Category Archives: UFC Fight Night 111

Pic: UFC-Singapore's Frank Camacho shows everyone the damage from Li Jingliang's leg kicks

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If you ever somehow find yourself in a cage with Li Jingliang, protect your legs.

That’s the main takeaway from Frank Camacho.

Two days after Camacho (20-5 MMA, 0-1 UFC), a UFC newcomer and late replacement, came up short in a UFC Fight Night 111 both with Jingliang (13-4 MMA, 5-2 UFC), the welterweight posted a pic of his badly bruised leg. It showed the aftermath of Jingliang’s steady stream of low kicks during Saturday’s UFC Fight Pass-streamed bout at Singapore Indoor Stadium in Singapore.

As he wrote, “Those leg kicks were real hahah” (via Twitter):

Things started off well enough for Camacho, who ultimately suffered a unanimous-decision loss via 29-27, 28-27 and 29-27 scores. However, it was a come-from-behind win for Jingliang, who was tagged solidly with the first punch of the fight (via Twitter):

Camacho, a replacement for injured Jonathan Meunier, is a Guam-born fighter who was raised in Saipan. He was on a 5-1 run heading into his UFC debut. A veteran of the Guam-based Pacific Xtreme Combat promotion, the 28-year-old has 18 stoppages (including 15 knockouts) in 20 career wins. However, he struggled in the second and third rounds against Jingliang, who did clear damage with the low kicks late in the fight.

For complete coverage UFC Fight Night 111, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 111 reactions: Winning and losing fighters on social media

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Since the early days when the sport was anything but a mainstream endeavor, the MMA industry has thrived and survived through various websites, forums and, perhaps most importantly, social-media platforms.

Fighters interact with fans, each other and many more through the likes of Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, which helps outsiders get a deeper look into the minds of the athletes.

Following Saturday’s UFC Fight Night 111 event in Singapore, several of the winning and losing fighters, along with their coaches, training partners or family members, took to social media to react to the event or share a message with supporters.

Check out some of those reactions.

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The defeated

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The victorious

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For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 111, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

After controversial debut loss, Lucie Pudilova happy with recovery display at UFC Fight Night 111

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SINGAPORE – After a controversial loss in her UFC debut, Lucie Pudilova finally got a taste of octagon victory this Saturday.

Pudilova was UFC Fight Night 111’s first victor, narrowly beating Ji Yeon Kim to earn an unanimous nod on the judges’ scorecards. The win meant recovery from a UFC Fight Night 107 setback to Lina Lansberg – which, despite the across-the-board 29-28 scorecards, had a bloodied-up Lansberg  declaring Pudilova the winner.

While her submission attacks weren’t able to seal the deal against Kim, the bantamweight was “really very happy” with a display that intended to showcase a specific part of her arsenal.

“It’s great to be here and to win,” Pudilova said through a translator after the preliminary card fight, which streamed on UFC Fight Pass. “I wanted to show all visitors, all fans, that I could fight not only in striking. I wanted to show that I could beat her on the ground.

“I fully changed my strategy (from the Lansberg fight) because I knew she prepared mostly for a striking fight. I wanted to finish it on the ground.”

The 23-year-old Czech fighter had shown she is no dummy on the ground before, having won her two fights prior to the UFC call via submission. Before the UFC Fight Night 107 setback, she’d only had one professional defeat – against Lansberg herself, back in 2015.

Now, off to a 1-1 octagon start, Pudilova plans only on “training hard” and staying ready for her next call, whomever that may be against. But first, she’d like to thank her trainers, supporters and even the locals who may not have been entirely pleased with the win.

“I would like to thank people from Singapore,” Pudilova said. “Because even if they weren’t so happy with how the fight ended, they were nice.”

For more from Pudilova, check out the video above.

And for complete coverage UFC Fight Night 111, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

After finishing 'tougher than expected' Justin Scoggins, Ulka Sasaki wants Ray Borg next

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SINGAPORE – In the UFC’s game of inches, a winning strategy can start taking effect even before the fighters step onto the octagon.

For flyweight Ulka Sasaki (20-4-2 MMA, 3-3 UFC), who finished Justin Scoggins (11-4 MMA, 4-4 UFC) in the second round of their UFC Fight Night 111 encounter on Saturday, it started at their heated face-off the day before.

“Because I was very aggressive at the weigh-ins, that’s why I think I made Justin very aggressive at the beginning of the fight,” Sasaki said through a translator after their preliminary card affair at Singapore Indoor Stadium in Singapore. “So everything worked out for me.”

Happy ending aside, it wasn’t smooth sailing for the Japanese fighter, who had to navigate some solid offense by Scoggins’ before the American’s own risk-taking style backfired. Eventually, though, Sasaki was able to sink in the same rear-naked choke that had brought all of his previous UFC wins.

While Sasaki was able to weather the storm, and walked away with a $50,000 “Performance of the Night” bonus in the process, he admits to having been surprised by what his opponent brought to the table.

“First of all, he was much tougher than I expected,” Sasaki said. “Stronger than I expected. He had a much (bigger) variety of striking technique than I expected. So he was a very, very tough fighter.

“First, when I grappled with him, I felt like I could control him well. But he was much tougher. He had a better wrestling power. So I decided to not put my full body power into it. I was just looking for opportunity for my chance.”

The win evened out Sasaki’s six-fight octagon record and put him back on a victorious track after an unanimous decision loss to onetime title challenger Wilson Reis at UFC 208 in February.

As for what’s next, Sasaki didn’t hesitate to put in his request for a spot at a UFC Fight Night event expected to take place at Saitama Super Arena, near Tokyo, on Sept. 23. And he has a target in mind, too.

“(Scoggins) has defeated Ray Borg,” Sasaki said. “So I would like to fight Ray Borg.”

To hear more from Sasaki, check out the video above.

And for complete coverage UFC Fight Night 111, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 111 winner Alex Caceres drops some wisdom, talks 'disheartening' end to scrap

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SINGAPORE – Alex Caceres isn’t entirely satisfied with the circumstances of his UFC Fight Night 111 fight but, hey, he’ll take it.

Caceres (13-10 MMA, 8-8 UFC) was originally set to face UFC newcomer Wang Guan on Saturday, but ended up welcoming Filipino fighter Rolando Dy (8-5-1 MMA, 0-1 UFC) to the octagon instead. It took a doctor declaring Dy unfit to continue for the scrap to be stopped before the start of the third round, but Caceres had asserted plenty of dominance by then.

The opponent switch may have ended up in Caceres’ favor, but the featherweight saw it two ways.

“I was disappointed that they switched out my original opponent,” Caceres told reporters after the preliminary card bout at Singapore Indoor Stadium in Singapore, which streamed on UFC Fight Pass. “I feel like he might have been more prepared. But I also kind of let this quick switch fuel the fire. I know that he thought he could beat me on two weeks’ notice.

“But literally, when I was in there, every time I hit him, I was telling myself he doesn’t belong here with me. I’ve been here too damn long, I’ve been training too damn hard, and I’m too damn fast, too damn fine. He can’t touch me.”

While Caceres’ habitually creative striking looked crisp as ever, he also brought some danger on the ground on Saturday. Dy, however, was able to escape a rear-naked choke attempt and get the fight back on the feet – where “Bruce Leeroy” continued his onslaught.

With the TKO, Caceres got his first finish since 2014. But, as good as the win feels, he would have liked to prove another point.

“I did want to showcase some of my grappling, because I’ve been working on it a lot,” Caceres said. “I felt like that was one of my biggest holes in my game. So I’ve been filling in that hole with a shovel every single day at practice. I’ve been working on it, man, and I really wanted to show a little bit more of that. I was looking for that submission. I really wanted it. But hey – you’ve got to win with what you can.”

In hindsight, Caceres believes a finish was well on its way regardless of the doctor’s intervention. But he understands why his opponent was so visibly frustrated with how the bout came to a halt.

“I could see in the second round, before coming out, I didn’t think he wanted to be in there anymore, to be honest with you,” Caceres said. “I hit him pretty hard with that left hand and it closed his eye pretty well. I know he couldn’t see the kicks coming or the punches coming.

“I can expect it’s pretty disheartening for him. I know that he wanted to keep fighting. He showed it, too. I was disheartened as well – I wanted to keep going.”

Now recovered from back-to-back losses to Yair Rodriguez and Jason Knight, Caceres says he is injury-free, open to facing anyone and ready to get back to training as soon as he gets home.

And, whatever his octagon future holds, Caceres will bring some newly acquired wisdom to help brave it. After an exciting, but inconsistent UFC run that certainly carried a lot of criticism along the way, the featherweight says he’s done trying to conform to expectations other than his own.

“It really took a big load off my shoulders to not live for anybody else’s expectations or anybody else’s image of perfection – to be myself,” Caceres said. “They say that to be impeccable is to be without sin. And they say sin is to be untrue to yourself. So I stayed true to myself. I believed in myself. I didn’t let anybody tell me that I wasn’t powerful enough to hit nobody hard or I wasn’t quick enough.

“I dispelled those words away from my mentality and my spirituality. And I told myself every single day that I do have the power, I do have the speed. I am good enough. It’s something that’s very hard. It’s something we lose as we grow up from being a child. We become domesticated. And I guess that’s the thing. I’m un-domesticating myself from society’s views of perfection.

“For I am my own person, and I can be perfect in my own way. And all I have to do is give it my best every single day. Even though my best might not be the best all the time, but as long as I put forth the effort, and the intention, and try, and struggle very hard for what I believe in, I know I’ll do well and I’ll always come out on top.”

To hear more from Caceres, including the pep-talk he gave Dy after their bout was stopped, check out the video above.

And for complete coverage UFC Fight Night 111, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 111's Jon Tuck isn't ready to say Takanori Gomi should retire

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SINGAPORE – UFC lightweight Jon Tuck just handed former PRIDE champ Takanori Gomi his fourth straight octagon loss.

At 38, Gomi is running out of chances to right his storied career. But Tuck doesn’t think the legend should be pressured into retiring.

“I wouldn’t say he should hang up his gloves, because I know what kind of fighter I am, without sounding like I’m cocky,” said Tuck (10-4 MMA, 4-4 UFC), who submitted Gomi (35-13 MMA, 4-8 UFC) in the first round of their UFC Fight Pass-streamed bout at UFC Fight Night 111. “I know that I belong in the top – it’s just me being able to prove it in the octagon. He’s got a wealth of experience.”

UFC Fight Night 111 took place Saturday at Singapore Indoor Stadium in Singapore.

Tuck has eight octagon appearances in total, but he looked like a veteran slicing through Gomi with kicks and punches before cinching the fight-ending submission.

Still, the 32-year-old from Guam said Gomi still has a lot to offer in the cage and should be in control of his career. He even entertained the idea of the Japanese vet making a comeback.

“Like Michael Bisping, Michael just got a championship after how many years of trying,” Tuck said. “Demian Maia, look how great he is. Because I beat Takanori, it doesn’t mean he should hang up his gloves. But if he does hang up his gloves, I’m honored that he was able to step inside the octagon and share it with me.

“I still think he’s got a lot in him – it just depends on how (far) he wants to take it.”

One thing is for sure: Tuck is going places after stopping Gomi and snapping a two-fight win streak. Check out the video above for more from the fighter.

And for complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 111, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 111's Walt Harris would call someone out – if he could remember anybody

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SINGAPORE – It’s tough to transition from fighting in the cage to being your own agent, especially if you haven’t planned out your next step in advance.

Just ask UFC heavyweight Walt Harris (9-5 MMA, 2-4 UFC), who was so pleased with his quick pound-out of Cyril Asker (8-2 MMA, 1-1 UFC) at UFC Fight Night 111, his name went blank on potential future opponents.

“I’m down to fight anybody,” he told MMAjunkie backstage at Singapore Indoor Stadium, which hosted the UFC Fight Pass-streamed event. “I’m not going to call any names right now, because I honestly can’t remember anybody offhand.

“But anybody, man. I pride myself on being a company man. Whenever they call, I’m coming. I’m going to heal up and come back and I’m going to be 110 percent ready.”

Harris successfully battled demons that led to a 1-3 streak inside the octagon, and has since racked up two straight wins. That’s a good start in the heavyweight division, which is always in need of fresh contenders.

“I think you just saw a small glimpse of it tonight,” he said. “I think I’ve got a lot more tools in the shed that haven’t been unveiled yet.”

At 34, Harris needs to get cracking soon if he wants to get into title contention before age becomes a factor. But thankfully, he can do that in the big-man division.

Now, he just needs to bring along a list of names for his post-fight speech.

Check out the video above for more from Harris.

And for complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 111, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

With the right encouragement, Holly Holm found the KO artist within. Will it last this time?

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It was shaping up to be one of those main events where five rounds sounds more like a threat than a promise.

A lot of movement and meaningful stares. Some vicious pummeling of the empty air between Holly Holm and Bethe Correia. A warning from referee Marc Goddard, who told the women as politely as he could that the crowd hadn’t assembled in Singapore Indoor Stadium to watch them strategize just out of one another’s reach.

Correia (10-3-1 MMA, 4-3-1 UFC) must have been getting restless too. Early in the third round, she flashed Holm (11-3 MMA, 4-3 UFC) the international hand gesture for “Bring it.” A few seconds later Holm brought it directly upside her head.

A shin to the face sat Correia down. She raised a hand as if to say, “Could you give me a second here?” Holm replied with a left hand that ended the discussion. Just like that, the overnight journey of UFC Fight Night 111 was at an end.

What a relief this victory must have been for Holm. Remember when she was the second coming? Remember when she meme-ified Ronda Rousey and had the world by the throat? That ended up being a shockingly short-lived triumph.

First Miesha Tate took her UFC women’s bantamweight title with a fifth-round burglary. Then she dropped a pair of decisions in fights she seemed entirely capable of winning. The end result was this, a UFC Fight Pass main event on the other side of the world against an opponent known for having more aggression than skill.

This was exactly the kind of fight Holm was supposed to win, which made it the kind she had to win. Holm’s status as the very first Rousey-killer could maybe survive a couple close decision losses. But she couldn’t not beat Correia. Not if she wanted to stay even semi-relevant.

So now the dreaded three-fight losing skid is over, presenting Holm with some interesting options. The good news is she’s one of the few women under contract to the UFC who has actually fought at 145 pounds, even if it was just once and even if she lost. Still, she has a name and a history and a division that can’t seem to even keep its own champion interested in hanging around could sure use someone like her.

Then again, there are still options for her at bantamweight. The book on Holm says that she’s a skilled striker and an extremely dangerous one when she has an opponent willing to be the one who moves forward. The current champ, Amanda Nunes, is just that type of fighter. It’s not at all unreasonable to think that the women’s 135-pound wheel of fortune might spin back her way some time soon.

But let’s not act like one win, even if it’s one for the highlight reel, removes all doubt about Holm. Even in victory she showed the same reluctance at range that’s plagued her in previous fights. She has a unique gift for giving away rounds to lesser talents, which doesn’t pair well with her personal moratorium on charisma.

There’s so much to like about Holm as a fighter. You just wish it would show up every time she does.

In Singapore, at least, it did. For the fans who cared enough to pair the UFC with their morning coffee, it was a memorable ending to what had been a sleepy slog of a fight right up until then. That’s a start, at least. It’s a win. When you haven’t had one of those since 2015, you’ll probably take it any way you can get it.

For complete coverage UFC Fight Night 111, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 111's Holly Holm knew crowd would boo her game plan, but didn't care

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SINGAPORE – Former UFC women’s bantamweight champion Holly Holm had waited nearly two years to get her hand raised.

If she had to wait for the right moment to strike against Bethe Correia (10-3-1 MMA, 4-3-1 UFC), so be it, she said after returning to peak form with a head-kick knockout in the headliner of UFC Fight Night 111.

“The game plan was not to rush anything,” Holm (11-3 MMA, 4-3 UFC) told MMAjunkie after her UFC Fight Pass-streamed win Saturday at Singapore Indoor Stadium in Singapore. “We knew the crowd might boo; it’s the type of game plan the crowd might boo.”

Indeed, the audience signaled its displeasure fairly early in the fight when it became clear both fighters were approaching the main event with more caution than usual. Even referee Marc Goddard intervened to jolt the action, warning the pair for timidity.

But to Holm, the need to put on a show was outweighed by the one to be patient and seize the right opportunity, not just the first one that arrived.

“As soon as I heard it, I just thought, ‘You know what, I’m the one in here fighting. I’m going to stick to the game plan, and I’m going to pick the right shot,’” she said.

As it turned out, that came early in the third round when Correia got impatient and started taunting Holm, looking to engage in a brawl. It was a moment for which Holm had prepared, and soon after, she launched the fight-ending kick, which set up her first win since a shocking knockout of Ronda Rousey in November 2015.

Asked whether Correia’s taunting prompted her to seek revenge, Holm said she was unfazed. Yet she still relished the idea of landing that signature move that stung Rousey.

“If I was training to fight me, I’d be like, ‘OK, she has a left kick. Let’s watch out for it,’” Holm said. “It’s one of those things, just that competitive side of me that thinks, ‘You know it’s coming, but I still want to hit you with it.’

“The taunting doesn’t do anything to me. That’s never affected me in any fight I’ve ever had. My whole plan was to stick to my game plan.”

Now, Holm gets to drive a different narrative than the one that followed her into the fight. Before she smacked Correia upside the head, she’d lost three straight fights, losing the women’s bantamweight title and a chance to capture the inaugural women’s featherweight belt in her previous outing. Moving back into the win column means she gets a break from doubts about her viability, and it validates the approach she took to prepare for the fight.

“I really wanted to enjoy this camp, this fight week, and I wanted to remind myself over and over that I do this because I love it,” she said. “A lot of people keep asking me, ‘What are you going to do now? You’re on a three-fight losing streak – what are you going to do now?’ It doesn’t really matter what everybody thinks I’m going to do. I started fighting because I love it and I’m passionate about it, and that was the reminder here. I’m going to be me. I’m the one who’s getting in there and fighting, anyway.”

The crowd might not have liked every moment of her effort, but things turned out just fine. As for what comes next, she isn’t too worried about it.

“As far as what’s next for me, I see a beer and some french fries, and a beautiful view over Singapore at the hotel,” Holm said.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 111, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 111's Rafael dos Anjos wants welterweight belt, but vows to go step-by-step

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SINGAPORE – Former UFC lightweight champion Rafael dos Anjos isn’t rushing his push for a title in the welterweight division. But after beating ranked opposition, he’s ready to move up the ladder.

“I want to fight again before the end of this year,” dos Anjos (26-9 MMA, 15-7 UFC) said after outpointing Tarec Saffiedine (16-7 MMA, 2-4 UFC) on the UFC Fight Pass-streamed main card of UFC Fight Night 111, which took place at Singapore Indoor Stadium in Singapore. “There’s many guys. We have (Donald) Cerrone and Robbie Lawler. Tyron Woodley is fighting Demian Maia for the title. I don’t have anyone in mind, but I want to fight higher-ranked guys, and somebody who leads me to take a step up in the division. I don’t want to go backward.”

Dos Anjos did that after the loss of the lightweight belt in 2016 and a subsequent loss to contender Tony Ferguson in an effort to get back into the title race at 155 pounds. Health concerns over excessive weight-cutting prompted the Brazilian ex-champ to move up to the welterweight division, where he still needs to shed pounds, albeit many fewer.

“It wasn’t even close to what it was to make 155,” dos Anjos said. “I can’t say it was easy, but compared to 155, it was easy. I was 180 (pounds) today. But (I was) feeling strong and feeling fast, and that’s what I’m looking for. My health comes first.”

Adjusting to the bulk of a veteran welterweight proved easy for dos Anjos, who put the tough-to-ground Saffiedine on the mat and dominated in positional battles. The final scores were 30-27 twice and 29-28 for the former champ, who snapped a two-fight skid.

“I’ve reached the top, and right now at welterweight, I feel like I have to make some adjustments,” dos Anjos said. “I will make those technically and be a better fighter at 170.

“He was taller, but I didn’t feel he was that strong. I’ve fought at lightweight with guys that were stronger than Tarec. I think I won most of the exchanges. I want to go back home, watch the fight, and always improve.”

Dos Anjos shied away, as usual, from making any bold proclamations about his conquest at 170 pounds. Instead, he said he’ll walk that road step by step, hopefully ending in a chance to win another UFC title.

“I don’t think I’m at the top of my game in this division, but I’m coming,” he said.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 111, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie