Joseph Morales meets Deiveson Figueiredo at UFC Fight Night 125 in Brazil

It looks like the UFC’s first event in Belem, Brazil, is starting to take shape.

Deiveson Figueiredo (13-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) is set to take on Joseph Morales (9-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC) in a battle of unbeaten flyweights at UFC Fight Night 125. The matchup was announced by the fighters on their social media channels after an initial report from Brazilian news outlet Combate. UFC officials have not yet made a formal announcement of the booking.

UFC Fight Night 125 takes place Feb. 3 at Mangueirinho Gymnasium in Belem, Para, Brazil. The card is likely to air on FS1 following early prelims on UFC Fight Pass.

Figueiredo had to go to the judges’ scorecards for just the second time in his pro career in October, but took a split decision from Jarred Brooks at UFC Fight Night 119 in Brazil. Prior to that, he made his promotional debut at UFC 212 in June and picked up a TKO win over Marco Beltran.

Morales made his promotional debut at UFC Fight Night 114 in August in Mexico City and submitted Roberto Sanchez in the first round. He had come to the UFC on the strength of an eight-fight winning streak to open his career, including a TKO win under the CFFC banner. The win over Sanchez gave the 23-year-old Team Alpha Male-based Californian five submissions in his nine victories.

For more on UFC Fight Night in Belem, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Jarred Brooks got nods from Jose Aldo, Anthony Kiedis, now wants to replace Henry Cejudo

UFC flyweight Jarred Brooks is not all bent out of shape after his first professional loss, even if the people around him are.

There was talk in his camp of an appeal of a split-call loss to Deiveson Figueiredo (13-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) at UFC Fight Night 119, which took place Oct. 28 at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Brooks (13-1 MMA, 1-1 UFC) isn’t interested in going that route.

“Everyone’s like, ‘Oh, this undefeated thing,’ and it’s not a big deal,” Brooks told MMAjunkie. “I don’t really care if I take a loss. I’m still looking down the road, and I’m still looking at a UFC belt. If I take losses on the way to the UFC belt, that’s my learning process.”

Brooks appeared to control much of the fight with his wrestling and avoid Figueiredo’s power shots. But the ones that landed convinced two of three judges to give the Brazilian the fight via scores of 29-28.

It didn’t take long for Brooks to arrive at the conclusion he had to let it go. Five minutes after the fight, he was already thinking about his next step.

“I’ve lost in wrestling, and I’ve tried to dwell on my losses too much in wrestling, and it made me hate the sport,” he said. “So I’m not going to do that in this sport. I love it too much.”

The blow of Brooks’ first loss certainly was softened by the response he got when he left the cage. He was approached by UFC executive Reed Harris, who said Red Hot Chili Peppers frontman Anthony Kiedis was watching the fight and thought he got the shaft. Then he saw former UFC featherweight champ Jose Aldo, who said the same thing.

“Man, I was really starstruck,” Brooks said. “I was like, in awe.”

What would help the up-and-comer really get over the whole experience is a quick turnaround. Brooks is eyeing a short-notice replacement if the opportunity arises. A fight with Sergio Pettis would be top on his list, of course, if Pettis’ opponent, onetime title challenger Henry Cejudo, is unable to fight at UFC 218 after a close call in the recent fires in Northern California.

Then there’s up-and-comer Ben Nguyen, who’s won four of five in the octagon and most recently dispatched onetime title challenger Tim Elliott.

Whoever it is, Brooks is undeterred by his recent setback.

“I’m going to get that UFC belt,” he said.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Mike Dolce makes passionate case for serious, industry-wide discussion around weight-cutting

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Mike Dolce said a deeper, larger conversation around weight-cutting in MMA is probably imminent. But unless we start soon, it just might happen for the wrong reasons.

The ugly sides of severe weight cuts seem to manifest themselves in different ways each week. Just this past Friday, reporters and officials saw UFC flyweight Deiveson Figueiredo actually cry on his way to the scale before making the 126-pound limit. Lightweight Kevin Lee made no excuses for his recent loss to Tony Ferguson in an interim title affair, but talked about how his publicly tough cut  “damn near killed” him.

Examples abound, but perhaps the most striking recent one was that of Sam Alvey (31-10 MMA, 8-5 UFC). By taking a UFC Fight Night 118 fight on 10 days’ notice, the middleweight also agreed to a more than 40-pound cut. He missed by three pounds – and the next day lost to Ramazan Emeev after an apathetic display.

For Dolce, a former MMA fighter and current nutrition specialist who’s helped his fair share of UFC athletes to the scale, Alvey is an example of what happens when fighters who are so far off their division marks take on short-notice calls.

“This is where people get hurt,” Dolce told MMAjunkie Radio. “This is what brings a black eye to the sport.”

If on the one hand there’s an effort to bring in qualified professionals to ensure proper cuts, Dolce said, he wonders where the UFC’s great team of specialists was when it was time to advise on Alvey. Especially considering that, in this time frame and with air-travel included, the weight loss would mostly happen via dehydration.

“So this young man is going to dehydrate himself 30-plus pounds in under 10 days and then have that baseball bat swung in his skull for 15 minutes,” Dolce said. “How is this a good idea?”

More than pointing fingers, Dolce said, there’s a learning opportunity here. But that would mean taking measures much beyond the “bureaucracy and red tape” of the 10-point plan approved by the California State Athletic Commission in May.

“The onus must be on the athlete,” Dolce said. “If there was a penalty to Sam – ‘Hey, Sam, we want to give you a fight in 10 days, on another continent. You’re 40 pounds over right now. Whatever. That’s your responsibility. But if you miss weight, we’re going to fine you 50 percent of your purse, and we’re going to suspend you for six months – if you miss weight within three pounds. If you miss weight for over three pounds, you are immediately pulled from the card and then that ban is a 12-month ban.’

“Will Sam Alvey – will any fighter – then take that fight? It’s actually protecting fighters from their own toughness.”

Dolce elaborated on his issues with the 10-point plan, which he said can be easily bypassed by fighters.

“Specific (urine) gravity testing? So easy to beat,” Dolce said. “Thirteen-year-olds in Iowa beat that every single season. The 30-day, the 10-day (weight check) – athletes hack that. I know the athletes right now are hacking that at California, laughing at California while they have their game in their scales. It’s silly. All this red tape is silly.”

Another issue that Dolce takes with the plan is the “suspect” limit of 10 percent of their body mass that any given fighter is allowed to have gained back by fight night. That type of measure, Dolce said, should be analyzed on an individual basis – or it will only discourage fighters to rehydrate properly.

“How is that in the interest of the athletes’ health and safety?” Dolce said. “What science actually says that you can’t hydrate more than 10 percent or you’re unhealthy? Because all the science points to adequate hydration, with no specific percentage and no specific cap.”

What can be done to change things, though? For Dolce, first there needs to be a general mobilization around the seriousness of the issue. Which includes the media. Right now, he said, headlines alerting to the dangers of weight cuts are sparsely thrown around and quickly drowned out in the noise as the MMA world moves on.

That can start with people actually paying attention when fighters like Lee, Cris Cyborg, Khabib Nurmagomedov and Anthony Pettis talk about how their harrowing cuts felt like near-death experiences.

“Does anybody listen to this?” Dolce said. “Is anybody paying attention to this? And what is being done about it other than a few articles showing up on a few websites and then it disappears? Then the industry just moves on.

“It’s like the industry is just waiting for the worst-case scenario to happen before there’s a cultural change.”

For Dolce, in order to ensure safety, harsher penalties should be placed upon fighters. They should also be expected to be in shape for 52 weeks of the year. And, as a general rule, he said they should always be physically able to take any fight on six weeks’ notice.

If in a case like Alvey’s something ends up going terribly wrong, Dolce ponders, who’s to blame? Cases can be argued for the the promotion, for the local athletic commission or even for the management team. Ultimately, though, it’s the fighter who’ll bear the consequences.

“But is there any other contributory element to that?” Dolce said. “That’s a much deeper larger conversation that can be had. And probably will be had for the wrong reasons within the next few years if we don’t do something about it.”

To hear more from Dolce, check out the video above.

And for more on the upcoming MMA schedule, check out the MMA Rumors section of the site.

MMAjunkie Radio broadcasts Monday-Friday at 1 p.m. ET (10 a.m. PT) live from Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino’s Race & Sports Book. The show is hosted by “Gorgeous” George Garcia and producer Brian “Goze” Garcia. For more information or to download past episodes, go towww.mmajunkie.com/radio.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Before split call was announced, Deiveson Figueiredo thought he'd lost to Jarred Brooks

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SAO PAULO – When the flyweight bout between Deiveson Figueiredo and Jarred Brooks ended on Saturday, both fighters raised their arms in celebration.

But at least one of them wasn’t that convinced the UFC Fight Night 119 contest would go his way.

After dropping his first career loss in a split decision to Figueiredo (13-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC), Brooks (13-1 MMA, 1-1 UFC) said that, while he did factor in his opponent’s home advantage, he’d “definitely” thought he’d earned a 30-27 win – thought with which one of the octagon-side judges, as well as the majority of MMAjunkie readers, agreed.

Figueiredo, on his end, wasn’t exactly expecting to hear his name.

“It was a tough fight,” Figueiredo said after the preliminary card bout, which streamed live on UFC Fight Pass from Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo, Brazil. “I thought, by the end, that I’d lost. But I celebrated anyway.

“Yes, I was (nervous I wouldn’t get the nod). But I think one day I’ll have to lose. If I’d lost (on Saturday), it’d be with honor because I fought to the end and didn’t give up. Thankfully, I got the win. Fortunately, he said I was going to come out crying but he was the one who left crying.”

Which is not to say that Figueiredo lacks self-awareness when it comes to his display on Saturday. After a rough weight cut that had him crying as he made his way to the scale – and Brooks subsequently mocking him for it at the ceremonial weigh-ins – he does consider the possibility that took a toll.

But, mostly, Figueiredo believes there was simply not enough preparation to stop Brooks’ takedowns.

“I don’t know if it was the weight cut that left my legs weaker, or if it was more about training,” Figueiredo said. “But I believe it was the training. (I have to) improve this takedown defense. I lacked explosion – getting back up quickly if he takes me down.

“He took me down too easily. I’m going to work to work on that, so I can come back even stronger.”

Controversial as it was, only one fighter left with an unblemished record from the UFC Fight Night 119 encounter – an outcome that Figueiredo ultimately attributes to his will power, and some powerful shots he started landing in the second frame.

“From the second to the third, he started gassing, and I got better,” Figueiredo said. “I think that’s what made me win the fight.”

Figueiredo admits to some frustration as Brooks kept escaping the same guillotine choke that the Brazilian had used to finish three of his previous opponents. But he’s not willing to give up on the move just yet.

“I’ll have to find that adjustment,” Figueiredo said. “I’ll switch arms. I’ll use my right one, since the left one isn’t working.”

In order to make the improvements that he has in mind, Figueiredo is eyeing a training stint in the U.S. While he’s still waiting on talks with his coaches and negotiations for financial support, he’s already got three different gyms in mind – though he’d only name one, Jacksonwink-MMA, where longtime friend and MMA mentor Iuri Alcantara trains.

When it comes to adding to his 2-0 octagon record, Figueiredo says he would be open to fighting again before the end of the year. But he would also love to be part of the UFC’s next Brazilian outing, which is set for Jan. 3 in his home state of Para.

As for whom he’d like to share the octagon with in either of those dates? Well, let’s just say potential opponents don’t really faze Figueiredo.

“The only thing I’m afraid of is crying again in my weight cut,” Figueiredo joked.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 119 post-event facts: Is this the end of Lyoto Machida?

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Filed under: Featured, News, UFC

Derek Brunson pulled off yet another remarkable first-round knockout on Saturday when in the UFC Fight Night 119 headliner he became the fastest to ever defeat former UFC champion Lyoto Machida.

Brunson (18-5 MMA, 9-3 UFC) used his dangerous left hand to set up a quick finish of Machida (22-8 MMA, 14-8 UFC) in the FS1-televised middleweight headliner at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo. Prelims aired on FS2 and UFC Fight Pass.

As a result, “The One” is becoming a fixture in the UFC 185-pound record books.

The UFC’s sixth stop in Sao Paulo saw Brazilian fighters win nine of 12 bouts. For more on the numbers behind the card, check below for 55 post-event facts about UFC Fight Night 119.

* * * *

General

Brazilian fighters fell to 3-7 main event fights on home soil dating back to December 2014.

The UFC-Reebok Athlete Outfitting payout for the event totaled $170,000.

Debuting fighters went 0-1 at the event.

Brunson, Pedro Munhoz, Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos and Max Griffin earned $50,000 UFC Fight Night 119 fight-night bonuses.

UFC Fight Night 119 drew an announced attendance of 10,265. No live gate was disclosed for the event.

Betting favorites went 8-3 on the card. One fight had even odds.

Total fight time for the 12-bout card was 1:57:18.

Main card

Brunson’s nine UFC victories since 2012 in middleweight competition are tied with Brad Tavares for most in the division.

Brunson has earned seven of his nine UFC victories by stoppage.

Brunson’s seven UFC stoppage victories since 2012 in middleweight competition are tied for most in the division.

Brunson’s seven first-round stoppage victories in UFC middleweight competition are most in divisional history.

Machida fell to 5-7 in UFC main event fights.

Machida’s three-fight losing skid is the longest of his career. He hasn’t earned a victory since December 2014.

Machida fell to 3-4 since he dropped to the UFC middleweight division in October 2013.

Machida has suffered three of his four UFC middleweight losses by stoppage.

Colby Covington’s (13-1 MMA, 8-1 UFC) five-fight UFC winning streak in welterweight competition is the second longest active streak in the division behind Kamaru Usman (six).

Covington attempted no takedowns in a fight for the first time in his UFC career. He landed 41 takedowns combined in his previous eight UFC appearances.

Demian Maia (25-8 MMA, 19-8 UFC) fell to 10-4 since he dropped to the UFC welterweight division in July 2012.

Maia is a combined 0-for-35 on takedown attempts over his past two UFC appearances.

Maia has suffered seven of his eight UFC losses by decision.

Pedro Munhoz and Rob Font

Munhoz’s (15-2 MMA, 5-2 UFC) four-fight UFC winning streak in bantamweight competition is the third longest active streak in the division behind champ Cody Garbrandt (five) and Jimmie Rivera (five).

Munhoz has earned four of his five UFC victories by stoppage.

Munhoz’s three submission victories in UFC bantamweight competition are tied for second most in divisional history behind Urijah Faber (six).

Rob Font (14-3 MMA, 4-2 UFC) suffered the first submission loss of his career.

Francisco Trinaldo’s (22-5 MMA, 12-4 UFC) 11 victories since 2011 in UFC lightweight competition are tied with Donald Cerrone for most in the division.

Trinaldo has earned seven of his past nine victories by decision.

Jim Miller (28-11 MMA, 17-10 UFC) three-fight losing skid is the longest of his career. He hasn’t earned a victory since November 2016.

Miller fell to 4-7 in his past 11 UFC appearances.

Miller’s total fight time of 4:57:53 in UFC lightweight competition is most in divisional history.

Miller has suffered eight of his 11 career losses by decision.

Thiago “Marreta” Santos (16-5 MMA, 8-4 UFC) has earned seven of his eight UFC victories by knockout.

Santos’ seven knockout victories in UFC middleweight fights are tied with champ Michael Bisping and Chris Leben for second most in divisional history behind Anderson Silva (eight).

Thiago “Marreta” Santos

Santos’ seven knockouts since 2014 in UFC competition are tied for second most in the company behind Derrick Lewis (eight).

Jack Hermansson (16-4 MMA, 3-2 UFC) suffered the first knockout loss of his career.

John Lineker (30-8 MMA, 11-3 UFC) improved to 5-1 since he moved up to the UFC bantamweight division in September 2015.

Marlon Vera (10-4-1 MMA, 4-3 UFC) has suffered all four of his career losses by decision.

Preliminary card

Vicente Luque (12-6-1 MMA, 5-2 UFC) has earned 11 of his 12 career victories by stoppage. That includes all five of his UFC wins.

Luque’s five stoppage victories since 2015 in UFC competition are tied for second most in the company behind Lewis (six).

Luque’s two D’arce choke victories in UFC competition are tied with Dustin Poirier for second most in company history behind Tony Ferguson (three).

Niko Price (10-1 MMA, 2-1 UFC) had his 11-fight unbeaten streak snapped for the first defeat of his career.

Antonio Carlos Junior (9-2 MMA, 6-2 UFC) improved to 5-1 (with one no-contest) since he dropped to the UFC middleweight division in June 2015.

Carlos Junior’s four-fight UFC winning streak in middleweight competition is the third longest active streak in the division behind Robert Whittaker (seven) and Bisping (five).

Carlos Junior has earned all of his career stoppage victories by submission.

Jack Marshman (22-7 MMA, 2-2 UFC) suffered the first submission loss of his career.

Hacran Dias’ (23-6-1 MMA, 3-5 UFC) three-fight losing skid is the longest of his career. He hasn’t earned a victory since June 2015.

Dias has suffered all six of his career losses by decision.

Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos

Zaleski dos Santos’ (18-5 MMA, 4-1 UFC) four-fight UFC winning streak in welterweight competition is tied for the third longest active streak in the division behind Kamaru Usman (six) and Covington (five).

Dos Santos has earned three of his four UFC victories by decision.

Griffin (13-4 MMA, 1-2 UFC) has suffered three of his four career losses by decision.

Deiveson Figueiredo (13-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) earned just the second decision victory of his career and first since May 1, 2014 – a span of 1,276 days (more than three years) and nine fights.

Jarred Brooks (13-1 MMA, 1-1 UFC) had his 13-fight winning streak snapped for the first defeat of his career.

Marcelo Golm (5-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC) has earned all of his career victories by stoppage.

Golm earned the first submission victory of his career.

Christian Colombo (8-3-1 MMA, 0-2-1 UFC) has suffered all three of his career losses by submission.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

FightMetric research analyst and live statistics producer Michael Carroll contributed to this story. Follow him on Twitter @MJCflipdascript.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 119 Athlete Outfitting pay: Program total passes $15 million mark

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Filed under: News, UFC

SAO PAULO – Fighters from Saturday’s UFC Fight Night 119 event took home UFC Athlete Outfitting pay, a program that launched after the UFC’s deal with Reebok, totaling $170,000.

UFC Fight Night 119 took place at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo. The card aired on FS1 following prelims on FS2 and UFC Fight Pass.

Leading the way were a number of individuals. Longtime octagon veterans Lyoto Machida (22-8 MMA, 14-8 UFC), Demian Maia (25-8 MMA, 19-8 UFC) and Jim Miller (28-11 MMA, 17-10 UFC) all earned maximum non-title-fight payouts of $20,000.

The full UFC Fight Night 119 UFC Athlete Outfitting payouts included:

Derek Brunson: $15,000
def. Lyoto Machida: $20,000

Colby Covington: $5,000
def. Demian Maia: $20,000

Pedro Munhoz: $5,000
def. Rob Font: $5,000

Francisco Trinaldo: $15,000
def. Jim Miller: $20,000

Thiago “Marreta” Santos: $10,000
def. Jack Hermansson: $2,500

John Lineker: $10,000
def. Marlon Vera: $5,000

Vicente Luque: $5,000
def. Niko Price: $2,500

Antonio Carlos Junior: $5,000
def. Jack Marshman: $2,500

Jared Gordon: $2,500
def. Hacran Dias: $5,000

Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos: $2,500
def. Max Griffin: $2,500

Deiveson Figueiredo: $2,500
def. Jarred Brooks: $2,500

Marcelo Golm: $2,500
def. Christian Colombo: $2,500

Under the UFC Athlete Outfitting program’s payout tiers, which appropriate the money generated by Reebok’s multi-year sponsorship with the UFC, fighters are paid based on their total number of UFC bouts, as well as Zuffa-era WEC fights (January 2007 and later) and Zuffa-era Strikeforce bouts (April 2011 and later). Fighters with 1-5 bouts receive $2,500 per appearance; 6-10 bouts get $5,000; 11-15 bouts earn $10,000; 16-20 bouts pocket $15,000; and 21 bouts and more get $20,000. Additionally, champions earn $40,000 while title challengers get $30,000.

In addition to experience-based pay, UFC fighters will receive in perpetuity royalty payments amounting to 20-30 percent of any UFC merchandise sold that bears their likeness, according to officials.

Full 2017 UFC-Reebok sponsorship payouts:

Year-to-date total: $4,762,500
2016 total: $7,138,000
2015 total: $3,185,000
Program-to-date total: $15,085,500

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Fight Tracks: The walkout songs of UFC Fight Night 119 with a stark 'Dragon' invoking 'Game of Thrones'

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Filed under: Blue Corner, Featured Videos, News, UFC

While it takes intense training, world-class skills and maybe even a bit of luck to register a UFC win, picking the right song to accompany you to the cage is a key talent, as well.

See what the fighters of Saturday’s UFC Fight Night 119 in Sao Paulo went with as their backing tracks.

* * * *

Derek Brunson def. Lyoto Machida via knockout (punches) – Round 1, 2:30

Derek Brunson: “HUMBLE” by Kendrick Lamar

Lyoto Machida: “Game of Thrones” theme by Ramin Djawadi

Colby Covington def. Demian Maia via unanimous decision (29-27, 30-27, 30-26)

Colby Covington: “Amazing” by Kanye West feat. Young Jeezy

Demian Maia: “Numb” by Linkin Park

Pedro Munhoz def. Rob Font via submission (guillotine choke) – Round 1, 4:03

Pedro Munhoz: “Ambitionz az a Ridah” by Tupac

Rob Font: “Welcome to Jamrock” by Damian Marley

Francisco Trinaldo def. Jim Miller via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-28, 29-28)

Francisco Trinaldo: “Can’t Be Touched” by Roy Jones Jr.

Jim Miller: “It’s a Long Way To the Top (If You Wanna Rock and Roll)” by AC/DC

Thiago “Marreta” Santos def. Jack Hermansson via TKO (punches) – Round 1, 4:59

Thiago “Marreta” Santos: “Marreta Da CCD Para O Mundo” by MC Isaac Saradhino

Jack Hermansson: “The Joker” by Damien feat. Terje Tylden

John Lineker def. Marlon Vera via unanimous decision (30-27, 29-28, 29-28)

John Lineker: “Chega De Religiao” by Ultima Geracao

Marlon Vera: “Entourage” by Nick Lewis feat. Brandon J. Walker
Vicente Luque def. Niko Price via submission (D’arce choke) – Round 2, 4:08

Vicente Luque: “Baby Baby” by Tropkillaz

Niko Price: “Coming Home” by Diddy Dirty Money feat. Skylar Grey

Antonio Carlos Junior def. Jack Marshman via submission (rear-naked choke) – Round 1

Antonio Carlos Junior: “Let’s Twist Again” by Chubby Checker

Jack Marshman: “Tick Tock” by Giggs

Jared Gordon Gordon def. Hacran Dias via unanimous decision (29-26, 29-27, 30-26)

Jared Gordon: “Flash” by Queen

Hacran Dias: “Last Breath” by Future

Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos def. Max Griffin via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-27, 29-28)

Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos: “The Final Countdown” by Europe

Max Griffin: “Sucker For Pain” by Lil’ Wayne, Wiz Khalifa & Imagine Dragons

Deiveson Figueiredo def. Jarred Brooks via split decision (27-30, 29-28, 29-28)

Deiveson Figueiredo: “Follow U (Xilent Remix)” by Yogi feat. Ayah Marar

Jarred Brooks: “Me de Amor” by Sango

Marcelo Golm def. Christian Colombo via submission (rear-naked choke) – Round 1, 2:08

Marcelo Golm: “Close My Eyes” by Tupac

Christian Colombo: “Godzilla” by Blue Oyster Cult

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Hometown cooking or right call? Here's the Figueiredo vs. Brooks scorecard from UFC-Sao Paulo

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Flyweight prospects Deiveson Figueiredo and Jarred Brooks entered UFC Fight Night 119 on Saturday with a combined professional record of 25-0. One man had to experience a setback for the first time, and it came in one of the more frustrating fashions possible.

Brooks (13-1 MMA, 1-1 UFC) suffered his first career defeat when he dropped a narrow split decision to Figueiredo (13-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) in the 125-pound bout, which streamed on UFC Fight Pass prior to the televised prelims on FS2 and main card on FS1 at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo.

It was clear once the scorecards were read that Brooks was in disbelief over the result. One judge game him a 30-27, but the others had it 29-28 in favor of Figueiredo.

Check out the official scorecard below to see how each round was scored.

Although it was a close fight, Brooks scored six more takedowns and 11 more significant strikes than his opponent over the course of three rounds. Figueiredo landed the more damaging blows and attacked with submission, and the result was a split decision.

Brooks said afterward he felt he won all three rounds.

“Deiveson grabbed the fence at least four or five times when I could have slammed him on his head,” Brooks said after the fight. “I am in Sao Paulo, Brazil, so you have got to expect that when it goes to a decision, but I definitely thought I won that 30-27 like the first judge did. I would love to fight Deiveson in the future. He is a good opponent, don´t get me wrong, but I think I won the fight.”

Several fighters watching gave their thoughts on social media, and the majority felt the judges got it wrong.

How did you score the bout between Figueiredo and Brooks? Vote in the poll below.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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UFC Fight Night 119 results: Deiveson Figueiredo takes questionable split call from Jarred Brooks

Just about every time Jarred Brooks shot for a takedown, a guillotine was waiting from Deiveson Figueiredo.

It was Figueiredo’s (13-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) heavy punches, however, that made the difference on the judges’ scorecards, resulting in a split decision over Brooks (13-1 MMA, 1-1 UFC).

The lightweight bout was part of the preliminary card of today’s UFC Fight Night 119 event at Ibirapuera Gymnasium in Sao Paulo. It streamed on UFC Fight Pass ahead of additional prelims on FS2 and a main card on FS1.

One judge scored the fight 30-27 for Brooks, a likely reflection of his wrestling dominance throughout the fight. The other two, however, gave Figueiredo 29-28 scores. Despite a brutal weight cut and a hometown advantage, the Brazilian Figueiredo didn’t get much love from the crowd after the decision was announced.

Figueiredo and Brooks jawed at the weigh-ins and were amped as they entered the octagon. But instead of slug it out, they mostly played a game of cat and mouse as Brooks circled away from Figueiredo’s punches and timed takedowns. The American’s early efforts were hugely successful, with high-amplitude slams putting Figueiredo on his back. By the end of the first, Figueiredo was eating a steady diet of shots from his back.

The Brazilian adjusted in the second round, however, and gave Brooks more of a reason to respect his distance. A stinging right forced Brooks backward, and when he went for a takedown, a guillotine attempt followed. The choke looked good for a few seconds. But Brooks hung tough and popped his head out, a sequence that would repeat itself for the rest of the fight.

In the final frame, Figueiredo had figured out Brooks’ timing even better and managed to stay upright for most of the round. He gave chase on the feet and landed several power shots. Brooks pulled off a big suplex, only to fight off a kimura attempt. But that submission attempt, like all the other guillotines, were not sound enough to succeed.

Figueiredo now improves to two straight UFC wins, while Brooks suffers the first loss of his professional career after 13 wins including a successful octagon debut.

Up-to-the-minute UFC Fight Night 119 results include:

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 119, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

(MMAjunkie’s John Morgan and Fernanda Prates contributed to this report on site in Sao Paulo.)

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Source: MMA Junkie