Robert Follis' death weighs heavy on Tim Elliott ahead of UFC 219

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LAS VEGAS – Onetime UFC flyweight title challenger Tim Elliott almost withdrew from his second consecutive octagon bout.

No one would have blamed him. Elliott’s coach, Robert Follis, took his own life two weeks ago.

Elliott (14-8-1 MMA, 3-6 UFC) has decided instead to honor his contract to fight Mark Delarosa (9-0 MMA, 0-0 UFC) at UFC 219.

“I spent two months training every day with a guy, and now he’s gone,” Elliott told MMAjunkie in advance of his UFC Fight Pass-streamed bout on Saturday at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. “I’m never going to get another chance. I don’t want to waste his time, and I don’t want to waste mine.”

Follis’ shocking death, which prompted an outpouring of grief from the MMA industry, came on the heels of an already traumatic month for Elliott, who was scheduled to face Pietro Menga (13-0 MMA, 0-0 UFC) earlier this month at UFC on FOX 26.

When Menga came in heavy, the promotion requested a catchweight bout. Elliott and his coaches declined and were at the brunt of online insults from MMA fans, who berated him for requesting his show and win money to compensate for the lost flyweight bout. In turn, he berated the promotion.

Elliott had just moved from Kansas to Nevada to take his career to the next level. He bought a house for $270,000. He specifically joined up with Follis at Xtreme Couture.

“Now, I’m stuck in a spot where I don’t really want to be here anymore,” Elliott said. “(Follis) was the reason I was here. All the Xtreme guys are awesome, but the fact of the matter is, I moved here to be near him. So I don’t know what I’m going to do.”

When Elliott’s teammates and coaches arrived from Kansas to corner him, there was talk of withdrawing from the bout, a bantamweight contest booked to make his weight cut more manageable after his ill-fated bout at flyweight.

Elliott said he couldn’t sleep, and he’d been “drinking quite a bit and not eating.” When he stepped onto the promotion’s scale at the beginning of fight week, he was 134 pounds, 14 less than when he showed up for the canceled fight.

“I thought that staying at it and keeping my mind busy would make it where I wasn’t stuck in my head so much,” Elliott said. “But there’s little things, like going to the (UFC Performance Institute), that will trigger me, and I get a little emotional. And I never fight with any emotion.”

Eventually, longtime coach and UFC veteran James Krause convinced him to compete. Elliott, though, is uncertain how he’ll feel inside the octagon with such a huge shadow lingering overhead.

“I’m a little worried how my emotions are going to play out,” he said. “I don’t want it to wear me out. I feel if I can just get in there and do what I love to do, then everything will be fine.”

For more on UFC 219, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Trading Shots: What's a fighter to do when an opponent comes in heavy?

Accepting a fight with an opponent who misses weight by a mile has risks, but so does turning it down, as we saw at UFC on FOX 26. In this week’s Trading Shots, MMAjunkie columnist Ben Fowlkes joins retired UFC and WEC fighter Danny Downes to discuss the pros and cons of a tough situation.

Fowlkes: Help me understand something here, Danny. Two fighters failed to make weight for UFC on FOX 26 on Saturday night. One was Pietro Menga, who didn’t even weigh in, reportedly because was so overweight that his opponent, Tim Elliott, refused to accept the fight. Naturally, that led to Elliott taking some heat from fans, especially after he took to Twitter to complain about not getting his win bonus.

Then there’s Josh Emmett, who stepped up as a short-notice replacement against Ricardo Lamas and came in two and a half pounds over. Lamas clearly didn’t like it, but he took the fight anyway. Then he got knocked out cold in the first round.

I’m not saying the extra couple pounds is what beat Lamas, but it does seem to me that fighters face a tough choice when their opponent comes in heavy. If you take the fight and lose, who’s going to remember the extra weight? But if you don’t take the fight you get paid as if you’d lost, plus you make fans and the UFC mad at you.

What’s a fighter supposed to do? And does the answer change if it’s five or six pounds instead of two or three?

Downes: If a fighter wants to be a “company man,” he’s supposed to take the fight no matter what. But as Elliot pointed out, being a company man doesn’t get you much.

There are a lot of factors to take into account when making this decision. The first is, how will it affect the fight itself? Is your opponent a grappler? Are you planning on a wrestling heavy attack? If so, the extra weight could have an effect on the match-up. Especially in the case of Elliot, five or six pounds is a huge difference when you’re already fighting at 125 pounds, whereas a couple pounds to a middleweight might not mean as much.

Along the same lines, you have to think about your job security. If you’re a loss or two from getting cut, you might want to be more conservative. Certain fighters in the UFC have a place on the roster no matter what their record might be. Elliot doesn’t have that luxury.

The same phenomenon we’ve noticed with champions being more conservative in their matchmaking/strategy applies to fighters on the bubble. Being a UFC fighter is more important than being someone who fights “anytime, anywhere.” When that’s the case, you’re willing to take some heat from fans to preserve your roster spot.

What the Elliot situation again highlights is how much of UFC policy is by feel. There’s nothing stopping the UFC from giving Elliot his win money, but it doesn’t have to and so it won’t. Pass out during a weight cut and miss a fight? Well, you’re out of luck. Better hope you can float another couple months of training expenses.

Be careful what you say, too. If you read Elliot’s interview, he wants to make it clear that he doesn’t want to “make the UFC angry.” The culture of fear makes it difficult for fighters to speak up. I suppose fans would just call that “good management,” though.

What about you Ben? I’m sure you played a rec league hockey game with a boo-boo one time, so you know all about competing hurt. Anytime/anywhere may be a dumb way to organize your career, but is it the only way to stay in fans’ and management’s good graces?

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Fowlkes: I did play through a killer hangover last week, so yes, thank you for recognizing my sacrifice.

But you’re right that there’s no reason not to pay a fighter his show and win money when he shows up ready to fight and his opponent doesn’t. No reason, that is, except for a possible fundamental misunderstanding of life from the fighter’s perspective.

Because, see, if you asked most people why a fighter shouldn’t get all his money when his opponent comes in heavy and he turns down the bout on those grounds, I suspect they’d cast it as a matter of incentive. What reason is there for anyone to take the fight in that circumstance if they can get the same money without doing the work? Wouldn’t most of us rather get paid without showing up to our jobs, if given the choice? And wouldn’t that be even more true if our jobs involved getting punched in the face?

That’s the way a normal civilian thinks. We don’t want to fight, so a chance to avoid it without financial penalty sounds too good not to take. What that ignores is that fighters are only there because they really do want to fight. They want to go out there, get in a scrap, then win and move forward. They wouldn’t be at the UFC level if they didn’t think that way.

But it also seems to me that we can’t talk about this without talking about the issue of short-notice replacements.

Emmett took the fight with Lamas after Jose Aldo was pulled to face Max Holloway. Menga accepted the fight with Elliott after Justin Scoggins pulled out hurt. In your favorite story about your own worst weight cut, I seem to recall a short-notice offer being the catalyst.

Does the UFC need to do more to ensure that it’s finding replacements who can actually make the weight? Is that even possible? Because it seems to me that, whether you accept an overweight replacement or don’t, it’s the guy who did everything he agreed to do who usually ends up getting screwed in these situations, one way or another.

Downes: I understand the argument for why fans might not like fighters getting paid for doing nothing. It always amazed me how people are willing to take up the moral vanguard to make sure another person doesn’t make some extra money. If fans weren’t out there protecting the UFC’s finances, who would?

People find it “unfair” that a fighter could be compensated for not competing, but I wonder what they find fair about the current system. Elliot and others have to take all the risk. They front all the costs of their training camp. Outside short-notice fights, that means at least eight weeks or so of investment.

The fighter endures all those costs because of a contact he signed at the beginning of camp. Then, 24-48 hours before the contracted fight, the whole agreement gets ripped up. Now if you don’t acquiesce to this last-minute deal, you lose out. Who benefits from this?

As far as ensuring replacement fighters make weight, I don’t see how you could come up with a system to protect against what we saw this weekend. That is, unless you pay a couple “reserve” fighters to stay ready at all times. That would require more money, though, and the reason we’re debating this in the first place is because promoters don’t want to spend money.

As I know firsthand, replacement fighters are desperate to make the roster, so they’ll put themselves in less than ideal situations. Also, do you want to turn down your first UFC fight because you’re a little heavy when the phone rings? Good luck with that.

Again, the biggest problem is the arbitrariness of it all. The fact that every possible scenario and corresponding payout isn’t codified gives the UFC flexibility, but it also causes unnecessary drama. If fighters knew the consequences (both monetary and in terms of their roster spot) and were given some guarantees (or not), then they could make more informed decisions. Instead, they’re stuck guessing and then begging to the media for some money.

That’s a bad look for everyone involved. Fans may not want fighters to get handout, but the UFC could hand out a little more information.

Ben Fowlkes is MMAjunkie and USA TODAY’s MMA columnist. Danny Downes, a retired UFC and WEC fighter, is an MMAjunkie contributor who has also written for UFC.com and UFC 360. Follow them on twitter at @benfowlkesMMA and @dannyboydownes.

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Tim Elliott feels like UFC 'spit in my face' by not paying full purse after UFC on FOX 26 scratch

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WINNIPEG – Tim Elliott is not happy with his treatment from the UFC following the late scratch of his UFC on FOX 26 bout vs. Pietro Menga.

Elliott (14-8-1 MMA, 3-6 UFC), who hit the 126-pound flyweight limit ahead of Saturday’s event at Bell MTS Place in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, and airs on FOX following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass, will only receive the “show” portion of his fight purse, according to UFC officials.

That doesn’t sit well with Elliott. He said he’s done everything in his power to be an upstanding member of the UFC roster, and considering Menga (13-0 MMA, 0-0 UFC) caused the fight to be canceled by failing to weigh in, the former 125-pound title challenge is perplexed why he won’t be paid every contracted dollar.

“I’ve taken fights on short notice. I’ve fought highly ranked guys. I fought the No. 1 guy in the world my very first fight in the UFC,” Elliott told MMAjunkie. “I fought Demetrious Johnson for a world title after weighing 162 pounds after getting out of ‘The Ultimate Fighter’ house, making weight four times in four weeks. I feel like I’ve been a company man. I feel like I’ve done everything the UFC has asked. I’ve bent over backwards to try to make a career and be a guy that they can rely on and can count on. Then I fight these unreliable guys.

“The fact of the matter is: The money’s there. They were going to pay him his money. They were going to pay me my money. They had money there for a guy to win and a guy to show. Now that a guy’s not showing up, that money’s nowhere to be found. I don’t understand it.

“It hurts, because I feel like I’ve been a guy that is reliable, that they can count on and a guy that will make weight every time no matter what. I feel like I’ve proven that. I feel like I’m getting spit in my face. I feel like I’m not getting the respect that I deserve. They said that they’ve never gave a fighter who showed up and made weight his ‘show’ and ‘win’ money – but that’s not true. Ian McCall made weight; his opponent did not make weight. Ian McCall got his ‘show’ money; Ian McCall got his ‘win’ money. That’s how it should be.”

Elliott said the situation is particularly frustrating because of all the resources he put into training camp for UFC on FOX 26. He moved to Las Vegas, where he bought a house, and was relying on the funding he would receive from winning, the UFC’s Athlete Outfitting Policy and perhaps a fight-night bonus.

After news broke the fight was off, Elliott received criticism for not agreeing to fight Menga at a catchweight. Elliott said he would have been down for that if Menga approached him with the information he wouldn’t make weight. Elliott had his own trouble cutting down to the necessary limit, he said, but got the job done. Because of that, he has little respect for fighters who can’t do the same.

“I just bought a house in Las Vegas. I have a 2-year-old daughter, and I’m trying to make a career out of this,” Elliott said. “I’m getting older. I’m not the guy who says, ‘I’ll fight anybody, any time.’ Them days are over. There was a time where I was that guy, but I feel like I’ve paid my dues in this sport. I’ve been in the UFC for a while. This is my second stint in the UFC, and it just hurts that the promotion don’t get behind tried and true guys that make weight, that show up, that fight short-notice fights. It’s bull(expletive).

“I’m not going to sign any more fights with guys that have missed weight, guys that have backed out,” he continued. “I’m done with that (expletive). I have a family that relies on me, and they need this money, and I need the money. It’s not all about fighting. Don’t get me wrong, I love to fight. It’s one of my favorite things in the world, but I need to be compensated for my time and for my effort. I spent two months in Las Vegas. It was a super expensive camp. I just bought a house there. It’s pretty (expletive) that they’re going to cut a fighter’s pay in half because someone can’t do their job.”

Elliott’s circumstances aren’t completely negative, though. He said the UFC has already offered him a spot on the UFC 219 card Dec. 30 in Las Vegas, but at this point no opponent has been discussed. He said he’s not trying to get on the UFC’s bad side by being vocal about his lack of payment, because he’s simply speaking out about what he feels is right.

If he can fight at UFC 219, Elliott said he would be happy to do so. However, he said the UFC better offer an opponent who has a squeaky-clean history when it comes to missing weight and fight withdrawals, because otherwise he’s not going to step in the octagon.

“I hope they don’t (get angry with me), because I love fighting in the UFC,” Elliot said. “I take pride in my work. I feel like I’m blessed to have the opportunities that I do. They have. They offered me a quick turnaround Dec. 30. I haven’t heard of an opponent yet, but I’m in. I want to fight. I need the money. But, in the future, I feel like guys should be compensated, or guys should be held accountable for missing weight. That’s not the case. It’s easy for a fan to say, ‘Ah, he’s a (expletive). Oh, he’s not a real fighter.’ They don’t know because they’re not real fighters. They have no clue.”

For more on UFC on FOX 26, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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Flyweight Pietro Menga doesn't weigh in for UFC on FOX 26, fight with Tim Elliott scrapped

WINNIPEG – A flyweight fight on the prelims at Saturday’s UFC on FOX 26 card has been scrapped on the day of the weigh-ins.

Pietro Menga (13-0 MMA, 0-0 UFC) will not weigh in today at the early and official weigh-ins for the event. Because of that, his bout against Tim Elliott (14-8-1 MMA, 3-6 UFC) has been scratched from the lineup. A UFC official made the announcement at the official weigh-ins.

UFC on FOX 26 takes place Saturday at Bell MTS Place in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. The main card airs on FOX following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass.

Menga-Elliott was scheduled as part of the FS1 prelims. One of the bouts from the UFC Fight Pass prelims likely will move up to fill out the six-fight FS1 portion of the card, which would leave UFC Fight Pass with just one opening bout.

The undefeated Menga, from England, was to make his UFC debut at the event. He has not fought since a July 2016 knockout of Spencer Hewitt at Bellator 158, and now his layoff before returning will be even longer.

Menga took the fight with Elliott on short notice after Elliott’s original opponent, Justin Scoggins, had to withdraw with an injury. Earlier this week, he told MMAjunkie he wanted to put on an impressive performance in his promotional debut, then get another fight when the UFC returns to London in March.

“I’d like to go in, put on a huge performance, win this fight, go to UFC-London, and really announce myself to the UFC fans and Manchester fans and U.K. fans,” Menga said. “Then, in 2018, I want to be talking about title fights, talking serious about title fights.”

A UFC official confirmed to MMAjunkie Elliott will be paid his show money. But Elliott also quickly started lobbying with the UFC brass on Twitter hoping to be paid both his show and win money.

The UFC on FOX 26 card now includes:

MAIN CARD (FOX, 8 p.m. ET)

  • Robbie Lawler vs. Rafael dos Anjos
  • Josh Emmett vs. Ricardo Lamas
  • Mike Perry vs. Santiago Ponzinibbio
  • Misha Cirkunov vs. Glover Teixeira

PRELIMINARY CARD (FS1, 5 p.m. ET)

  • Jan Blachowicz vs. Jared Cannonier
  • Julian Marquez vs. Darren Stewart
  • Galore Bofando vs. Chad Laprise
  • John Makdessi vs. Abel Trujillo
  • Oluwale Bamgbose vs. Alessio Di Chirico

PRELIMINARY CARD (UFC Fight Pass, 4 p.m. ET)

  • Jordan Mein vs. Erick Silva
  • Danny Roberts vs. Nordine Taleb

For more on UFC on FOX 26, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC newcomer Pietro Menga aims to exploit Tim Elliott's fighting style: 'He's all over the place'

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WINNIPEG – Pietro Menga has only positive things to say about Tim Elliott’s character. When the topic of his fighting style comes up, though, the tone turns far more critical.

Elliott (14-8-1 MMA, 3-6 UFC), who welcomes Menga (13-0 MMA, 0-0 UFC) to the octagon on Saturday at UFC on FOX 26, has one of the more unique and awkward fighting styles on the UFC roster. Several opponents have figured him out, but it’s rarely an easy accomplishment.

Menga said he hopes to make it look like a cakewalk in the FS1-televised flyweight preliminary bout, which takes place at Bell MTS Place in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, prior to the main card on FOX. He said there’s nothing special about the way Elliott competes, and he plans on showing that in his UFC debut.

“I like how he carries himself. He doesn’t try to be something he’s not,” Menga told MMAjunkie. “He’s not fake, and he brings the fight. I don’t personally like the fighting style he’s got. I’m going to show why it doesn’t work on fight night, and I’m going to exploit him with my style and my weapons.

“I don’t like watching (him fight),” he continued. “It’s a professional sport. The fundamentals are clean; it should be pretty to the eye. He’s all over the place. He’s a wild one. But it’s mixed martial arts. We’re all martial artists, and we present ourselves our own way. My style of martial arts is going to be much superior to his style on fight night.”

Menga’s confidence is promising for a fighter who wasn’t even part of the UFC roster as of two weeks ago. Elliott originally was booked to fight Justin Scoggins, but the bout fell apart on short notice when Scoggins suffered a spinal injury. That opened the door for Menga, who has been pleading for his UFC opportunity for several years.

It’s been a long push to get signed by the UFC, Menga said. After the long wait, his plan was to travel to Las Vegas and attend the open tryouts for Season 27 of “The Ultimate Fighter” reality series. He was on the cusp of booking his flight when news of Scoggins’ injury came across the wire, and that’s when he knew his opportunity had finally arrived.

“It’s something I’ve kind of had in the back of my head for a while now with (debuting in the UFC on) short notice,” Menga said. “Once I decided to go through ‘The Ultimate Fighter’ I thought we’d forget about it for now. Then ironically it does happen, and now I’m really grateful for the position I’m in, the opportunity.

“I’d much prefer to go down the route I’ve gone down. I just wanted it to come a lot sooner,” Menga continued. “Either I’ll find my way, or I’ll make one. I wasn’t finding my way, so I decided I was going to make one. Now I’ve gone back to finding a way through UFC matchmakers getting in touch with me. I’m really happy with that.”

It may have taken Menga longer to get into the UFC than anticipated, but he can make up for a lot of lost time in is debut. Elliott is just over a year removed from challenging Demetrious Johnson for the UFC flyweight title and has shared the octagon with a majority of the best fighters at 125 pounds in recent years.

Menga said he’s fully aware of the upside to beating Elliott and admitted he’s glad there’s not much time to over-analyze the importance of the moment.

“It’s amazing. It’s not a crazy build-up that I’ve had for month,” Menga said. “It’s fresh, and I’m good. I’m here to put on a performance and enjoy it. That’s the thing about this. I’m enjoying the process.”

Although he’s primarily concentrated on winning his debut, Menga said he can’t help but allow his mind to linger about what could happen after. The Manchester-born fighter would like nothing more than to compete at UFC Fight Night 127 in London on March 17, and if all goes well there, he said he’s looking at himself as a serious title contender by this time next year.

“I’d like to go in, put on a huge performance, win this fight, go to UFC-London, and really announce myself to the UFC fans and Manchester fans and UK fans,” Menga said. “Then, in 2018, I want to be talking about title fights, talking serious about title fights.”

For more on UFC on FOX 26, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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UFC on FOX 26's Tim Elliott calls for 'TUF' victory paycheck in future seasons

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WINNIPEG – When the UFC crowned its first-ever women’s flyweight champion earlier this month, the feel-good story was of champ Nicco Montano going from rags to riches.

But for onetime UFC flyweight title contender Tim Elliott, the conclusion of “The Ultimate Fighter 26” brought a sour taste to his mouth when he thought of the money he lost competing on the reality show.

Elliott, who gave champ Demetrious Johnson a run for his money after winning “TUF 24,” believes there should be a check at the end of the reality show instead of an award.

“I got a piece of glass that says I won … and two motorcycles,” Elliott told MMAjunkie in advance of his FS1-televised fight against Pietro Menga at UFC on FOX 26, which takes place Saturday at Bell MTS Place in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

When Elliott (14-8-1 MMA, 3-6 UFC) was cast on the show, the gold at the end of the rainbow was the UFC flyweight title; the show’s winner was guaranteed a shot at Johnson.

In the meantime, contestants could count on $5,000 checks for their exhibition fights.

Elliott’s heart sank when he heard there would be a $250,000 payout for the winner of the show’s next season, which featured returning UFC welterweights looking for a shot at redemption.

To be fair, Elliott did earn a disclosed $100,000 for fighting Johnson, the same amount the finalists on “TUF 26” earned. And he got a bump in pay for his next fight, earning $25,000 to show and win.

Still, watching Roxanne Modaferri capture the same amount for a short-notice fight, Elliott couldn’t help but feel short-changed, and he vented about it (via Twitter).

Now Elliott is convinced the end-of-show bonus previously promised by the UFC should become a regular thing.

“I would much rather have $250,000,” he said. “They said my prize was to get Demetrious, which was great. But my pay was for that fight. My pay was for fighting Demetrious. I didn’t get anything really for winning.

“It kind of sucks, because I spent time away from my kid. I have a 2-year-old daughter, and I’m a stay-at-home dad. I spend every second with my kid, and to leave her for seven weeks for $20,000 is not worth it.

“It kind of hurt. But I was a guy who was let go by the UFC once before, and I was lucky enough to get re-hired. So I don’t have any hard feelings with the UFC. I think fighters should get their worth, and if I keep winning, I’ll get mine.”

Originally scheduled to face Justin Scoggins (11-4 MMA, 4-4 UFC), Elliott was forced to reset his career expectations for the fight when Scoggins withdrew with an injury. A meeting with undefeated UFC newcomer Menga (13-0 MMA, 0-0 UFC) offers plenty of danger for a veteran like Elliott, so he will need to be in top form.

After all, if Elliott can’t stay in the win column, it will be really hard to meet his UFC goals, no matter what comes down the road with the reality show.

For more on UFC on FOX 26, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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Next week's UFC on FOX 26 lineup in Winnipeg undergoes slew of changes

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Next week’s UFC on FOX 26 lineup has undergone a number of changes.

Officials today announced the slew of new matchups for the card.

UFC on FOX 26 takes place Dec. 16 at MTS Centre in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. It airs on FOX following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass.

As reported on Monday, Justin Scoggins (11-4 MMA, 4-4 UFC) recently announced a back injury has forced him out of his fight with flyweight Tim Elliott (14-8-1 MMA, 3-6 UFC). As a result, promotional newcomer and undefeated recent Bellator fighter Pietro Menga (13-0 MMA, 0-0 UFC) has stepped in as a replacement.

Officials also confirmed Josh Emmett (12-1 MMA, 3-1 UFC) has been tapped for the co-headliner against featherweight Ricardo Lamas (18-5 MMA, 9-3 UFC). Lamas was originally was supposed to fight Jose Aldo (26-3 MMA, 8-2 UFC), but the former UFC champion recently had fill-in duties in this past weekend’s UFC 218 headliner, where he lost to current titleholder Max Holloway.

Additionally, Darren Stewart (7-2 MMA, 0-2 UFC) replaces Vitor Miranda (12-6 MA, 3-3 UFC) against middleweight Julian Marquez (6-1 MMA, 0-0 UFC). A reason wasn’t given for Miranda’s withdrawal.

Finally, welterweight Sultan Aliev (14-2 MMA, 1-1 UFC) is out of his fight against Nordine Taleb (13-4 MMA, 5-2 UFC), and Sheldon Westcott (9-3-1 MMA, 1-2 UFC) has been scratched from his bout from Danny Roberts (14-2 MMA, 3-1 UFC) – both for undisclosed reasons. As a result, Taleb and Roberts are now slated to fight each other.

The official UFC on FOX 26 lineup now includes:

MAIN CARD (FOX, 8 p.m. ET)

  • Robbie Lawler vs. Rafael dos Anjos
  • Josh Emmett vs. Ricardo Lamas
  • Mike Perry vs. Santiago Ponzinibbio
  • Misha Cirkunov vs. Glover Teixeira

PRELIMINARY CARD (FS1, 5 p.m. ET)

  • Jan Blachowicz vs. Jared Cannonier
  • Julian Marquez vs. Darren Stewart
  • Galore Bofando vs. Chad Laprise
  • Tim Elliott vs. Pietro Menga
  • John Makdessi vs. Abel Trujillo
  • Oluwale Bamgbose vs. Alessio Di Chirico

PRELIMINARY CARD (UFC Fight Pass, 4 p.m. ET)

  • Jordan Mein vs. Erick Silva
  • Danny Roberts vs. Nordine Taleb

For more on UFC on FOX 26, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie