppage.

Chinzo Machida (5-3 MMA, 2-1 BMMA) had his four-fight winning streak snapped for his first defeat since December 2010.

Machida suffered his first submission loss since Apr. 29, 2006 – a span of 4,074 days (more than 11 years) and six fights.

Heather Hardy (1-0 MMA, 1-0 BMMA), a pro boxing champion, was successful in her MMA debut.

For complete coverage of “Bellator: NYC” and Bellator 180, check out the MMA Events section of the site.

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Filed under: Bellator, News
Source: MMA Junkie

Glory days are over for B.J. Penn and Fedor Emelianenko, so why won't anyone tell them?

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Filed under: Bellator, Featured, News, UFC

The circumstances alone tell you how far B.J. Penn has fallen. Sunday night, a relatively lackluster UFC Fight Night event on cable TV, and he’s there opening the main-card portion of the show against a journeyman fighter coming off a two-year layoff.

Even worse, he loses.

This is the reality now for Penn. The UFC keeps giving him more chances to turn things around, lowering the bar each time he fails to clear it, and Penn keeps finding new ways to trip over it. This one – a majority decision loss to Dennis Siver at UFC Fight Night 112 in Oklahoma City< Okla. – wasn’t even as bad as some of the others.

He didn’t get knocked out. He didn’t get embarrassed. In fact, he came closer to winning than he has in at least six years. A solid right hand put Siver (23-11 MMA, 12-8 UFC) down in the second round, and a few followup strikes from Penn (16-12-2 MMA, 12-11-2 UFC) threatened to finish him off.

But when Siver didn’t roll over and quit, Penn faced a real problem. Whatever he had, he’d just spent. Siver came out for the third round looking to do some work whereas Penn looked like he’d rather go home. Surviving seemed like enough for him then, and he barely accomplished that.

Put that in perspective, would you? The great B.J. Penn, a former two-division champ, one of the best lightweights in UFC history, and now he’s lucky to survive three rounds with an aging and rusty Dennis Siver. If he can’t do any better than that, why do it at all?

It’s a question you could just as easily put to Fedor Emelianenko, another ghost from MMA’s past who added to his list of losses this past weekend. Emelianenko (36-5 MMA, 0-1 BMMA)  got put to sleep by Matt Mitrione (12-5 MMA, 3-0 BMMA) at Bellator NYC on Saturday night, which was his reward for being the slower party in the immediate aftermath of a rare double knockdown.

While Penn’s latest loss added to the worst losing streak of his career, Emelianenko’s snapped an actual winning streak. You know, sort of. Fighting in a string of smaller promotions in recent years has given Emelianenko the advantage of the friendliest possible matchmaking, along with some friendly judging to serve as an extra safety net.

It wasn’t until he signed with Bellator that he was forced to fight a real heavyweight for the first time in several years, and it ended with him laid out on the mat a little over a minute into the fight. Like Penn, he now finds himself a long way from the glory days of 2009.

And those days, they aren’t coming back. Not for Emelianenko and not for Penn. They must know that on some level, but they keep at it because they can. They can still pocket a paycheck for it. There are enough people for whom their names still mean something.

They have not yet been forcibly ejected from the sport, which means that as long they’re willing to take the beatings, they still have a home here. The pain and the public embarrassment is the rent they pay. As long as they regard it as a fair exchange, and as long as no one close to them can convince them to stop making it, here we are.

This is nothing new in combat sports, but that doesn’t make it fun to sit through. The current climate rewards name brands and nostalgia over actual skill and talent, meaning it’s never been a better time to be a past-his-prime fighter willing to trade what’s left of his reputation and brain cells for a few more nights in the cage.

Of course, another way of looking at it is that it’s never been a worse time to be one of those fighters, since those late career letdowns don’t come for free. There’s a price to be paid, and it’s not just in cable bills and pay-per-view dollars.

Penn and Emelianenko both seem eager to keep paying it, even if they might not know for years what the final bill comes to. The rest of us, we seem strangely addicted to this specific brand of sadness. We want to see fighters we know, even when it’s painfully apparent that the name is all that’s left of the man. We get that jolt of recognition, followed by the depressing reminder of their ongoing and inevitable deterioration.

Eventually, maybe we’ll decide it’s not such a good trade. Then again, we keep waiting for guys like Penn and Emelianenko to decide the same thing. So far neither one of us is truly ready to quit.

For complete coverage of Bellator NYC and UFC Fight Night 112, check out the MMA Events section of the site.

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Filed under: Bellator, Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Michael Chiesa goes off on ref Mario Yamasaki, pleas for rematch after being 'robbed'

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Filed under: Featured, Featured Videos, News, UFC, Videos

OKLAHOMA CITY – Needless to say, Michael Chiesa is not a fan of Mario Yamasaki.

Chiesa (14-3 MMA, 7-3 UFC) saw the first headlining spot of his UFC career end on a controversial note on Sunday, when referee Yamasaki called a first-round stop to his UFC Fight Night 112 contest with Kevin Lee (16-2 MMA, 9-2 UFC). Chiesa was on the bad end of a seemingly tight rear-naked choke, but with just a few seconds left on the clock, he was still conscious when Yamasaki stepped in.

Chiesa was at least alert enough to immediately contest the ending of the FS1-televised event at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Okla. Between the stoppage and the official announcement of Lee’s win, Chiesa could be seen angrily pacing around the octagon and mouthing some of his thoughts on the ref (via Twitter):

Chiesa’s feelings on Yamasaki hadn’t changed when he talked to the media immediately after the event. The lightweight’s tirade might have lacked “fancy words,” but it certainly didn’t lack passion.

“This is the main event – that is JV bull(expletive),” Chiesa said. “That guy is too focused on being some kind of playboy in front of the cameras, making his little heart logos. Maybe he should go back and read the (expletive) rule book.

“I’m not trying to sound like a poor sport, but it’s really hard to be positive right now when I’ve been striving for this main-event spot. And I get it. And it feels like I just got (expletive) robbed. It’s hard not to feel that way.”

For Chiesa, the sting was made even worse by his history with stoppages. His last setback before Sunday’s, stemming from a “Fight of the Night” with Joe Lauzon in 2014, was the result of a doctor’s call due to a deep gash above Chiesa’s right eye. Between Lauzon and Lee, Chiesa put together a three-fight winning streak, with wins over Mitch Clarke, Jim Miller and Beneil Dariush.

To make his case as to why the stoppage was premature, the 155-pounder brought up the example of fellow UFC lightweight Al Iaquinta – who rode out a submission attempt by Lee before coming out victorious of their UFC 169 scrap – and broke down his decision-making process.

“I fought the best grapplers at lightweight,” Chiesa said. “The best. They all had my back in Round 1, and I got out every single time. I’ve studied my film on Kevin. It’s a palm-to-palm rear-naked choke. An arm-pump choke. I fight the hands when he’s going RNC, switch to palm-to-palm, shrink your shoulders in, flex your neck, get your elbows in.

“When he loosens up, you elbow down, turn in. I saw there was a short time on the clock. I went into what I know. And the next thing I know the fight is getting stopped.”

Chiesa has yet to look at the footage. But as someone who watches a lot of fights, he said Yamasaki’s call felt “like the worst stoppage ever.” The lightweight also questioned the very fact that “poor official” Yamasaki was even appointed to a headliner in the first place.

“Here’s what’s frustrating: You put a guy who’s just swirled in controversy in charge of a main event?” Chiesa said. “You realize that this defects ours lives. I’m not talking from a financial standpoint – I don’t care about the money. You’re talking – (if) I win this fight I go into the top five. I’m on the brink of a title shot.

“The opportunity got taken away from me. Now Kevin technically has got a win over me, swirled in controversy. That’s taken away from him. And then the fans. You think the fans want to watch a main event on a Sunday night end like this? No. It’s just pathetic. I really feel like this is a (expletive) dream. Between the Joe Lauzon fight and this, (I can’t believe it).”

Chiesa, however, doesn’t intend to leave it alone. On the official end of things, he plans to appeal the call with the local commission. But not overly confident that’s going to get him anywhere, he also wants a chance to make things right in the octagon.

“We’re going to seek due diligence,” Chiesa said. “This really is bull(expletive). Chances are it’s not going to get overturned, but I’m not going to go down without a fight. And best case scenario, I get a (expletive) rematch in Detroit. I’ll fight him in his backyard. I’ll fight him right now.”

While Lee reiterated his desire to meet Khabib Nurmagomedov next, Chiesa doesn’t see that happening. And while he maintains there is no personal beef with Lee, in spite of the heated press conference moment the two had shared weeks before, he is absolutely driven to get a do-over.

“If you think you really beat me, then beat me again,” Chiesa said. “Prove it. There’s no way you’re going to ride this win thinking you won. You did not beat me. You did not beat me. There’s no way. I’m fine. I heard he’s limping around on crutches. He’s supposed to be the striker. I landed one punch and put him on his ass. Let’s run it back.

“I want to prove that I was going to win that fight. I want to prove that I got robbed. And I want to prove Yamasaki that he’s so (expletive) wrong that he can’t even see straight.”

Between the controversy and their pre-fight shennanigans, Chiesa said that, promotion-wise, the matchup is a no-brainer. And he is so confident that he can beat Lee that he’ll not only give him a trilogy – he’ll let his new favorite ref join the cage with them.

“I’ll let Yamasaki actually be the ref both times,” Chiesa said. “And his poor officiating won’t be able to (expletive) do anything with the results, because I’ll make it very definitive.”

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Michael Chiesa: Mario Yamasaki Should Crawl in a Whole; He Should Never Officiate Again

(Video courtesy of UFC on Fox | Viewing may be limited by broadcast rights restrictions)

If only given the chance, Michael Chiesa insists that he would have gotten out of Kevin Lee’s fight-ending rear-naked choke at UFC Fight Night 112: Chiesa vs. Lee on Sunday in Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Chiesa was given the chance for a short time, but his chance ended abruptly when referee Mario Yamasaki stopped the fight even though Chiesa did not tap out to the choke. 

RELATED > Kevin Lee’s Controversial Submission Victory (Fight Highlights)

Yamasaki’s decision left Chiesa beside himself. He said on the post-fight show on FS1 that he and his team are going to try and appeal the outcome, but declared that Yamasaki should not ever be allowed to step in the cage to ref a fight again.

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Source: MMA Weekly

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