Category Archives: Fabricio Werdum

Derrick Lewis returns from 'retirement,' meets ex-champ Fabricio Werdum at UFC 216

A heavyweight bout between Derrick Lewis and former UFC champion Fabricio Werdum is the latest addition to October’s UFC 216 lineup.

Lewis (18-5 MMA, 9-3 UFC) today confirmed the matchup with Werdum (21-7-1 MMA, 9-4 UFC) following an initial report from MMAFighting.com (via Instagram):

Instagram Photo

UFC 216 takes place Oct. 7 at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. The main card airs on pay-per-view following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass, though the bout order hasn’t been finalized.

Lewis, No. 12 in the latest USA TODAY Sports/MMAjunkie MMA heavyweight rankings, will come out of a short-lived retirement for the bout. After putting together an impressive six-fight winning streak inside the octagon, “The Black Beast” suffered a fourth-round TKO to Mark Hunt in June’s UFC Fight Night 110 headliner. He retired inside the cage but quickly took back his announcement.

No. 3-ranked Werdum, meanwhile, is coming off a narrow majority decision loss to Alistair Overeem in their trilogy bout at UFC 213 in July. The Brazilian is 1-1 since he dropped the UFC heavyweight title to Stipe Miocic in May 2016.

The latest UFC 216 lineup includes:

  • Tony Ferguson vs. Kevin Lee – for interim lightweight title
  • Will Brooks vs. Nik Lentz
  • Bobby Green vs. Lando Vannata
  • Beneil Dariush vs. Evan Dunham
  • Thales Leites vs. Brad Tavares
  • Magomed Bibulatov vs. John Moraga
  • Marco Beltran vs. Matt Schnell
  • Mark Godbeer vs. Walt Harris
  • Jessica Eye vs. Paige VanZant
  • Derrick Lewis vs. Fabricio Werdum

For more on UFC 216, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Mark Hunt wanted Fabricio Werdum rematch in Sydney, but 'he is getting a manicure'

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Mark Hunt was seeking a bout with a top-ranked heavyweight at UFC Fight Night in Sydney later this year. Unfortunately, no one on his wish list was available, so he was forced to settle for Marcin Tybura as an opponent.

Although Hunt (13-11-1 MMA, 8-5-1 UFC) has spent more than two decades competing in combat sports and is not one to avoid any fight, he did have his sights set on a rematch with Fabricio Werdum (21-7-1 MMA, 9-4 UFC), who beat him by second-round knockout in a short-notice fight at UFC 180 in November 2014.

Hunt said he was angling for another fight against the Brazilian at the Sydney event – or possibly even in Japan next month. However, he claims Werdum didn’t want it (and instead is “getting a manicure), and the fight with Tybura (16-2 MMA, 3-1 UFC) was then booked (via Instagram):

Instagram Photo

UFC Fight Night in Sydney, which takes place Nov. 19 at Qudos Bank Arena, marks the 11th time the UFC has headed to Australia and fourth to Sydney. Due to the time change, the card airs on Nov. 18 in the U.S. on FS1 following early prelims on UFC Fight Pass.

The UFC recently made the bout official (via Twitter):

Hunt, No. 10 in the latest USA TODAY Sports/MMAjunkie MMA heavyweight rankings, is coming off a fourth-round TKO win over Derrick Lewis at UFC Fight Night 110 in June. The fight snapped a two-fight skid for “The Super Samoan” and put him in position to headline an event in Australia for the fourth time.

For more on UFC Fight Night in Sydney, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC heavyweight Aleksei Oleinik wants Mark Hunt, but super-troll Hunt wants Fabricio Werdum

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Nearly a month after his big win over Travis Browne at UFC 213, Aleksei Oleinik knows the challenge he wants next. Problem is, it seems to be one-way traffic for him.

Oleinik (52-10-1 MMA, 4-1 UFC) got into a heavyweight slugfest with Browne (18-7-1 MMA, 9-7-1 UFC) to close out the UFC 213 prelims in July and finished him with a second-round rear-naked choke. He thinks that win should get him a fight with Mark Hunt.

Hunt (13-11-1 MMA, 8-5-1 UFC) is coming off a fourth-round TKO of Derrick Lewis (18-5 MMA, 9-3 UFC) in the UFC Fight Night 110 main event in June. But Hunt isn’t interested in Oleinik. Instead, he wants former champ Fabricio Werdum (21-7-1 MMA, 9-4 UFC).

When Oleinik called Hunt out on social media, Hunt responded on Facebook … and rather brilliantly trolled Oleinik’s Instagram handle by spelling it “Alexeyholeydik.” In the comments, after Oleinik replied, Hunt said he’d prefer to wait to fight him till he’s in the UFC’s top five.

So which fight would you rather see? Hunt vs. Oleinik? Or Hunt vs. Werdum? Weigh in on it in the poll below.

For more on the UFC’s upcoming schedule, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Twitter Mailbag: Rumors of a Lesnar return, a clash of rivals at UFC 214, and more

Is Brock Lesnar really coming back? Is UFC 214 really a clash between two 205-pounders who will eventually be heavyweights together? Would Dana White’s Contender Series be a good replacement for “The Ultimate Fighter”? Is Demian Maia going to get his whole head knocked off?

All that and more in this week’s Twitter Mailbag. To ask a question of your own, tweet to @BenFowlkesMMA.

Word from the UFC is that, regardless of claims to the contrary, Brock Lesnar has not reentered the USADA testing pool. And if you’re thinking that it might not matter, since the UFC gave him a pass on that last time, please remind yourself that that decision has since been used against the UFC in both a lawsuit and a congressional hearing.

I know the UFC is desperate for heavyweights and pay-per-view buys, but Lesnar feels like more trouble than he’s worth. The last time we saw him, he failed two different drug tests and laid on top of Mark Hunt for three rounds. Another one of his temporary returns doesn’t interest me one bit.

 

I see two clear options: If he loses again, Daniel Cormier can go to heavyweight or he can go to the commentary desk full-time. A second loss to Jon Jones would be a serious roadblock for him at light heavyweight, and I can’t see how it would be worth it for him to keep making that cut just to be an impediment to other potential contenders.

You could say the same about Jones at light heavyweight. You’d also have to admit that he’s the best light heavyweight in the history of the sport, so maybe knockout power isn’t a prerequisite for success.

I know we’re all waiting for Jones to make that jump, but there’s still some work for him to do at 205 pounds. If he can reclaim his title at UFC 214, maybe defend it in a rematch with Alexander Gustafsson after that, then beat up the winner of Jimi Manuwa vs. Volkan Oezdemir, just to put a stamp on the division (and prove he can hold down the title without sabotaging himself), then the time will be right for a jump.

Plus, where do you think Cormier will be by then? If he has to go to heavyweight after another loss to Jones, he may quickly rocket up the ranks. Who knows, he could even be champ by the time Jones moves up. And wouldn’t that just delight Jones, to get another chance to snatch something away from his most hated rival.

 

Whoa there. I’m going to need you to slow way down. Before we can even talk about something like that, your boy Kelvin Gastelum needs to do two things: 1) Beat Chris Weidman at UFC on FOX 25, and 2) Not do anything stupid like fail a drug test afterwards, even if it’s just for marijuana.

Isn’t it funny how, if you’d told someone in 2015 that Gastelum would be the favorite against Weidman, that would have seemed insane? Gastelum went 1-2 as a welterweight that year, while Weidman was the defending UFC middleweight champ right up until mid December.

The big question for me in this fight is where each guy’s head is at. Weidman didn’t lose at all until he suddenly couldn’t stop losing. Gastelum has the momentum, but also a history of finding ways to shoot himself in the foot. I’m not certain who has the edge there, but they’re both still a ways off from the man they call “Bobby Knuckles.”

Sure he can. As in, it’s not impossible. We’ve seen Demian Maia get some good wrestlers down, one way or another, even when they know it’s coming.

What I wonder is whether Maia can do it often enough, and to meaningful effect, or whether he’ll have to keep trying over and over again for five rounds, giving Tyron Woodley one too many practice swings at his skull.

We’re never going to completely stop it as long as MMA uses open-fingered gloves. The best we can hope for is that referees get better at spotting it when it happens and taking action to penalize the offenders enough that it’s worth being careful about.

The rule change is a start, since it gives referees more authority to crack down on fighters who let their fingers hang out in that danger zone in front of their opponents’ eyes. But referees are still reluctant to deduct points in MMA, which is somewhat understandable. In a three-round fight, one point deduction can change everything. Then again, as we saw in Sunday’s main event, the same is true of getting poked in the eye.

I don’t think it’s that simple. I watched the “HBO Real Sports” episode that detailed Chechen leader Ramzan Kadryrov’s use of MMA to help him consolidate power for his brutal regime. It was even more disturbing than I was expecting it to be, especially after Kadyrov explicitly condoned the murder of gay men and ended with a threat of nuclear Armageddon.

Clearly, that’s a place where sports and politics are intersecting, like it or not. The fighters who have taken money in exchange for allowing themselves to be used as public relations pawns – a list that includes Weidman, Fabricio Werdum, and Frank Mir, among others – should explain why they felt comfortable cozying up to someone like Kadyrov.

But when people complain about political views mixing with sports coverage, I think it usually means one of two things. The first possibility is that they view sports as an escape, some entertaining break from the real world, and they’d rather not have that bubble burst for them. That’s naive and a little selfish, since sports are made up of people and people are invariably affected by politics, but I almost see their point.

The other possibility is that, as my colleague Dave Doyle put it on Twitter recently, what these people really object to is hearing political views that they don’t share.

Fighters have convinced everyone, from judges to fans to coaches to each other, that a takedown in the final minute of a remotely close round is the deciding factor. It’s this weird kind of strategy that reinforces itself the more it’s used. We see a somewhat even round. We see someone shoot for a takedown in the waning seconds, when we all know that there’s not time enough to do much with it, and we tell ourselves that the success or failure of that attempt is what will swing the round.

And so it does. We’ve all accepted that, somewhat unconsciously, as the way the scoring works. If judges would stop rewarding that strategy so consistently, I suspect fighters would stop relying on it. I’m just not sure how you get that snowball rolling downhill.

For the record, MMAjunkie is referring to these as “Dana White’s Contender Series,” with the number of each event attached at the end. Still a mouthful, but an improvement. (Plus, how are you going to stick “Tuesday night” in the name when the thing starts in the late afternoon, local time?)

It probably won’t come as a shock to you that I would love to see this replace “The Ultimate Fighter.” We get more weekly action without the stale reality show drama, and it’s all happening live rather than as part of a pre-taped and carefully edited narrative. It also fills a niche in the MMA world, since it gives us a weekly fight show that doesn’t require the time commitment of a full-time job.

Not every MMA event needs to be a 13-course meal that takes six hours of your life. Dana White’s Contender Series is a bite-sized snack, and I’m into that.

Those two examples you mentioned are such wildly different circumstances that it’s hard to even compare them, but the root question here is worth considering.

For a good long while, the UFC didn’t have much meaningful competition in the free agent market. That’s only recently begun to change as Bellator, under CEO Scott Coker’s leadership, has gotten serious about bidding for name fighters like Gegard Mousasi. It can’t match the prestige of the UFC brand, but it can offer more freedom and flexibility, which makes things interesting for fighters who have chafed under the rigid structure of the current UFC.

Conor McGregor’s situation is a whole other ballgame, and yet some of the same issues still apply. Odds are he’ll make more than $100 million for his fight with Floyd Mayweather (though the UFC will reportedly pocket around $40 million just for greenlighting the thing). He’ll also get to sign his own lucrative sponsor deals. Once that’s all over, the UFC hopes to get him back in its cage before the year is out.

But asking McGregor to go back to being, as Mayweather likes to put it, “a $3 million fighter” making $40,000 in outfitting pay could be a tough sell. It’s a step backwards, both in pay and personal autonomy.

McGregor’s not the only person who will see that, either. Long term, these limitations have the power to hurt the sport, simply because they hurt athlete recruitment. It’s like we always say about the lack of quality heavyweights and light heavyweights in MMA. If you’re a big guy who’s also good at contact sports, you probably have options that will pay and treat you better than this sport will. It didn’t get this way on accident, either.

Ben Fowlkes is MMAjunkie and USA TODAY’s MMA columnist. Follow him on Twitter at @BenFowlkesMMA. Twitter Mailbag appears every Thursday on MMAjunkie.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC 213 medical suspensions: No surprise, but Robert Whittaker facing 6-month term after title win

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Filed under: News, UFC

The visible knee injury that accompanied Robert Whittaker’s UFC interim title win could keep him on the bench for six months.

Whittaker (19-4 MMA, 10-2 UFC) needs doctor clearance after Yoel Romero(12-2 MMA, 8-1 UFC) tweaked his left knee with a side kick early in last Saturday’s UFC 213 headliner.

The Nevada State Athletic Commission today released medical suspensions for the event, which took place at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. Main card fights aired live on pay-per-view following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass.

Romero, who suffered his first UFC loss, also needs doctor clearance for cuts on his left eyebrow and right scalp.

A total of 16 fighters were suspended by the NSAC for a variety of injuries. Four were given potential six-month terms unless cleared by a doctor.

The full list of medical suspensions for UFC 213 includes:

  • Robert Whittaker: needs MRI of left knee, if positive for injury needs orthopedic clearance or suspended until Jan. 4, 2018; minimum suspension until Aug. 8 with no contact until July 30
  • Yoel Romero: needs left eyebrow and right scalp lacerations cleared by doctor or suspended until Aug. 23 with no contact until Aug. 8
  • Fabricio Werdum: suspended until Aug. 23 with no contact until Aug. 8
  • Curtis Blaydes: needs right tibia/fibula and left chest rib X-rayed, if positive for injury needs doctor clearance or suspended until Jan. 4, 2018; minimum suspension until Aug. 8 with no contact until July 30
  • Daniel Omielanczuk: suspended until Aug. 8 with no contact until July 30
  • Anthony Pettis: needs right hand X-ray, if positive for injury needs orthopedic clearance or suspended until Jan. 4, 2018; minimum suspension until Aug. 23 with no contact until Aug. 8
  • Jim Miller: suspended until Aug. 23 with no contact until Aug. 8
  • Aleksei Oleinik: suspended until Aug. 8 with no contact until July 30
  • Travis Browne: needs left foot X-ray, if positive for injury needs orthopedic clearance or suspended until Jan. 4, 2018; minimum suspension until Aug. 23 with no contact until Aug. 8
  • Brian Camozzi: suspended until Aug. 23 with no contact until Aug. 8
  • Thiago Santos: needs right eye laceration cleared by doctor or suspended until Aug. 23 with no contact until Aug. 8
  • Gerald Meerschaert: suspended until Aug. 8 with no contact until July 30
  • Belal Muhammad: suspended until Aug. 8 with no contact until July 30
  • Jordan Mein: needs left eye laceration cleared by doctor or suspended until Aug. 23 with no contact until Aug. 8
  • Douglas Silva de Andrade: suspended until Aug. 8 with no contact until July 30
  • James Bochnovic: suspended until Sept. 7 with no contact until Aug. 23

For complete coverage of UFC 213, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC 213 'Fight Motion': Whole lotta ear-wigglin' goin' on

Filed under: News, UFC, Videos

Saturday’s UFC 213 card was fairly light on knockouts, but as we see in the latest “Fight Motion” video, plenty of big blows landed.

The super-slow-motion highlights captured the action from the pay-per-view event, which took place at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.

Check out the highlights, which saw more than a few ear wiggles, above.

The highlights include Robert Whittaker’s (19-4 MMA, 10-2 UFC) unanimous-decision victory over Yoel Romero (12-2 MMA, 8-1 UFC) for the interim middleweight belt, as well as Alistair Overeem’s (43-15 MMA, 8-4 UFC) narrow majority-decision win over former heavyweight champion Fabricio Werdum (21-7-1 MMA, 9-4 UFC).

We also get a good look at the big body punch that set up Chad Laprise’s (12-2 MMA, 5-2 UFC) third-round TKO victory over welterweight Brian Camozzi (7-4 MMA, 0-2 UFC)

For more on UFC 213, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Filed under: News, UFC, Videos
Source: MMA Junkie

Sean Shelby's shoes: What's next for Yoel Romero and UFC 213's other losing fighters?

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Filed under: Featured, Featured Videos, News, UFC, Videos

UFC 213 took place Saturday at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, with a five-fight main card on pay-pay-per-view.

Yoel Romero (12-2 MMA, 8-1 UFC) fell short of the interim UFC middleweight title in the headliner when he suffered a unanimous-decision loss to Robert Whittaker (19-4 MMA, 10-2 UFC) to experience the first blemish on his previously unbeaten UFC career.

Some other fighters suffered notable losses, as well, with Fabricio Werdum (21-7-1 MMA, 9-4 UFC), Daniel Omielanczuk (19-8-1 MMA, 4-5 UFC) and Jim Miller (28-10 MMA, 17-9 UFC) falling short on the scorecards, while Douglas Silva de Andrade (24-2 MMA, 2-2 UFC) was stopped inside the distance.

After every event, fans wonder whom the losing fighters will be matched up with next. And with another night of UFC action in the rearview mirror, it’s time to look forward, put on a pair of Sean Shelby and Mick Maynard’s shoes, and play UFC matchmaker for UFC 213’s key losing fighters.

* * * *

Jim Miller

Should fight: Abel Trujillo
Why they should fight: Although Miller fell short against a former UFC champion in Anthony Pettis, there’s no taking away from his status as one of the most decorated names in UFC history who should keep a place on the roster as long as he sees fit.

Miller tied the record for most appearances in UFC history in the unanimous-decision loss to Pettis. He was once considered a contender, but at this point in his career his position on the roster is fairly clear, and he should be allowed that position until he either completely falls off the map or retires.

Miller has almost exclusively lost to top tier opponents. A step back is necessary if he wants to keep his career in a safe position, and Trujillo (15-7 MMA, 6-3 UFC) is just that. Although Trujillo is not an easy fight, he’s winnable for Miller and also a name which would not be viewed as a write-off.

Daniel Omielanczuk

Should fight: Winner of James Mulheron vs. Justin Willis at UFC Fight Night 113
Why they should fight: Omielanczuk was pegged as the biggest betting underdog on the card and unfortunately that rang true when he fell short against Curtis Blaydes in a heavyweight fight.

Omielanczuk suffered a unanimous-decision loss to fall under .500 over the course of his nine-fight UFC career. He’ll need to go back to drawing board, but his hope of keeping a UFC roster spot is not yet lost.

A win for Omielanczuk would have potentially pushed him into top 15 matchups in the heavyweight division. The loss keeps him paired against fighters of a similar stature, though, and the winner of the July 15 fight between Mulheron (11-1 MMA, 0-0 UFC) and Willis (4-1 MMA, 0-0 UFC) at UFC Fight Night 113 would be right in his wheelhouse.

Fabricio Werdum

Should fight: Loser of Junior Dos Santos vs. Francis Ngannou at UFC 215
Why they should fight: Werdum’s chance to break back into heavyweight title contention was harshly derailed with a majority-decision loss in his trilogy fight with Alistair Overeem.

With his 40th birthday rapidly approaching, it’s difficult to gauge whether the Brazilian will be eager to make another run in the division. The upside is that he’s a former champion, has a name and could be just a few wins and a couple good breaks from becoming a pertinent contender again.

Werdum needs to beat a key name, though, and the loser of September’s UFC 215 bout between Dos Santos (18-5 MMA, 12-4 UFC) and Ngannou (10-1 MMA, 5-0 UFC) would be a solid target.

Werdum has history with Dos Santos after he suffered a stunning knockout loss to the then-UFC newcomer in 2008. The rematch has been long in the making and frankly should have already been done. If Ngannou comes up short, however, a showdown with Werdum would be another big chance after the Frenchman’s first octagon defeat.

Yoel Romero

Should fight: Luke Rockhold
Why they should fight: Watch the video above to see why Romero should fight Rockhold (15-3 MMA, 5-2 UFC) next.

For complete coverage of UFC 213, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC 213 video highlights: Alistair Overeerm vs. Fabricio Werdum

Filed under: Featured Videos, News, UFC, Videos

Alistair Overeem had to hold on for dear life at the end, but his reward for making it the distance was victory even after a shaky final round against Fabricio Werdum.

After controlling most of the first two rounds, Overeem (43-15 MMA, 8-4 UFC) was fortunate to survive after a late surge from Werdum (21-7-1 MMA, 9-4 UFC), hanging on to win a majority decision victory with scores of 28-28, 29-28, and 29-28.

The heavyweight bout was part of the main card of today’s UFC 213 event at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. It aired on pay-per-view following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass.

Check out the highlights above.

Also see:

For complete coverage UFC 213, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Robbery? Twitter reacts to Alistair Overeem's trilogy win over Fabricio Werdum at UFC 213

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More than 11 years after their first meeting, heavyweight legends Alistair Overeem and Fabricio Werdum concluded the trilogy of fights between them on Saturday at UFC 213.

After having split results over their first two meetings, Overeem (43-15 MMA, 8-4 UFC) won the best-of-three with a majority decision victory over Werdum (21-7-1 MMA, 9-4 UFC) in the pay-per-view main card bout at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. Prelims aired on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass.

Check below for the top Twitter reactions to Overeem’s victory over Werdum at UFC 213.

* * * *

For complete coverage of UFC 213, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC 213 results: Alistair Overeem wins trilogy rematch with Fabricio Werdum by majority decision

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Alistair Overeem had to hold on for dear life at the end, but his reward for making it the distance was victory even after a shaky final round against Fabricio Werdum.

After controlling most of the first two rounds, Overeem (43-15 MMA, 8-4 UFC) was fortunate to survive after a late surge from Werdum (21-7-1 MMA, 9-4 UFC), hanging on to win a majority decision victory with scores of 28-28, 29-28, and 29-28.

The heavyweight bout was part of the main card of today’s UFC 213 event at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. It aired on pay-per-view following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass.

For two fighters who know each other well, Overeem and Werdum certainly took a long time feeling one another out to start their rubber match. That may have been more to Overeem’s advantage, as he hung back and looked to counter a somewhat hesitant Werdum, which in turn led to Overeem scoring the crisper and more significant blows early on.

After getting stung by Overeem in the second frame, Werdum resorted to similar tactics as those he used in their second meeting, twice flopping to guard in an effort to engage Overeem in a grappling battle. Overeem obliged him, but briefly, and Werdum was never able to capitalize on having Overeem in his guard.

In the final round, however, Werdum’s offense on the feet finally began to bear fruit. After hurting Overeem with punches and knees, he dropped him momentarily and then pursued a wobbly Overeem across the cage, looking for the finish. But rather than pour on the punishment with strikes while standing, Werdum opted to take Overeem down midway through the round.

The takedown was successful, but Werdum’s offense soon stalled as Overeem held on and clung to Werdum in his guard as his last line of defense. Werdum was content to while away the final seconds with thumping body strikes, but it wasn’t enough to make his case to the judges.

Once the final horn sounded, two judges had the fight in favor of Overeem while one scored it a draw, netting Overeem the win via majority decision.

“I feel great with the win tonight,” Overeem said. “I felt I was clearly the dominant fighter in the first two rounds. Round 3 was a little tough, but I knew I had controlled the fight before then. Werdum is tough, but I was the better man tonight. With that win, my next move is clear: I am ready for Stipe (Miocic) and I will take the championship.”

Overeem has now won two in a row in the UFC. Werdum has lost two of his last three.

Up-to-the-minute UFC 213 results include:

For complete coverage UFC 213, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

(MMAjunkie’s John Morgan and Steven Marroco contributed to this report on site in Las Vegas.)

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Source: MMA Junkie