Thanks to Mayweather vs. McGregor, Nevada sports books won a record amount in August

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Dann StuppWe knew Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor was going to do big business, and Nevada sports books were among the beneficiaries.

This past month, Mayweather (50-0 boxing) picked up a 10th-round TKO win over McGregor (21-3 MMA, 9-1 UFC, 0-1 boxing), the reigning UFC lightweight champion, in a pay-per-view boxing blockbuster in Las Vegas.

Betting on the fight was immense; MMAjunkie devoted an entire three-part series to it. At the sports books, McGregor, who had never boxed professionally, was only a small underdog – smaller than many of the established pro boxers that Mayweather faced during his accomplished career.

Still, despite odds for McGregor opening at +1100 (11-1) and being bet all the way down to +375 (3.75-1) at one point, Mayweather ultimately cruised in the later rounds and forced a TKO stoppage to pick up career win No. 50.

Had McGregor pulled off the upset, the sports books could’ve taken a bath. However, as ESPN.com‘s David Purdum reported, Nevada books set an August record by winning $33.9 million. According to the report, $65 million was wagered on Mayweather-McGregor, and the books took a whopping profit of approximately $15 million from that fight alone.

Some other interesting tidbits from the ESPN.com report:

  • Vegas books smashed the previous August record ($14.2 million). Of the $33.9 million won this August, the most came from Mayweather vs. McGregor ($15 million). The books also won $8.6 million on baseball and $6.6 million on football.
  • Mayweather’s 2015 bout with Manny Pacquiao previously held the record ($50 million) for the most heavily bet boxing bout.
  • Four $1 million bets were placed on May-Mac (three more than were placed on the Super Bowl LI game between the Patriots and Falcons) at Vegas books. All were placed on Mayweather.

Offshore and U.K. books also won heavily thanks to Mayweather-McGregor, which saw “The Notorious” picked by more bettors – but Mayweather tabbed by the bigger bettors.

For more on “The Money Fight: Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor,” check out the MMA Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Floyd Mayweather got some Conor McGregor artwork, and fans weren't impressed

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Dann StuppPerhaps Conor McGregor wasn’t his most dangerous boxing opponent, but Floyd Mayweather knows he was one of his most lucrative – and he’s honored “The Notorious.”

This past month, Mayweather (50-0 boxing) picked up a 10th-round TKO win over McGregor (21-3 MMA, 9-1 UFC, 0-1 boxing) in a pay-per-view boxing blockbuster in Las Vegas.

Both fighters likely received nine-figure paydays for the crossover spectacle, and it gave Mayweather that long-awaited 50-0 career mark. And despite a recent humblebrag about the win, Mayweather seems to have a soft spot for his recent foe.

Today, he shared some new artwork in his Beverly Hills home that honors “The Money Fight” between the two (via Twitter):

Despite Mayweather’s intentions, some “Money” fans were less than impressed (via Twitter):

For more on “The Money Fight: Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor,” check out the MMA Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Floyd Mayweather says he didn't knock out Conor McGregor to protect him from brain damage

Conor McGregor was taking a beating and basically on his way to being dropped – if not knocked out cold – by Floyd Mayweather last month. If not for referee Robert Byrd stepping in to save McGregor early in the 10th round, chances are the UFC lightweight champion was going to hit the canvas.

Mayweather (50-0 boxing) is happy it didn’t come to that and explained why he didn’t inflict more damage on McGregor (21-3 MMA, 9-1 UFC, 0-1 boxing) in a recent episode of the “Hollywood Unblocked” podcast.

“He has a career. You know, he still has a career. He’s still young,” Mayweather said. … (It could’ve been) very damaging. We have to think about these fighters. Even, like, my uncle Roger. Right now, I just got a call just before I came here. He keeps walking off, wandering off. No one can find him. He ends up in a hospital. So, brain damage – it happens. It happens.”

That’s either intriguing, thoughtful insight into the mindset of a prize fighter while he batters his opponent, or it’s just a humblebrag. Why could it be the latter?

Because moments later, as the host mentioned he was surprised McGregor “did better than what I thought he was going to do,” Mayweather interrupted to respond – and also confirm that he barely trained for the fight.

“OK, hold on. It’s a catch 22,” Mayweather said. “If I blew him out in the first round, they would have something to say. If we let the fight go on a little longer than expect, they’re going to have something to say. So it’s like, damned if I do, damned if I don’t. If I let it go the distance, they’re going to say something.

“Once again, we’re praising him. We’re not praising me. We’re praising him. Because I’m 40 years old, retired for two years. He’s 28, he’s active. I’m inactive. He’s taller, he’s bigger. Hey may not be stronger. He has a longer reach. He’s taller. He’s bigger. He’s younger. Youth is on his side. I’m just saying, everything on paper links on him. For me to come and be off, and really only train totally, probably three weeks .. and (I was) out every night partying.”

See what I mean? Whatever the case, the fight played out pretty much as expected, and everyone should be pleased with the outcome.

For more on “The Money Fight: Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor,” check out the MMA Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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A breakdown of Mayweather vs. McGregor ticket sales revenue

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The hottest ticket for “The Money Fight” was priced at $5,000.

That’s according to a breakdown of tickets sold for Floyd Mayweather’s 10th-round TKO win over UFC lightweight champion Conor McGregor, which revealed the third most expensive ticket was the best seller with 67 percent (3,183 of 4,737) of seats purchased.

Despite that rich price tag, those $5,000 seats, located at the top of the lower level seats at Las Vegas’ T-Mobile Arena, were deeply discounted close to fight night, sinking to $1,500 on the secondary market, according to ESPN.

Initially priced from $500 to $10,000, cheaper tickets were quickly snatched up and inflated on ticket websites like StubHub, though prices slowly decreased in the two months leading up to Mayweather (50-0 boxing) vs. McGregor (21-3 MMA, 9-1 UFC, 0-1 boxing) on Aug. 26. By fight week, the price was around $1,300.

The breakdown was released Monday to MMAjunkie by the Nevada State Athletic Commission, which regulated the spectacle boxing match.

The boxing event was well short of the $72.2 million live gate record set by Mayweather’s “Fight of the Century” against Manny Pacquiao in 2015. Yet it still generated a massive box office payout, with $55,414,865.79 in revenue on 13,231 tickets for an average of $4,188.26 per ticket.

The event’s pay-per-view buy rate, on the other hand, is “trending” to break the all-time record of 4.6 million set by Mayweather vs. Pacquiao.

Here’s the breakdown of ticket sales:

  • $10,000: 2,942 available
    2,254 sold
    29 complimentary
  • $7,500: 1,814 available
    1,145 sold
    18 complimentary
  • $5,000: 4,737 available
    3,183 sold
    22 complimentary
  • $3,500: 3,233 available
    1,601 sold
    68 complimentary
  • $2,500: 2,735 available
    2,716 sold
    0 complimentary
  • $1,500: 1,809 available
    1,781 sold
    0 complimentary
  • $500: 428 available
    414 sold
    0 complimentary

Total tickets sold and complimentary: 13,231

Total live gate: $55,414,865.79

Interestingly, the UFC is not listed as a promoter on the live gate sheet despite last-minute approval as a co-promoter alongside Mayweather Promotions and Showtime. A NSAC spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to a request for clarification.

For more on “The Money Fight: Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor,” check out the MMA Events section of the site.

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Did Floyd Mayweather barely even train for Conor McGregor fight?

Remember how there was a conspicuous lack of training footage being put out by Floyd Mayweather during the build-up to his boxing match with Conor McGregor? Perhaps that’s because practically none existed.

In the roughly 10 weeks from the time “The Money Fight” was announced until Mayweather’s 10th-round TKO win on Aug. 26, Mayweather shared just one clip of himself hitting the bag on Instagram. And not a single moment of training footage was revealed during “All Access” on Showtime or the “Embedded” series produced by the UFC.

Instead, what we mostly saw was Mayweather doing fight promotion and enjoying leisure activities with friends and family. Mayweather’s explanation during fight week was that he simply wanted to show a different side of himself, but maybe that wasn’t entirely true.

According to Floyd Mayweather Sr., his son “did not train for that fight.”

Via PhillyVoice.com:

“Floyd would have stopped (McGregor) a lot earlier if he worked even a little bit,” Mayweather Sr. said. “Floyd did not train for that fight. He literally whupped that boy, that’s what he did. Just imagine if my son would have prepared and would have trained the way he (normally) would for a fight. He would have stopped (McGregor) even sooner.

“What the world saw was only about 50 percent of what my son is capable of doing. Yes, you can say it: It was like he literally came off the street to beat that man. That’s how good my son is. That’s basically it. I used to run with my son, but we haven’t ran together in a long time. As far as I’m concerned, he didn’t run for this fight. Floyd didn’t put all of what Floyd could do in the McGregor fight.

“If the real Floyd Mayweather Jr. would have showed up for the McGregor fight, McGregor wouldn’t have gotten out of the second round.”

A member of Mayweather’s camp echoed Mayweather Sr.’s sentiments.

“Floyd hit the speed bag or did a light run, but he spent more time promoting the fight and at his businesses than preparing for McGreogr,” he said. “There’s no way around it; Floyd is a genetic freak. He’s been fighting so long that things just come naturally to him. All this social media stuff about McGregor going 10 rounds with the best in the world is (expletive). It’s actually the other way around: A 50-percent version of Floyd Mayweather came off the street and pounded one of the world’s best MMA fighters and hardly trained to do it. It says how much better Floyd is than McGregor.

Did Mayweather literally “not train for that fight” as his father stated? No, I don’t believe that.

But considering this was a case of one of boxing’s all-time greats welcoming an MMA fighter making his professional boxing debut, it’s easy to believe Mayweather took McGregor lightly. In fact, Mayweather basically proved it beforehand as we saw him eating Burger King close to the fight and indulging in his strip club in the middle of the night just days before, which he said he did every night of fight week.

Combine those actions with the words now coming from his camp, and you have to wonder if Mayweather ever viewed McGregor as a real threat.

In other words, easy money.

For more on “The Money Fight: Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor,” check out the MMA Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor breaks U.K. pay-per-view buys record with over 1 million

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Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor garnered over 1 million pay-per-view buys in the United Kingdom, Sky Sports confirmed to BoxingNewsOnline.net today.

The significance?

The over-1-million mark breaks the previous U.K. record set by the heavyweight showdown between Anthony Joshua and Wladimir Klitschko in April of this year. It also blows away the number for the 2015 fight between Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao, which hauled in 700,000 buys.

A final number for the U.S. has yet to be revealed.

Though the $55.4 million live gate for “The Money Fight” between Mayweather and McGregor fell well short of the $72.2 million record set by Mayweather-Pacquiao, things continue to trend in the right direction on the pay-per-view side of things.

Showtime executive Stephen Espinoza told MMAjunkie last week Mayweather-McGregor was “trending” to break the 4.6 million record held by Mayweather-Pacquiao. This came just days after UFC President Dana White might have made a bold claim of an astounding 6.5 million buys.

Mayweather (50-0 boxing) defeated McGregor (21-3 MMA, 9-1 UFC, 0-1 boxing) by 10th-round TKO on Aug, 26 at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.

For more on “The Money Fight: Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor,” check out the MMA Events section of the site.

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This PRIDE-tastic edit of Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor will give you nostalgia chills

It was only a matter of time until some intrepid video editor gave us the version of the Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor finish that we didn’t know we needed. That, of course, would be the version that brings together the pageantry of PRIDE Fighting Championships with the circus fight of the century, resulting in an ending that just feels right.

It should come as no surprise that Twitter’s @Grabaka_Hitman was the one to give us this PRIDE-tastic edit. In addition to seemingly watching every professional fight that happens anywhere in the world, he’s also known for spreading video and GIFs of the notable moments far and wide across social media.

What’s great about this clip is how real it feels. From the excitable Japanese announcers who need no interpreter to make their enthusiasm understood, to the iconic and immediate post-fight finish music, you come away with the sense that, yes, Mayweather-McGregor was a fight that really should have taken place in Japan’s PRIDE organization.

And just think how much Mayweather would have enjoyed marching around with that oversized check after his TKO victory while the sky rained confetti.

At some point, surely the day will come when longtime MMA fans no longer have this almost Pavlovian response to hearing that music at the end of a fight. But, speaking only for myself here, clearly today is not that day.

For complete coverage of “The Money Fight,” check out the MMA Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor official live gate totals $55 million, good for second-best of all time

It turns out the live gate for Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor was not the all-time record most figured it would be, but the numbers are still pretty astounding.

MMAjunkie today confirmed with the Nevada State Athletic Commission that the Aug. 26 pay-per-view event at Las Vegas’ T-Mobile Arena drew an official gate of $55,414,865.79. Twitter user @jedigoodman first reported the figures Tuesday evening.

The official attendance of 13,231 included just 137 complimentary tickets and represented an average revenue of $4,188.26 per ticket issued.

All-time boxing great Mayweather (50-0 boxing) earned a 10th-round TKO over McGregor (21-3 MMA, 0-1 boxing) in the much-hyped superfight, which is still expected to set a record as the most-watched pay-per-view event of all time.

The all-time record for a live gate remains Mayweather’s May 2015 win over Manny Pacquiao, which earned nearly $72.2 million in ticket sales.

Mayweather, who retired after the win over McGregor, now owns the top four boxing gates in Nevada history – and six of the state’s top seven totals – according to NSAC records.

For complete coverage of “The Money Fight,” check out the MMA Events section of the site.

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Nate Diaz gives Conor McGregor's 'Money Fight' performance 1 middle finger up

Conor McGregor is no Bruce Lee, says Nate Diaz.

Today, McGregor’s (21-3 MMA, 9-1 UFC, 0-1 boxing) two-time opponent officially weighed in his rival’s blockbuster loss to Floyd Mayweather (50-0 boxing) in the Aug. 26 pay-per-view “Money Fight” blockbuster.

As you might expect, Diaz (19-11 MMA, 14-9 UFC) gives it one middle finger up.

“He punched himself out the same way he lost in the (UFC),” Diaz posted on Instagram, referencing his win over McGregor at UFC 196. “There was no learning (going) on.”

Instagram Photo

McGregor famously faded against Diaz when they first met at welterweight at UFC 196, though McGregor toughed it out for a rematch five months later at UFC 202 and picked up a narrow win.

A rubber match at lightweight, where McGregor holds the UFC belt, could be next – if the Irish champ doesn’t box again first.

McGregor famously invoked Lee as an inspiration for his foray into the square circle against one of the greatest pugilists off all time in Mayweather. But to Diaz, that’s another wolf ticket sold.

“Bruce Lee would’ve never lost like that,” he wrote. “#realninjashit.”

For added effect, Diaz added a promo picture of McGregor with the caption, “I never lose. Either I win or I learn,” a reference to his longtime coach John Kavanagh’s book.

“#overpromotion (expletive) get off the nuts,” Diaz wrote. “This the (expletive) I’m talking about.”

For more on “The Money Fight: Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor,” check out the MMA Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Jose Aldo: No moral victory for Conor McGregor in TKO loss to Floyd Mayweather

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RIO DE JANEIRO – Among the mostly positive feedback from the MMA community after Conor McGregor’s display in his loss to Floyd Mayweather, some of the lightweight champ’s UFC peers stood out for somewhat saltier responses.

One of them was former featherweight champion Jose Aldo, whose series of laugh-crying emojis in the moments after the 10th-round TKO stoppage spoke louder than words. (via Twitter)

Speaking on the matter for the first time Friday, Aldo offered an explanation for the tweets – or something close to that.

“First of all, I didn’t even watch the fight,” Aldo said during the launch of one of his burger shops in Rio de Janeiro. “I was at a football game. It’s a No. 1 sport for me. I’m very passionate about it – Rams and Chargers. So I didn’t even watch the fight. I don’t know. I have people who take care of my social media.

“I can’t even talk about what happened, because I didn’t watch the fight. I talked about it a lot. I was surrounded by boxers where I was, and they talked about the fight. But I didn’t watch it myself.”

Asked directly if that mean he wasn’t the one who tweeted it out, Aldo went with misdirection.

“You know every athlete has people who handle their social media – who work their social media,” Aldo said.

Aldo (26-3 MMA, 8-2 UFC) and McGregor (21-3 MMA, 9-1 UFC) don’t have the friendliest of pasts. Before their UFC 194 fight – which ended with McGregor snapping Aldo’s decade-long unbeaten streak and taking the featherweight belt –  the two traded some serious barbs for months.

Aldo, who just returned home after a stint sharpening up his own boxing skills in California, says he still hasn’t had a chance to watch “The Money Fight.” But as he got home from the game, he got updates about what was happening from a friend.

And the ex-champ says he wasn’t particularly surprised when he caught wind of the result.

“I spent this entire time with them, and they said that was going to happen,” Aldo said. “Conor doesn’t have good cardio, and (they) knew he’s not used to boxing. Mayweather was closed up, just waiting for the time to pounce. The guy hadn’t fought for two years.

“A lot of people talk a lot of crap, like, ‘Oh, he landed many more blows than (Manny) Pacquiao or (Miguel) Cotto and everyone.’ But no one says that (Mayweather) didn’t fight for two years. He didn’t even prepare for the fight. He knew, like everyone at the gym said, that it would be very hard (for McGregor to win) – very, very hard.”

While McGregor did in fact succumb to Mayweather, as most expected, the fact that he managed to survive 10 rounds against the undefeated boxer drew praise from many of his peers. Considering it was McGregor’s professional boxing debut – and all the odds against him – some would say the result was a moral victory.

That group, it turns out, does not include Aldo.

“Of course not,” Aldo said. “Moral? First of all, you try to prove that with someone who’s almost 41, who’s been away (from the sport). Of course, it was a money fight. A moral victory would have been taking on an active boxer, a champion, and then fought him. And then you’d see how he would barely last a round. Because it’s an entirely different sport. We need to put ourselves in our places.

“I’m an MMA athlete. I can’t go tomorrow and say I’m going to do muay Thai in Thailand with a Thai fighter, because I can punch and kick well. There’s no way. Each one in their places. I respect martial arts, so I put myself in my place. I don’t see a moral victory.”

Aldo’s outlook on the showdown is not entirely grim. On the bright side, the former 145-pound kingpin believes it brought added eyeballs to MMA – which, in turn, might translate to some heftier paydays for all parties involved.

“I’m happy he did a big fight, and I think it promoted MMA,” Aldo said. “I’m happy because of that. But as for the fight itself? Nobody liked the way it happened. They thought it was a circus. I don’t know what they’re saying (in Brazil), but in America that was the comment – that it was a circus fight.”

Aldo had made no secret of his interest in starting out a boxing career of his own. In his case, though, he says he wants to start from the bottom and make his way up. Immersing himself in this universe, he explained, did light up a spark in him – but it also showed him how much he has to learn.

“I trained with champions at the gym, at Robert Garcia’s,” Aldo said. “There were practically only champions (there). I got to spar and to train with them and see how boxing is. I don’t think I have the level today to go in there and challenge a champion. First of all, I don’t think I even have the nerve to challenge someone. I think I respect it.

“I think there are many people who have been training their entire lives to get there and fight for a world title in boxing. I’d rather start from scratch and go step-by-step, not disrespecting anyone. Because I think this way I can make it much further.”

For more on the UFC’s upcoming schedule, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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{“playlist”:”http://content.jwplatform.com/jw6/KJ91afjk.xml”}
);

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Source: MMA Junkie