Godbeer-Harris rebooked for UFC 217, Hendricks-Borrachinha rounds out main card

A heavyweight matchup expected to take place at UFC 216 has been booked again for UFC 217, instead.

UFC officials today announced that Mark Godbeer and Walt Harris fill face off on the FS1-televised prelims of next month’s UFC 217 event, which takes place Nov. 4 at Madison Square Garden in New York.

With the new contest, a middleweight matchup between Johny Hendricks (18-7 MMA, 13-7 UFC) and Paulo Borrachinha (10-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) has been moved up to the evening’s pay-per-view main card.

Godbeer and Harris were slated to meet at this past weekend’s UFC 216 before a Derrick Lewis back injury flared up the day of the contest, and Harris was plucked from the prelim bout and placed into a main card matchup with top contender Fabricio Werdum, who needed just 65 seconds to finish the fight via armbar.

Hendricks will look to untie the 1-1 record that he’s amassed since moving up to the UFC’s middleweight division. After a decision win over Hector Lombard at UFC Fight Night 105, Hendricks was knocked out by Tim Boetsch in the second round of their UFC Fight Night 112 encounter.

Borrachinha, in turn, comes impressive off back-to-back UFC wins – which cap off an undefeated professional record. The 25-year-old fighter followed a quick knockout over Garreth McLellan, at UFC Fight Night 106, with another TKO, this time over Oluwale Bamgbose, at June’s UFC 212. He has finished all of his fights to date.

The full UFC 217 lineup includes:

MAIN CARD (Pay-per-view, 10 p.m. ET)

  • Champ Michael Bisping vs. Georges St-Pierre – for middleweight title
  • Champ Cody Garbrandt vs. T.J. Dillashaw – for bantamweight title
  • Champ Joanna Jedrzejczyk vs. Rose Namajunas – for women’s strawweight title
  • Jorge Masvidal vs. Stephen Thompson
  • Paulo Borrachinha vs. Johny Hendricks

PRELIMINARY CARD (FS1, 8 p.m. ET)

  • Joseph Duffy vs. James Vick
  • Mark Godbeer vs. Walt Harris
  • Ion Cutelaba vs. Michal Oleksiejczuk
  • Randy Brown vs. Mickey Gall

PRELIMINARY CARD (UFC Fight Pass, 6:30 p.m. ET)

  • Curtis Blaydes vs. Aleksei Oleinik
  • Corey Anderson vs. Patrick Cummins
  • Ricardo Ramos vs. Aiemann Zahabi

For more on UFC 217, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Stream or download MMAjunkie Radio #2541 with Lyoto Machida, Johny Hendricks, Michael Johnson

Stream or download Wednesday’s episode of MMAjunkie Radio with guests Lyoto Machida, Johny Hendricks and Michael Johnson.

Machida headlines UFC Fight Night 119 vs. Derek Brunson on Oct. 28. Hendricks competes Nov. 4 at UFC 217 vs. Paulo Borrachinha. Johnson, looking to compete in December, discussed his possibilities at lightweight or featherweight if he drops down a division.

You can stream the entire episode on AudioBoom.com or listen below.

Filed under: News, Radio, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Ex-UFC champ Johny Hendricks opens up on move to Jackson Wink MMA

After a loss to Tim Boetsch that left his recent UFC record at 2-4, Johny Hendricks decided he could no longer afford to walk the same path. He needed a change of scenery from his native Texas.

“I really didn’t want to leave my kids,” Hendricks on Wednesday told MMAjunkie Radio. “But it’s to a point to where, do I want to just compete, or do I want to win again?”

Once the top man at 170 pounds, the former champion Hendrick (18-7 MMA, 13-7 UFC) is running out of options as he tries to pull out of a long career slide. A fight against unbeaten Paulo Borrachinha (10-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) at UFC 217 could be his last chance to correct course.

Hendricks, 34, seems to grasp the stakes. He made headlines earlier this month by traveling to Albuquerque, N.M., for a residency with the famed Jackson Wink MMA Academy, which has trained two of his former opponents.

“I know I can fight better,” Hendricks said. “I’ve proven it, but I’ve got to do it consistently now.”

In the buildup to the Nov. 4 fight, headlined by his two-time foe Georges St-Pierre at Madison Square Garden in New York, Henricks plans to split time between New Mexico and Texas, driving home on the weekends to see his family. It’s an uncomfortable move, but a necessary one. By making it, Hendricks said he primarily sought out something he lacked in previous camps: sparring partners.

“That’s my problem,” Hendricks said. “One camp might be really good, but the next one sucks, and the reason why is I can’t get any training partners.”

Earlier in his career, when his management was overseen by Team Takedown, Hendricks was able to tailor his work in the gym toward his opponents. He had sparring partners flown out to the team’s facility in Arlington, Texas.

Since the team’s collapse amid a fight with its management, Hendricks largely has been on his own. Although he’s continued to work with individual coaches, he’s struggled to rebuild a reliable infrastructure around his preparation.

When he thought about how to fix the problem, Jackson Wink immediately came to mind. He remembered facing fighters from the team and being impressed by the coaching that was coming from their corners. He figured if anything, coaches Greg Jackson and Mike Winkeljohn didn’t need a refresher on what he brought to the table.

Plus, the Southwestern facility is a one-stop shop for UFC fighters and coaches. It’s home to some of the brightest talent in the sport.

Through a mutual friend, Hendricks reached out to Winkeljohn, who cleared the request through the rest of the team before giving the green light.

Hendricks drove to Albuquerque and stayed with UFC welterweight Donald Cerrone, who owns the “BMF” training facility and ranch that has housed many Jackson Wink fighters.

Although Hendricks was uncertain at the response he’d receive from team members, he said he was eagerly welcomed. Then, everyone got to work.

Hendricks trained with established fighters such as Cerrone and said he also got good looks from up-and-comers looking to give him a tough time in the cage.

“I sparred 12 times in a week,” Hendricks said. “Sometimes, that’s what my whole camp is. By the end of the week, I’m starting to pick up things.”

Now, Hendricks is certain he made the right choice. He said even the support staff is on a different level for fighters as they prepare for bouts.

“They have people that can work on you there, so after practice, you have something that’s not feeling right, they do their job, and by the next day, it’s almost healed,” Hendricks said. “That’s going to further my career, as well. Just training smarter.”

Hendricks said Jackson has a plan for his training at the gym and when he returns home. But Hendricks already gets the sense that he’s turning a corner in the way he fights.

It took a blowout loss to Boetsch to get him there, but Hendricks is resolved to see through his resolution to train the way he needs to ensure victory.

“I just took a step back and said this is where I need to be,” Hendricks said. “If I want to do what I want to do, I have to make that sacrifice.”

For more on UFC 217, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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Filed under: Featured, News, Radio Highlight, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Watch MMAjunkie Radio here (1 p.m. ET) with Lyoto Machida, Johny Hendricks, Michael Johnson

Filed under: News, Videos

MMAjunkie Radio kicks off today at 1 p.m. ET (10 a.m. PT) with guests Lyoto Machida, Johny Hendricks and Michael Johnson.

Former UFC light heavyweight champion Machida headlines UFC Fight Night 119 on Oct. 28 against Derek Brunson. Former UFC welterweight champ Hendricks competes on Nov. 4 vs. Paulo Borrachinha at UFC 217. Meanwhile, Johnson is looking to make the move to featherweight and will update us on his progress and any potential targets he might like to face.

MMAjunkie Radio airs from 1 to 3 p.m. ET (10 a.m. to noon PT), live from Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. You can watch and listen live on MMAjunkie’s Facebook and YouTube pages. Additionally, SiriusXM Rush (Ch. 93) carries a replay later in the day (8-10 p.m. ET) and the following morning (7-9 a.m. ET), or catch a replay on demand.

MMAjunkie Radio listener guide:

  • HOW TO WATCH (ON WEB): Watch a live stream on MMAjunkie’s Facebook or YouTube pages.
  • HOW TO CALL: MMAjunkie Radio takes phone calls from listeners throughout the show. Call into the MMAjunkie Radio hotline at (866) 522-2846.
  • HOW TO DISCUSS: The MMAjunkie MMA Forums has a section devoted solely to MMAjunkie Radio. Stop by the MMAjunkie Radio forum to discuss the show, interact with the hosts, suggest future guests and catch up on the latest MMAjunkie Radio news.
  • HOW TO VISIT THE SHOW: You can watch MMAjunkie Radio live and in person at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino on the world-famous Las Vegas Strip. The booth is located in the resort’s Race & Sports Book next to the Mandalay Bay poker room. To plan a trip to Sin City and MMAjunkie Radio, go to www.mandalaybay.com.

Filed under: News, Videos
Source: MMA Junkie

Former UFC champ Johny Hendricks packs up trailer and heads for Jackson-Wink MMA

Dann StuppPerhaps a change of scenery will do some good for former UFC welterweight champion Johny Hendricks.

Hendricks (18-7 MMA, 13-7 UFC), who recently dropped out of the USA TODAY Sports/MMAjunkie MMA welterweight rankings, is currently stuck in a 1-4 skid and has missed weight in three of his past four bouts; the lone fight he made weight for actually took place at middleweight. However, in his most recent bout – against middleweight Tim Boetsch at UFC Fight Night 112 in June – he also failed to make weight and tipped the scale at 188 pounds before a second-round TKO loss.

The 34-year-old, who had a brief UFC title reign in 2014, is now headed to Greg Jackson and Mike Winkeljohn’s famed camp in Albuquerque, N.M. ahead of his next bout.

He made the announcement on Sunday (via Twitter):

“Loading up, and heading to Jackson-Wink’s MMA,” Hendricks says in the video. “I’m super excited. I can’t wait to get there. I’ll keep you all posted.”

MMAjunkie could not immediately reach Hendricks to determine if it’s a temporary or full-time move. “Big Rigg” is a longtime Team Takedown member who recently branched out with coach Steven Wright.

Hendricks (18-7 MMA, 13-7 UFC) next fights middleweight Paulo Borrachinha (10-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) at UFC 217. The event takes place Nov. 4 at Madison Square Garden in New York City, and the main card airs on pay-per-view following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass.

With a loaded fight card, Hendricks, a two-time NCAA Division I national wrestling champion, is expected to fight on the FS1 prelims. And given his recent results, he could be fighting for his UFC job at the big event.

For more on UFC 217, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Filed under: Blue Corner, Featured Videos, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Former champion Johny Hendricks set to meet Brazil's Paulo Borrachinha at UFC 217

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It may not be Vitor Belfort, but up-and-comer Paulo Borrachinha has managed to land himself another ex-champ.

The Brazilian middleweight meets former welterweight titleholder Johny Hendricks (18-7 MMA, 13-7 UFC) at UFC 217, which takes place Nov. 4 at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The matchup, which was confirmed by MMAjunkie with Borrachinha’s (10-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) camp, was first reported by Combate.com. UFC officials have not made a formal announcement of the booking.

Hendricks will look to untie the 1-1 record that he’s amassed since moving up to the UFC’s middleweight division. After a decision win over Hector Lombard at UFC Fight Night 105, Hendricks was knocked out by Tim Boetsch in the second round of their UFC Fight Night 112 encounter.

It’s a delicate moment for the 33-year-old fighter. After multiple issues making the 170-pound limit, he also failed to make weight for his 185-pound bout with Boetsch. Hendricks, who beat fellow ex-champ Robbie Lawler at UFC 171 to earn the vacant 170-pound title, was on a three-fight skid before the move up.

Paulo Borrachinha

Borrachinha, in turn, comes impressive off back-to-back UFC wins – which cap off an undefeated professional record. The 25-year-old fighter followed a quick knockout over Garreth McLellan, at UFC Fight Night 106, with another TKO, this time over Oluwale Bamgbose, at June’s UFC 212. He has finished all of his fights to date.

For more on UFC 217, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Twitter Mailbag: On why UFC 214 is suddenly stacked, Felice Herrig's complaint and more

UFC 214 just got even more exciting. Is that at least partially because a few of its primary elements are slightly unreliable? Plus, where can Johny Hendricks go from here? And is there a single good reason for B.J. Penn to fight again?

All that and more in this week’s Twitter Mailbag. To ask a question of your own, tweet to @BenFowlkesMMA.

Let’s deal with the facts here. UFC 214 is headlined by Jon Jones fighting to reclaim his light heavyweight title. Further down the card, you’ve got Cristiane Justino fighting a replacement from another organization and weight class. So yeah, you can bet your Butterfinger the Tyron Woodley vs. Demian Maia welterweight title fight is something of a backup.

Can you blame the UFC if that’s the idea? Jones has proven to be unreliable. Justino has a way of reminding opponents of some very important task they need to run off and complete. The lesson the UFC learned from injury-ravaged years past is that you’d better have a Plan B if you want to sell pay-per-views.

And really, this is a pretty good one. Now UFC 214 could withstand some hits. It’s not like some other cards we’ve seen, where we’re never more than one tweaked knee from canceling the whole thing. You want to have a big fight card in the middle of the summer? This is how you do it. Now let’s just everybody try to stay healthy until then.

Tonya Evinger is skilled and ornery enough that you can never count her out completely. That said, this is a tough one. Usually Evinger wins with a style of grappling that looks like what your big sister would have done to you if she were a black belt. It’s not the flashiest or the slickest ground game you’ve ever seen, but it is mean and relentless.

Thing is, I don’t know how that’s going to work against Cristiane Justino. “Cyborg” will be bigger and stronger than Evinger, and it’s not as if she’s a novice on the ground. You’re not just going to bully that woman, and I doubt Evinger wants to stand there and trade punches with her for too long.

Credit to Evinger for taking the fight, especially since we just saw a champion literally give up the belt without a fight just to avoid it. But she’s going to have a tough night of work on July 29.

It’s somewhere in between. The California State Athletic Commission, led by executive director Andy Foster, himself a former professional MMA fighter, has made this issue a priority of late. The CSAC has been uncommonly proactive about trying to mitigate the dangers of extreme weight-cutting in MMA, and this is a part of that effort.

It’s an admirable one, too. If we actually want to do something about this problem, regulators can’t keep turning a blind eye for the sake of getting along with promoters. The question is whether or not one commission can spur a change throughout the entire sport.

That’s the problem with the state commission approach to regulating this sport. Standards differ between athletic commissions, sometimes greatly. So does funding and experience and the level of professionalism. Just ask Cortney Casey about her experiences with Texas, and you’ll see what I mean.

I’m glad to see California flexing its regulator muscle in the name of athlete health and safety. But what happens if Renan Barao wants to fight at bantamweight in Brazil next? Or in Pennsylvania? Or in Florida? I like what California is trying to do, but it can’t do it alone.

I won’t speculate on what the goal was in having Tony Ferguson sit at the FOX Sports desk and grill a potential future opponent on TV, but I can tell you what the pros and cons of the situation were in the end. You ready?

Pro: Now there’s some heat between Ferguson and Kevin Lee, which might prove handy in promoting a fight between them soon.

Con: Remember that part where Lee asked if they could “put a real journalist on” rather than having a fellow fighter masquerade as one for the sake of that interview? Turned out the answer was no, they couldn’t. Which, if I’m a viewer, really serves to remind me what I’m actually watching here.

You know how pro wrestling used to have those shows within the show, where it looked like a real news desk with two or three pundits talking and doing “interviews,” but in reality everyone was working for the wrestling promoter and their job was to push these narratives along? This felt a lot like that.

It was another reminder that we’re dealing with state-run TV here. And I guess that’s fine if that’s how FOX Sports (which just axed all its writers, thereby giving up the claim that it was still pursuing actual sports journalism, even if it was only online) and the UFC want to play.

Just seems like a bummer for fans, because this is pretty much the only TV show left in America that’s focused solely on this sport, and you can’t even watch it without being reminded that it’s all one big commercial.

It might be a valid complaint, but I can’t help but wish it had come from someone else.

Right now, Felice Herrig is a better fighter than she’s ever been. She’s won three straight in the UFC, and her last two victories came against undefeated opponents. But she feels like the promotional push from the UFC isn’t there, in part because it would rather focus on the young and the beautiful, regardless of what their records look like.

There’s something to that criticism, but I can recall a time not so long ago when Herrig was on the other end of it. She seemed content to exploit that dynamic and ignore the criticism from it before she was in the UFC. Now that she’s there and winning fights, it seems like she’s changed her mind.

The fight game is a sales business at heart, and everyone in it sells what they can. I’m not going to criticize Herrig for using sex appeal to market herself earlier in her career, but I would expect her to be a little more understanding when other people – whether it’s younger fighters or the UFC itself – do the same. Now that she’s stacking up meaningful wins, maybe the thing for her to do is focus on where that can take her.

I read that Johny Hendricks blamed his latest weigh-in miss on a fever, and I have no real reason to doubt that he’s telling the truth. If he hadn’t missed weight all those other times, people might be inclined to cut him some slack on this one.

Hendricks’ career decline is one of the sharpest we’ve ever seen in this sport. It’s not just one bad night here or there. This is a habitual thing for him now, and he’s already been given more latitude than lots of other fighters have gotten.

The trouble is that, as a former champion, the UFC is going to expect him to fight someone with a name. There aren’t any easy ones waiting for him out there. He has to know that. Maybe the thing for him to do now is be honest about himself about what it’s going to take to be ready for it.

I think the punishment for watching those fights was contained in the fights themselves. If not, I sure wish we’d known in advance what kind of trade we were making. I think most of us would have chosen to keep Donald Cerrone vs. Robbie Lawler intact. But maybe this pairing is too glorious to ever pass out of the realm of fantasy and into reality.

Up until recently I would have answered the first part of this question with Justin Gaethje. Now the UFC’s scooped him up, and it’s not hard to see why, since the guy has an exciting style that seems designed to make sure no one leaves the cage without a headache – including the referee if he gets too close to the backflip celebration.

If I can’t say Gaethje anymore, guess I have to go with the obvious choice: Baruto.

As for who I like to write about the most, I can’t say I’m familiar with this McDoogle fellow you mentioned. There’s a fighter by the name of Conor McGregor who fans seem to really like to read about. Then there are fighters whose honesty and intelligence and willingness to engage in self-reflection makes them interesting interview subjects.

But honestly, I like talking to the fighters who are at least a few years removed from active careers. I did a lot of it for this story on PRIDE a few months ago, and it reminded me that you get a different perspective from people who can stand at a certain point removed from it all. They’re also more likely to tell you the truth, if only because there are fewer people around who can punish them for it.

I can give you several bad ones.

– Maybe B.J. Penn feels like he doesn’t know who he is if he’s not a fighter.
– Maybe he can’t stand the thought of going out on this terrible losing streak.
– Maybe he feels like he needs the training to keep his life together, and he can’t stay motivated for the training without the promise of a fight at the end.
– Maybe he likes the paychecks and the attention and the adrenaline rush.

All of those are understandable to some extent, but not one is a good enough reason to keep going in a sport this brutal and unforgiving.

I’m with you. Michael Chiesa is an exciting fighter and a likable guy, and I think there are plenty of other fights available for him in possibly the most talent-rich division in all of MMA. Pick a name out of a hat. Is it someone good? Probably. Will that person rile you up by merely mentioning  you have a mother? Maybe. And we’re off. It beats waiting half a year to fight a guy you just fought.

Ben Fowlkes is MMAjunkie and USA TODAY’s MMA columnist. Follow him on Twitter at @BenFowlkesMMA. Twitter Mailbag appears every Thursday on MMAjunkie.

Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 112 medical suspensions: Chiesa, Boetsch, Herrig get 180-day terms

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Six fighters from Sunday’s UFC Fight Night 112 event face mandatory medical suspensions that could stretch up to six months.

MMAjunkie today requested and obtained the list of suspensions from the Oklahoma State Athletic Commission, which oversaw the event.

UFC Fight Night 112 took place at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Okla., and the main card aired on FS1 following prelims on FS2 and UFC Fight Pass.

Headliner Michael Chiesa (14-3 MMA, 7-3 UFC), who suffered a controversial first-round submission loss to lightweight Kevin Lee (16-2 MMA, 9-2 UFC), was among the fighters receiving 180-day terms.

The full list of medical suspensions included:

  • Michael Chiesa: suspended 180 days due to a possible left-shoulder injury, though a doctor can clear him early; regardless, 30 days with no contact for 21 days due to a scalp laceration
  • Tim Boetsch: suspended 180 days due to possible right-foot and shin injuries, though a doctor can clear him early
  • Johny Hendricks: suspended for 30 days with no contact for 21 days for precautionary reasons
  • Felice Herrig: suspended 180 days due to a possible left-wrist injury, though a doctor can clear her early; regardless, 30 days with no contact for 21 days for precautionary reasons
  • Justine Kish: suspended for 30 days with no contact for 21 days due to a left-eyebrow laceration
  • Joachim Christensen: suspended for 45 days with no contact for 30 days for precautionary reasons
  • B.J. Penn: suspended for 45 days with no contact for 30 days for precautionary reasons
  • Marvin Vettori: suspended for 30 days with no contact for 21 days for precautionary reasons
  • Vitor Miranda: suspended 180 days due to a possible right-ankle injury, though a doctor can clear him early; regardless, 30 days with no contact for 21 days due to left-ear and nasal lacerations
  • Devin Powell: suspended 180 days due to possible left-ankle injury, though a doctor can clear him early
  • Michel Quinones: suspended for 45 days with no contact for 30 days for precautionary reasons
  • Johnny Case: suspended 180 days due to a possible hand, foot/ankle and nose injuries, though a doctor can clear him early; regardless, 60 days with no contact for 45 days due to a left-orbital laceration
  • Tony Martin: suspended for 30 days with no contact for 21 days for precautionary reasons
  • Josh Stansbury: suspended for 45 days with no contact for 30 days for precautionary reasons

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 112 video highlights: Tim Boetsch vs. Johny Hendricks

Filed under: Featured Videos, News, UFC, Videos

Unfortunately for Johny Hendricks (18-7 MMA, 13-7 UFC), he was on the business end of a fight-changing head kick, as Tim Boetsch (21-11 MMA, 12-10 UFC) rocked Hendricks with the kick and put him away with follow-up punches to get the TKO win 46 seconds into Round 2.

The catchweight bout (Hendricks missed the middleweight limit) was the co-main event of today’s UFC Fight Night 112 event at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Okla. It aired on FS1 following prelims on FS2 and UFC Fight Pass.

Check out the highlights above.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Filed under: Featured Videos, News, UFC, Videos
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 112 results: Head kick jump-starts Tim Boetsch's TKO of Johny Hendricks

In a fight between former wrestlers Tim Boetsch and Johny Hendricks, it was a head kick that made all the difference.

Unfortunately for Hendricks (18-7 MMA, 13-7 UFC), he was on the business end of that kick, as Boetsch (21-11 MMA, 12-10 UFC) rocked Hendricks with the kick early in the second and put him away with follow-up punches to get the TKO win 46 seconds into Round 2.

The catchweight bout (Hendricks missed the middleweight limit) was the co-main event of today’s UFC Fight Night 112 event at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Okla. It aired on FS1 following prelims on FS2 and UFC Fight Pass.

Boetsch was the busier fighter early on, peppering Hendricks with short punches and kicks to the legs and body in the opening round, while Hendricks followed him around looking to land his signature left hand.

Early in the second, that’s when Boetsch caught Hendricks by surprise with a right leg head kick. The blow sent Hendricks reeling toward the fence, and a looping Boetsch right hand seemed to graze his skull just enough to put Hendricks down on one knee.

Hendricks would get up just as Boetsch came in for the finish, but he couldn’t do much more than cover up as Boetsch hammered him with heavy uppercuts until Hendricks collapsed. At that point, referee Kevin MacDonald had no choice but the step in and wave it off, giving Boetsch the TKO win less than a minute into the second frame.

The win is Boetsch’s first since his submission loss to Renato Souza earlier this year. Hendricks has now lost four of his last five, missing weight for three of his last four.

Up-to-the-minute UFC Fight Night 112 results include:

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

(MMAjunkie’s John Morgan contributed to this report on site in Oklahoma City.)

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie