UFC Fight Night 119 medical suspensions: Headliner Lyoto Machida out 60 days

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Former UFC light heavyweight champion Lyoto Machida must spend two months on the bench after a knockout loss to Derek Brunson at UFC Fight Night 119.

That’s according to medical suspensions today obtained by MMAjunkie from the Brazilian Athletic Commission of MMA (CABMMA), which regulated the event this past Saturday at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo. The event aired on FS1 following prelims on FS2 and UFC Fight Pass.

Machida’s (22-8 MMA, 14-8 UFC) first-round knockout loss to Brunson (18-5 MMA, 9-3 UFC) left him at 1-4 in his past five outings.

Another serious suspension from the event was issued to bantamweight Marlon Vera, who could potentially be out six months if an X-ray validates an injury to his left foot. Vera (10-4-1 MMA, 4-3 UFC) suffered a unanimous-decision loss to slugger John Lineker (30-8 MMA, 11-3 UFC) on the FS1-televised main card.

All fighters from the card received a minimum suspension of 14 days with seven days of no contact during training. With the exception of Vera, CABMMA did not provide details on the nature of the fighters’ suspensions.

The full list of UFC Fight Night 119 medical suspensions, aside from the customary 14-day terms, include:

  • Lyoto Machida: suspended 60 days with 45 days no contact
  • Colby Covington: suspended 30 days with 21 days no contact
  • Demian Maia: suspended 45 days with 30 days no contact
  • Jack Hermansson: suspended 45 days with 30 days no contact
  • Marlon Vera: suspended 180 days or until left foot is cleared early by X-ray; regardless, suspended 30 days with 21 days no contact
  • Niko Price: suspended 45 days with 30 days no contact
  • Jared Gordon: suspended 45 days with 30 days no contact
  • Hacran Dias: suspended 45 days with 30 days no contact
  • Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos: suspended 45 days with 30 days no contact
  • Max Griffin: suspended 45 days with 30 days no contact
  • Christian Colombo: suspended 30 days with 21 days no contact

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Tyron Woodley isn't amused by Colby Covington's schtick, but is he missing a golden opportunity?

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Tyron Woodley is not amused.

While the UFC was trying to get a headstart on some Colby Covington hype this weekend, the UFC welterweight champion fired back in apparent disgust.

It seems Covington’s unanimous-decision win over Demian Maia at UFC Fight Night 119 and all the questionable vitriol that went with it was no laughing matter to Woodley, even if it was a joke.

In one sense, you can see where he’s coming from. Woodley’s the champion of the division with two consecutive title defenses to his credit, while Covington is out here doing an off-brand Chael Sonnen routine to rile up the Sao Paolo crowd and force his name into the headlines.

At the very least, it’s obnoxious. It’s the dumbest line between two points, all the more maddening because it’s so obvious yet effective.

Woodley wasn’t having it, which is unfortunate, because in a lot of ways he could really use a guy like Covington.

Consider the current plight of the UFC welterweight champion. In the 15 months since taking the title via first-round knockout from longtime priest of violence Robbie Lawler, Woodley has put the belt up for grabs three times.

The first and most memorable bout was the majority draw against Stephen Thompson at UFC 205. The other two – a rematch with Thompson at UFC 209 and, most recently, a clash with Maia at UFC 214 – are now officially classified as sleep aids by the FDA.

Point is, nobody in the UFC offices hears the cash register noise when the phrase “Tyron Woodley pay-per-view” gets tossed around in meetings. Even among the hardest of hardcore fans, you don’t get the sense anyone is waking up in the morning asking themselves when their wish for another Woodley fight will finally be granted.

Then along comes a guy like Covington, talking a big game while following a predictable but proven blueprint. He has his sights set on Woodley, and he has some cringe-inducing trash talk he hopes will help him get there. The end result is that he’s now hated by two types of people: the ones who bought the schtick and the ones who didn’t. Both want to see him get pummeled, albeit for slightly different reasons.

Then there’s Woodley, who seems pretty capable of doing the pummeling. The Covington who went lunging after Maia on Saturday night would likely be in for a quick night against a heavy-hitting wrestler like Woodley. You’re not going to smother the champ against the fence. You’re not going to chase after him, peppering him with off-balance punches, either.

Woodley catches a lot of grief for being overly, uh, let’s say patient, at times, but he’s still an exciting fighter when he wants to be – or when he’s forced to be.

So why does he seem revolted even by the thought of facing someone like Covington? Judging by his remarks on social media during and after the fight, seems like Woodley regards the whole thing as unserious, undignified, maybe even a little pathetic. It’s not too hard to see his point.

All these exciting welterweights, from Lawler to Rafael dos Anjos to upstarts like Mike Perry, Darren Till, Kamaru Usman, and Santiago Ponzinibbio, and here we are talking about the guy who acts like he’s auditioning for the role of ‘80s movie wrestling team bully? It’s got to be a little disheartening for the champ.

Then again, you also get the sense that maybe Woodley is so focused on how things ought to be that he doesn’t see how they are. Covington’s routine? It’s succeeded in getting him noticed. It’s succeeded even in getting him physically threatened by members of his own team, which is no small feat.

For a fighter in a crowded welterweight field, indifference is the enemy. And even if some people are rolling their eyes at Covington’s gimmick, those same people would probably delight at seeing him get punched in the mouth.

But for someone like Woodley, who struggled for years to get to the top of the heap, isn’t that all just a little too sad? He’s got the gold belt that says he’s the best in the world, and now what we want him to do is defend it against the guy who talks the loudest? Is that really where we want this sport to go? Worse yet, is it where we already are?

Then again, Woodley’s tried it his way, focusing on the fights and mostly eschewing the trash talk. He wants to see contenders prove themselves, wants opponents to “respectfully” earn a title shot. It’s like he wants some version of the sport that doesn’t exist anymore and maybe never really did.

If Woodley wants to be a hero, he could do a lot worse than to accept a ready-made villain. The fact that it seems so distasteful to him is understandable. It’s just hard not to wish he had a better idea to offer instead, and preferably one that’s at least a little bit fun.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

ATT co-founder Ricardo Liborio condemns Colby Covington, announces departure from team

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Add now-former ATT head coach Ricardo Liborio to the list of people who aren’t happy with Colby Covington’s post-fight antics at UFC Fight Night 119 in Sao Paulo.

Brazil’s Liborio today took to social media to reprimand Covington’s (13-1 MMA, 8-1 UFC) insults to the country and its residents, whom the UFC welterweight called “filthy animals” after a unanimous-decision win over Demian Maia (25-8 MMA, 19-8 UFC) on Saturday. In the same statement, Liborio also announced his departure from American Top Team, which he co-founded in 2001.

“I absolutely do not condone any behavior that instigates hate, prejudice, or bullying of any kind,” Liborio said of Covington’s behavior. “It upsets me to see the sport taking this direction of blatant disrespect. It’s unsportsmanlike, but it also fosters and promotes a culture of cruelty towards others.”

Although Covington trains at ATT, Liborio never tied his departure from the Florida-based team to the welterweight’s actions. Rather, the former jiu-jitsu world champion said the actual reasons will be revealed in due time. (via Instagram).

Instagram Photo

Covington’s words at UFC Fight Night 119’s FS1-televised co-headliner has so far resulted in loud booing, object-throwing and criticism from his peers. But, according to UFC official David Shaw, he may also receive additional punishment should a committee decide he violated the UFC’s code of conduct.

In any case, it doesn’t really seem like we can expect repentance from Covington, who so far has only apologized to the filthy animals he compared Brazil’s population to.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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UFC Fight Night 119 post-event facts: Is this the end of Lyoto Machida?

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Derek Brunson pulled off yet another remarkable first-round knockout on Saturday when in the UFC Fight Night 119 headliner he became the fastest to ever defeat former UFC champion Lyoto Machida.

Brunson (18-5 MMA, 9-3 UFC) used his dangerous left hand to set up a quick finish of Machida (22-8 MMA, 14-8 UFC) in the FS1-televised middleweight headliner at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo. Prelims aired on FS2 and UFC Fight Pass.

As a result, “The One” is becoming a fixture in the UFC 185-pound record books.

The UFC’s sixth stop in Sao Paulo saw Brazilian fighters win nine of 12 bouts. For more on the numbers behind the card, check below for 55 post-event facts about UFC Fight Night 119.

* * * *

General

Brazilian fighters fell to 3-7 main event fights on home soil dating back to December 2014.

The UFC-Reebok Athlete Outfitting payout for the event totaled $170,000.

Debuting fighters went 0-1 at the event.

Brunson, Pedro Munhoz, Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos and Max Griffin earned $50,000 UFC Fight Night 119 fight-night bonuses.

UFC Fight Night 119 drew an announced attendance of 10,265. No live gate was disclosed for the event.

Betting favorites went 8-3 on the card. One fight had even odds.

Total fight time for the 12-bout card was 1:57:18.

Main card

Brunson’s nine UFC victories since 2012 in middleweight competition are tied with Brad Tavares for most in the division.

Brunson has earned seven of his nine UFC victories by stoppage.

Brunson’s seven UFC stoppage victories since 2012 in middleweight competition are tied for most in the division.

Brunson’s seven first-round stoppage victories in UFC middleweight competition are most in divisional history.

Machida fell to 5-7 in UFC main event fights.

Machida’s three-fight losing skid is the longest of his career. He hasn’t earned a victory since December 2014.

Machida fell to 3-4 since he dropped to the UFC middleweight division in October 2013.

Machida has suffered three of his four UFC middleweight losses by stoppage.

Colby Covington’s (13-1 MMA, 8-1 UFC) five-fight UFC winning streak in welterweight competition is the second longest active streak in the division behind Kamaru Usman (six).

Covington attempted no takedowns in a fight for the first time in his UFC career. He landed 41 takedowns combined in his previous eight UFC appearances.

Demian Maia (25-8 MMA, 19-8 UFC) fell to 10-4 since he dropped to the UFC welterweight division in July 2012.

Maia is a combined 0-for-35 on takedown attempts over his past two UFC appearances.

Maia has suffered seven of his eight UFC losses by decision.

Pedro Munhoz and Rob Font

Munhoz’s (15-2 MMA, 5-2 UFC) four-fight UFC winning streak in bantamweight competition is the third longest active streak in the division behind champ Cody Garbrandt (five) and Jimmie Rivera (five).

Munhoz has earned four of his five UFC victories by stoppage.

Munhoz’s three submission victories in UFC bantamweight competition are tied for second most in divisional history behind Urijah Faber (six).

Rob Font (14-3 MMA, 4-2 UFC) suffered the first submission loss of his career.

Francisco Trinaldo’s (22-5 MMA, 12-4 UFC) 11 victories since 2011 in UFC lightweight competition are tied with Donald Cerrone for most in the division.

Trinaldo has earned seven of his past nine victories by decision.

Jim Miller (28-11 MMA, 17-10 UFC) three-fight losing skid is the longest of his career. He hasn’t earned a victory since November 2016.

Miller fell to 4-7 in his past 11 UFC appearances.

Miller’s total fight time of 4:57:53 in UFC lightweight competition is most in divisional history.

Miller has suffered eight of his 11 career losses by decision.

Thiago “Marreta” Santos (16-5 MMA, 8-4 UFC) has earned seven of his eight UFC victories by knockout.

Santos’ seven knockout victories in UFC middleweight fights are tied with champ Michael Bisping and Chris Leben for second most in divisional history behind Anderson Silva (eight).

Thiago “Marreta” Santos

Santos’ seven knockouts since 2014 in UFC competition are tied for second most in the company behind Derrick Lewis (eight).

Jack Hermansson (16-4 MMA, 3-2 UFC) suffered the first knockout loss of his career.

John Lineker (30-8 MMA, 11-3 UFC) improved to 5-1 since he moved up to the UFC bantamweight division in September 2015.

Marlon Vera (10-4-1 MMA, 4-3 UFC) has suffered all four of his career losses by decision.

Preliminary card

Vicente Luque (12-6-1 MMA, 5-2 UFC) has earned 11 of his 12 career victories by stoppage. That includes all five of his UFC wins.

Luque’s five stoppage victories since 2015 in UFC competition are tied for second most in the company behind Lewis (six).

Luque’s two D’arce choke victories in UFC competition are tied with Dustin Poirier for second most in company history behind Tony Ferguson (three).

Niko Price (10-1 MMA, 2-1 UFC) had his 11-fight unbeaten streak snapped for the first defeat of his career.

Antonio Carlos Junior (9-2 MMA, 6-2 UFC) improved to 5-1 (with one no-contest) since he dropped to the UFC middleweight division in June 2015.

Carlos Junior’s four-fight UFC winning streak in middleweight competition is the third longest active streak in the division behind Robert Whittaker (seven) and Bisping (five).

Carlos Junior has earned all of his career stoppage victories by submission.

Jack Marshman (22-7 MMA, 2-2 UFC) suffered the first submission loss of his career.

Hacran Dias’ (23-6-1 MMA, 3-5 UFC) three-fight losing skid is the longest of his career. He hasn’t earned a victory since June 2015.

Dias has suffered all six of his career losses by decision.

Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos

Zaleski dos Santos’ (18-5 MMA, 4-1 UFC) four-fight UFC winning streak in welterweight competition is tied for the third longest active streak in the division behind Kamaru Usman (six) and Covington (five).

Dos Santos has earned three of his four UFC victories by decision.

Griffin (13-4 MMA, 1-2 UFC) has suffered three of his four career losses by decision.

Deiveson Figueiredo (13-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) earned just the second decision victory of his career and first since May 1, 2014 – a span of 1,276 days (more than three years) and nine fights.

Jarred Brooks (13-1 MMA, 1-1 UFC) had his 13-fight winning streak snapped for the first defeat of his career.

Marcelo Golm (5-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC) has earned all of his career victories by stoppage.

Golm earned the first submission victory of his career.

Christian Colombo (8-3-1 MMA, 0-2-1 UFC) has suffered all three of his career losses by submission.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

FightMetric research analyst and live statistics producer Michael Carroll contributed to this story. Follow him on Twitter @MJCflipdascript.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Colby Covington issues formal apology (but not really) to 'any filthy animal I offended'

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If you haven’t noticed by now, Colby Covington isn’t about to bow to the reaction of the UFC brass, media or any fans to take back his negative comments about Brazilians following his victory over Demian Maia on Saturday at UFC Fight Night 119.

Following Covington’s (13-1 MMA, 8-1 UFC) largely dominant unanimous decision win over Maia (25-8 MMA, 19-8 UFC) in the FS1-televised welterweight bout at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo, “Chaos” lived up to his nickname by calling Brazilians “filthy animals” and labeling the country “a dump.”

The response to Covington’s antics was fierce. He was showered with hateful comments and trash as he exited the octagon, and was held out of the UFC Fight Night 119 post-fight news conference in part because a UFC official voiced a displeasure in his actions.

Although there were hints disciplinary action could be coming, Covington told MMAjunkie he refused to walk back anything he said. Today, he issued a formal apology on social media, but it was far from the bland, cookie-cutter type of statement that might be expected in such a situation (via Twitter):

Covington, 29, is embracing his position as a hated character in MMA. He successfully got almost all of Brazil to call for his head, and also successfully agitated UFC welterweight champion Tyron Woodley (18-3-1 MMA, 8-2-1 UFC) with some bold claims on how he would dethrone the current divisional kingpin.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Colby Covington's gimmick is a familiar one, but can you deny that it works?

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Shortly after dodging flying refuse on his way out of Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo on Saturday night, Colby Covington paused to reflect on the experience.

“I enjoyed it,” Covington (13-1 MMA, 8-1 UFC) said. “I had a great time out there. It was a lot of fun.”

By “it,” he meant not only the thrashing of recent welterweight title challenger Demian Maia (25-8 MMA, 19-8 UFC) in the co-main event of UFC Fight Night 119, but also everything that came after, including when he told about 10,000 Brazilians that they were “filthy animals” and their nation was a “dump.”

As if on cue, the locals began looking around for trash to dispose of – you know, clean the place up a little bit – and there was Covington, on his way backstage anyway, so apparently they all had the same idea to give their unwanted beer receptacles to him as he passed by surrounded by security staff.

If you’re running the kind of game Covington is, that kind of anger is a good thing. It’s a sign that your gimmick is working. And if you’re going to work the obnoxious, disdainful foreigner gimmick, there’s no better place to do it than Brazil, where the fans chant about your impending death just as a pre-fight tradition.

This is not new. Covington is borrowing from Chael Sonnen the same gimmick that Sonnen borrowed from the pro-wrestling canon. Roll into a new city, insult the local heroes and/or sports teams, disparage the infrastructure, maybe imply that the current populace is the result of some unfortunate mutation, then close your eyes and let the boos wash over you. Congratulations, you’re a villain now.

It’s not hard to do. You can tell because Covington isn’t even doing a great job of it – his version is a knock-off of a knock-off – but still it works. It’s easier to make people hate you than it is to make them love you, and in the end it may be a more reliable revenue stream.

The good guy has a lot of ways to fall from grace. All the bad guy has to do is stay unrepentantly hateable while making sure not to get caught perpetrating any acts of honesty or kindness.

But it comes at a price, this type of notoriety. If you’re a pro wrestler, sure, you can call the locals sweathogs and whip them into a fine froth, and it just means you’re doing your job. You don’t even have to do it under your real name, which simplifies the process when you want to take off the mask once you get home.

Pro fighters don’t get that luxury. Here, calling a room full of Brazilians a bunch of ugly names earns you not only some quick heat, but also a “review” from the UFC. If you train with a bunch of Brazilians, as Covington does, it can also make things awkward back in the gym, especially when the giant Brazilian dude decides he wants to teach you some respect.

Real life people get mad at the real life you, and it doesn’t always placate them to explain that it was all a means to an end.

At the same time, how can anyone say it isn’t working? On a mediocre UFC Fight Night card, Covington made himself the story. Even while admitting that his whole goal was to hype a fight (pro tip: that’s the subtext, bro – you’re not supposed to say it out loud), he stole headlines and injected himself into the welterweight title picture, all with a unanimous-decision win that was by no means spectacular.

Just look around. Derek Brunson knocked a former champion out cold, a feat for which he will receive a few fleeting attaboys. Covington chipped steadily away at a longtime contender and won the fight on the scorecards, but he forced fans to feel some way about him while also putting his name in the champion’s mouth.

For a paint-by-numbers approach to self-hype that is as obvious as it is ancient, those are some pretty good results.

Those are the benefits of playing the villain, which is easy enough. Now comes the hard part. Now Covington has to go home and live as the villain. And once you start down that path, the only way out is through.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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UFC Fight Night 119 Athlete Outfitting pay: Program total passes $15 million mark

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SAO PAULO – Fighters from Saturday’s UFC Fight Night 119 event took home UFC Athlete Outfitting pay, a program that launched after the UFC’s deal with Reebok, totaling $170,000.

UFC Fight Night 119 took place at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo. The card aired on FS1 following prelims on FS2 and UFC Fight Pass.

Leading the way were a number of individuals. Longtime octagon veterans Lyoto Machida (22-8 MMA, 14-8 UFC), Demian Maia (25-8 MMA, 19-8 UFC) and Jim Miller (28-11 MMA, 17-10 UFC) all earned maximum non-title-fight payouts of $20,000.

The full UFC Fight Night 119 UFC Athlete Outfitting payouts included:

Derek Brunson: $15,000
def. Lyoto Machida: $20,000

Colby Covington: $5,000
def. Demian Maia: $20,000

Pedro Munhoz: $5,000
def. Rob Font: $5,000

Francisco Trinaldo: $15,000
def. Jim Miller: $20,000

Thiago “Marreta” Santos: $10,000
def. Jack Hermansson: $2,500

John Lineker: $10,000
def. Marlon Vera: $5,000

Vicente Luque: $5,000
def. Niko Price: $2,500

Antonio Carlos Junior: $5,000
def. Jack Marshman: $2,500

Jared Gordon: $2,500
def. Hacran Dias: $5,000

Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos: $2,500
def. Max Griffin: $2,500

Deiveson Figueiredo: $2,500
def. Jarred Brooks: $2,500

Marcelo Golm: $2,500
def. Christian Colombo: $2,500

Under the UFC Athlete Outfitting program’s payout tiers, which appropriate the money generated by Reebok’s multi-year sponsorship with the UFC, fighters are paid based on their total number of UFC bouts, as well as Zuffa-era WEC fights (January 2007 and later) and Zuffa-era Strikeforce bouts (April 2011 and later). Fighters with 1-5 bouts receive $2,500 per appearance; 6-10 bouts get $5,000; 11-15 bouts earn $10,000; 16-20 bouts pocket $15,000; and 21 bouts and more get $20,000. Additionally, champions earn $40,000 while title challengers get $30,000.

In addition to experience-based pay, UFC fighters will receive in perpetuity royalty payments amounting to 20-30 percent of any UFC merchandise sold that bears their likeness, according to officials.

Full 2017 UFC-Reebok sponsorship payouts:

Year-to-date total: $4,762,500
2016 total: $7,138,000
2015 total: $3,185,000
Program-to-date total: $15,085,500

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Fight Tracks: The walkout songs of UFC Fight Night 119 with a stark 'Dragon' invoking 'Game of Thrones'

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While it takes intense training, world-class skills and maybe even a bit of luck to register a UFC win, picking the right song to accompany you to the cage is a key talent, as well.

See what the fighters of Saturday’s UFC Fight Night 119 in Sao Paulo went with as their backing tracks.

* * * *

Derek Brunson def. Lyoto Machida via knockout (punches) – Round 1, 2:30

Derek Brunson: “HUMBLE” by Kendrick Lamar

Lyoto Machida: “Game of Thrones” theme by Ramin Djawadi

Colby Covington def. Demian Maia via unanimous decision (29-27, 30-27, 30-26)

Colby Covington: “Amazing” by Kanye West feat. Young Jeezy

Demian Maia: “Numb” by Linkin Park

Pedro Munhoz def. Rob Font via submission (guillotine choke) – Round 1, 4:03

Pedro Munhoz: “Ambitionz az a Ridah” by Tupac

Rob Font: “Welcome to Jamrock” by Damian Marley

Francisco Trinaldo def. Jim Miller via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-28, 29-28)

Francisco Trinaldo: “Can’t Be Touched” by Roy Jones Jr.

Jim Miller: “It’s a Long Way To the Top (If You Wanna Rock and Roll)” by AC/DC

Thiago “Marreta” Santos def. Jack Hermansson via TKO (punches) – Round 1, 4:59

Thiago “Marreta” Santos: “Marreta Da CCD Para O Mundo” by MC Isaac Saradhino

Jack Hermansson: “The Joker” by Damien feat. Terje Tylden

John Lineker def. Marlon Vera via unanimous decision (30-27, 29-28, 29-28)

John Lineker: “Chega De Religiao” by Ultima Geracao

Marlon Vera: “Entourage” by Nick Lewis feat. Brandon J. Walker
Vicente Luque def. Niko Price via submission (D’arce choke) – Round 2, 4:08

Vicente Luque: “Baby Baby” by Tropkillaz

Niko Price: “Coming Home” by Diddy Dirty Money feat. Skylar Grey

Antonio Carlos Junior def. Jack Marshman via submission (rear-naked choke) – Round 1

Antonio Carlos Junior: “Let’s Twist Again” by Chubby Checker

Jack Marshman: “Tick Tock” by Giggs

Jared Gordon Gordon def. Hacran Dias via unanimous decision (29-26, 29-27, 30-26)

Jared Gordon: “Flash” by Queen

Hacran Dias: “Last Breath” by Future

Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos def. Max Griffin via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-27, 29-28)

Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos: “The Final Countdown” by Europe

Max Griffin: “Sucker For Pain” by Lil’ Wayne, Wiz Khalifa & Imagine Dragons

Deiveson Figueiredo def. Jarred Brooks via split decision (27-30, 29-28, 29-28)

Deiveson Figueiredo: “Follow U (Xilent Remix)” by Yogi feat. Ayah Marar

Jarred Brooks: “Me de Amor” by Sango

Marcelo Golm def. Christian Colombo via submission (rear-naked choke) – Round 1, 2:08

Marcelo Golm: “Close My Eyes” by Tupac

Christian Colombo: “Godzilla” by Blue Oyster Cult

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Unapologetic Colby Covington explains why post-fight antics weren't 'that offensive'

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SAO PAULO – Colby Covington says the backlash to his post-fight comments following his victory over Demian Maia in Saturday’s UFC Fight Night 119 co-headliner are unjust.

After handing Maia (25-8 MMA, 19-8 UFC) a bloody unanimous-decision loss in the welterweight bout at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo, Covington (13-1 MMA, 8-1 UFC) called Brazilians “filthy animals” and labeled the country “a dump.” Covington had to be rushed out of the octagon by security, and he said the experience was certainly something unique.

“That was unlike anything I’ve ever been through in my life,” Covington told MMAjunkie following the event. “Beer bottles flying across my head. I got hit a couple times by a couple bottles, but the security did a good job. There was like 20 guys huddled over me making sure my head was low. (UFC exec) Reed Harris said he had to pull some guy out of the stands that hit me with a bottle. Man, it was chaos. And that’s what comes with my nickname. I enjoyed it. I had a great time out there. It was a lot of fun.”

Covington’s comments received a noticeable amount of backlash, with several of his teammates at American Top Team criticizing him in bold fashion. Covington claims he was held out of the UFC Fight Night 119 post-event news conference, and UFC exec Dave Shaw told the media that the company was unhappy with the fighter and would review the situation to see if Covington had violated the UFC code of conduct.

“Chaos” said he feels the amount of negative feedback from both the UFC, his fellow fighters and the public is unwarranted. Moreover, he refused to accept any blame or make excuses for his comments.

“I don’t walk back anything I said because I don’t think I said anything that offensive,” Covington said. “Look at the stuff they’re saying to me all week, the stuff in the walkout. They’re saying, ‘Oh, you’re a (expletive). You’re going to die. You’re a (expletive). You’re this.’ Homophobic slurs. All these different super-nasty remarks. Where’s the double standard at?

“They can say these things, but I say, ‘Oh, the place is a dump’ and ‘they’re filthy animals’ just as a game? This is a game to me. I’m just having fun with it. I’m just trying to promote and make it fun for the fans. How am I taking criticism from that? Look at what they’re saying to me. Stop having a double standard.”

Controversy aside, Covington left UFC Fight Night 119 with the biggest victory of his career. Besides a first round where he ate numerous clean punches and sustained a cut, Covington largely had his way with the former two-time UFC title challenger. Afterward, he called out current UFC welterweight champ Tyron Woodley (18-3-1 MMA, 8-2-1 UFC).

Covington pushed his current winning streak to five consecutive fights with the performance against Maia. He admitted he wasn’t thrilled by his showing, but the 29-year-old is extremely confident he could get the best of “The Chosen One” in a championship bout.

Why? Because Covington said he has a training history with Woodley that goes in his favor.

“We’ve trained together, and deep down inside, he can say whatever he wants, but he knows I broke him in the gym,” Covington said. “We were supposed to spar five rounds one day. Inside three rounds, he said, ‘I’m done for the day. I’m too tired. I’m too gassed out.’

“I know how to fight that guy. He got beat by Jake Shields in a striking fight. Come on, man. He got beat by Rory MacDonald. Look how Rory fought him. Nate Marquardt, look how the guys fought him. They pressure fight him; he breaks under pressure. I’m a 10-times better version of those guys, so I know it’s an easy matchup, and I’m looking to take my belt. I’m the king of this division, this is my division now.”

Although Covington’s trash talk, confidence and alleged history with Woodley make him an intriguing option to fight for the belt, the next title shot has already been assigned to the winner of December’s UFC on FOX 26 main event between ex-champs Robbie Lawler and Rafael dos Anjos. Covington dismissed both fighters as deserving and made it clear he won’t settle for anything less than a crack at the gold.

“I do believe that I earned a title fight,” Covington said. “Look at how bad I bloodied Demian Maia. I completely outclassed him. Tyron Woodley couldn’t do that to him in five rounds. Look at what I did in three rounds. Give me five rounds with Tyron Woodley and I’ll beat that ass-kissing champ. As far as ‘RDA’ and ‘Ruthless’ Lawler, I mean Lawler, he got knocked out in a minute (by Woodley). You’re going to do that fight again if he beats ‘RDA’? That doesn’t make sense. He’s passed his time.

“(Lawler) takes a year, a year-and-a-half off after he gets knocked out and then he beats (Donald) Cerrone, barely, in a split decision? You saw how Cerrone looked against (Darren) Till. Lawler doesn’t look that good and he’s at the end of his career and he’s already been knocked out in under a minute. It doesn’t make sense to do that fight again. And ‘RDA’? He’s beaten two guys on losing streaks. Neil Magny’s on a losing streak, Tarec Saffiedine was on like a four-fight losing streak. I don’t think there’s anybody more deserving in the world, and if you want someone to dethrone that champ, I’m the guy to beat Tyron Woodley.”

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Demian Maia says Colby Covington just promoting with antics

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SAO PAULO – Most of Sao Paulo might want to stuff Colby Covington into a locker, but veteran UFC middleweight Demian Maia doesn’t take his trash talk personally.

After all, Covington told him not to.

“Since the beginning of the week, he said he respected me a lot, and he was promoting the fight, and that was his way of promoting,” said Maia (25-8 MMA, 19-8 UFC) after a unanimous decision loss to Covington (13-1 MMA, 8-1 UFC) in the FS1-televised co-headliner of UFC Fight Night 119, which took place Saturday at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo, Brazil. “He told me I’m a legend, and he admires me and he only does that for promoting.”

Prior to the fight, Covington made no secret of his respect for Maia while also vowing to retire the two-time title challenger. Covington relished his role as a heel who doesn’t care about the reaction his words provoke in fans.

There was no mistaking that stance in Covington’s fiery post-fight interview. He called Brazilians “filthy animals” and called their country a dump while calling for a title shot.

Dozens of fans at Ibirapuera Gymnasium pelted Covington with cups and food as he walked backstage. He was flanked by a team of security guards.

The UFC subsequently pulled him from the event’s post-fight press conference, while UFC executive David Shaw said his conduct is “under review.”

The boos probably didn’t help matters, but Maia admitted he didn’t hear what Covington said during his post-fight interview.

“Obviously, it’s not my style,” Maia said. “I don’t like that style. But I don’t judge him. I think he’s free to do whatever he wants to promote. What matters is he was respectful. He was correct to come and talk to me, so there’s no problem.”

Maia, though, indicated Covington might want to think about his approach to promoting.

“A lot of fighters make misakes about working their image and how they market themselves,” he said. “I think there’s a way of promoting yourself like (Conor) McGregor, with intelligence, like (Chael) Sonnen used to do. But I think it’s a fine line between destroying your image or building your image in the long run. I think people are thinking short term, and besides that, McGregor’s style is risky.

“(Sonnen) was a very tough fighter. He almost beat Anderson (Silva) at his height, and I see a lot of friends of mine who don’t follow fighting, and they used to say, Sonnen just talks and he’s not that good. He created that image. He created that image so much for himself that people don’t think he’s that good. So I think it’s a risk when you do that.”

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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