Daniel Kelly vs. Elias Theodorou slated for UFC Fight Night 121 in Australia

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November’s UFC return to Australia has a new middleweight bout.

Officials recently announced a UFC Fight Night 121 matchup with Daniel Kelly (13-2 MMA, 6-2 UFC) vs. Elias Theodorou (13-2 MMA, 5-2 UFC).

UFC Fight Night 121 takes place Nov. 19 (but airs in the U.S. on Nov. 18 due to time difference) at Qudos Bank Arena in Sydney. It’s expected to air on FS1 following early prelims on UFC Fight Pass, though the full fight card and bout order haven’t been finalized.

Both Kelly and Theodorou were previously ranked but currently reside outside of the top 15 of the USA TODAY Sports/MMAjunkie MMA middleweight rankings.

Kelly, a 39-year-old Australian fan favorite, was riding high with a four-fight winning streak that included a split-decision victory over former champ Rashad Evans. However, in his most recent bout, the four-time Olympic judoka suffered a quick 76-second loss to Derek Brunson in June’s UFC Fight Night 110 co-headliner.

He looks to rebound against a fellow fan fave in Theodorou, a 29-year-old Canadian who won “The Ultimate Fighter Nations: Canada vs. Australia” in 2014. It was part of a promising 5-1 start to his UFC career. However, in his most recent bout, Theodorou suffered a unanimous-decision defeat to vet Brad Tavares at The Ultimate Fighter 25 Finale in July.

The latest UFC Fight Night 121 card includes:

  • Mark Hunt vs. Marcin Tybura
  • Joanne Calderwood vs. Bec Rawlings
  • Belal Muhammad vs. Jesse Taylor
  • Jeremy Kennedy vs. Alex Volkanovski
  • Rashad Coulter vs. Tai Tuivasa
  • Ryan Benoit vs. Ashkan Mokhtarian
  • Alex Chambers vs. Nadia Kassem
  • Daniel Kelly vs. Elias Theodorou

For more on UFC Fight Night 121, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Twitter Mailbag: Was post-fight Jon Jones the real one, or just a convincing fake?

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In this week’s Twitter Mailbag, was the UFC light-heavyweight champion extending a sincere olive branch to his vanquished challenger, and where does all this leave the former champ’s legacy? Plus, is GSP-Bisping the fight that no one but the participants has been asking for? And can you really blackmail your way into an apology from the UFC president?

All that and more in this edition of the TMB. To ask a question of your own, tweet it to @BenFowlkesMMA.

* * * *

I think he was being sincere. The things Jon Jones said about Daniel Cormier immediately after the fight were not so different from what he said about him a few days before the fight. Talking to reporters after the open workouts, Jones called Cormier “a good (expletive) dude” and admitted to liking him as a person. What stopped them from getting along, he said, was that Cormier had this weird hangup that simply wouldn’t allow him to admit that Jones was better than he was.

Now, we hear that and we can spot the ridiculousness in the argument. Of course Cormier can’t admit that. He’s one of the best fighters in the world. His whole life is about being the absolute best. He’s not killing himself in the gym just to be second place. How could Jones not realize that?

I think the answer has to do with the inherent narcissism that comes with being the best fighter in the world. It’s so obvious to Jones that everyone else is just a character in his story. So why can’t they see it, and just be happy to have a supporting role in the great drama?

That’s where his head seemed to be at before the fight. Once Jones had knocked out Cormier, then he was free to let his guard down and admit that Cormier was a good guy and a great fighter. Why not? If you praise him now, it just makes you seem greater for having beaten him. And it’s not like anybody will get confused about who the best is while Cormier is stumbling around off-camera.

So yes, I think he meant every word. I also don’t think for one second that he would have uttered anything close to that if he’d lost.

The book isn’t closed on Cormier just yet. He could stick around at light heavyweight and still trash nearly everyone in the top 15. Or he could go to heavyweight and end up fighting for the title by this time next year. A lot depends on what he wants to do next, so it’s hard to make too many sweeping statements about his legacy.

That said, if it ends here? I wouldn’t be surprised if the collective conventional wisdom fails to give Cormier his due. He was champion in the absence of Jones, that’s true. In a different era, he might have been his own dynasty. In my book, that puts him ahead of Tito Ortiz and somewhere right behind Chuck Liddell. Both those guys should be glad they came along before Jones did.

Yes. However he wants.

Tempers seem to have cooled somewhat between Tyron Woodley and UFC President Dana White, but you’re right, that was not a great strategic move on the champ’s part. The problem with trying to blackmail your way into an apology is that even if you get what you want, what does it really mean? An apology given just to stop something bad from happening is completely insincere, thus defeating the entire point.

Then there’s the question of what you’re supposed to do about it if you don’t get the apology. Assuming Woodley really does have damaging info on the UFC, leaking it because the boss hurt his feelings would probably not improve his relationship with his employers. It also doesn’t turn him into some hero of transparency in the eyes of the public, because he already told us that the only reason he was telling secrets is because White wouldn’t say he was sorry.

Of course, if White doesn’t give you that public apology and then you back down from your leak threat anyway, it just makes you look weak and desperate.

That brings us to what actually happened in the end to resolve this situation (at least for now). According to White, he spoke to Woodley privately and smoothed things over. Also according to White, Woodley explained his outrage and his threats by saying that “he was just pissed and upset and didn’t mean it.” Maybe it’s just the source, but it kind of sounds like the apology went in the opposite direction.

I see the logic at work here, but how do you enforce something like that? Especially when MMA referees seem to have such a hard time enforcing the existing rules. What, do we require fighters to tell the ref in advance what they’re game plan is, so the ref can be on higher alert for illegal moves that might nullify it? Is the ref then required to share that info with the opponent, so he can know which type of cheating will be more severely punished?

The only fix I can see is that we either allow fence-grabbing or we don’t. And if we don’t, then why aren’t fighters punished as soon as they do it? It’s not like they’re learning the rules on the fly. And a fence grab isn’t like throwing an inside leg kick and accidentally hitting the groin. It’s something you can only do on purpose. So why aren’t you penalized the moment you do it, regardless of what your opponent’s game plan is?

There’s a growing sense that this is the fight no one asked for outside of Michael Bisping and Georges St-Pierre themselves. And that’s funny, since the reason they both seem so intent on it is because they’re convinced it will make a lot of money. But how does it make money if fans are lukewarm about it?

It’s possible that we’re just suffering from hype fatigue. They’re been talking this fight up for over a year, and still nothing. Maybe by the time it actually happens we’ll have changed our tune. The return of GSP is always going to be a big deal, and Bisping is so easily hatable whenever he opens his mouth that you know he’ll convince some people to pay just on the hope that he’ll get beaten up.

But right now? I can’t say I’m excited. There are so many compelling fights for Bisping at middleweight, and welterweight is going to need some help very soon. The more I think about this fight, the more it seems like we’re all being asked to go along so that the already rich guys can make more money. Maybe it’s just me, but that is not a compelling sales pitch.

Oh, Cameron. Are you really going to force me to be the jerk who points out that there is a difference between being a legend and just being old? Not that I don’t have a lot of affection for Daniel Kelly, who seems awesome, but he’s also 13-2 at the age of 39. Sam Alvey beat him in 2015, when he had to cover slightly fewer body parts in supportive wrap, but he still wasn’t exactly a young sprout back then.

Rashad Evans is a slightly different story (even if he does have a recent split-decision loss to Kelly). He’s also edging into his late 30s, but he’s a former UFC light-heavyweight champion. Then again, he’s on a three-fight losing skid and has dropped five of his past seven.

You really want to know how far this is from being a part of any kind of legends tour? Just look at where it is, in the middle of the main card at UFC Fight Night 114 in Mexico City, on the week after the biggest pay-per-view of the year. Does that seem like where you’d stick your legends, if you thought they still qualified as such?

I suspect you are not the only one, especially since the UFC chief recently went out of his way to disparage both champions who are slated to defend their titles at UFC 215. Plus, those other three fights each feature a former champ, and they’re all likely to be exciting, competitive matchups.

That makes you wonder how they’ll do on pay-per-view, doesn’t it? We know that the UFC has written Demetrious Johnson off as box-office poison. Amanda Nunes hasn’t been a huge draw either, and is probably less of one after pulling out of UFC 213 and getting scorched by the boss for it. But that undercard? How do you not pony up the dough to see those fights? Even if you’re not that interested in what follows.

This feels a little like a return to the old UFC strategy, back before it could rely on any one fighter to sell tons of PPVs. If the main attraction won’t do it, you have to make your case in the aggregate. Honestly, this lineup looks like a pretty good way of doing just that.

From the sound of it, Volkan Oezdemir likes that fight too, and he’s even suggested that the winner would be dubbed “the real king of Europe,” which is obviously pretty awesome.

If I’m Alexander Gustafsson, I might rather wait for Jones. But if Jones is holding out for a big money fight with someone like Brock Lesnar, how long does Gustafsson really want to sit around waiting and not making money?

As for whether “No Time” has it in him to be the division’s new knockout artist, early indicators are good. But let’s not forget that in recent years there’s been a major drop-off in talent in that division once you get past the top three or four. If Oezdemir wants to prove he belongs in that elite club, Gustafsson’s a tough test to get in.

Ben Fowlkes is MMAjunkie and USA TODAY’s MMA columnist. Follow him on Twitter at @BenFowlkesMMA. Twitter Mailbag appears every Thursday on MMAjunkie.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC-Auckland's 10 memorable moments, including Derrick Lewis' bombshell

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UFC Fight Night 110 started off slowly. The first four fights went the distance, but when things picked up steam, the card moved along rather nicely with all but one of the final six bouts ending in a finish. Those finishes included the heavyweight main event between Mark Hunt and Derrick Lewis.

Lewis entered the FS1-televised headliner on a six-fight winning streak, but despite his best efforts, he was unable to extend that streak to seven, and instead, he tasted defeat for the first time in almost two years. During the four-round contest, Lewis went deep into his bag of tricks, attempting high kicks, flying knees and even thinking about a spinning kick, but Hunt calmly took everything he had to offer. And when his opponent’s gas tank hit empty, Hunt closed the deal with strikes against the fence.

In the co-main event, another winning streak came to a close as fan favorite Daniel Kelly fell to Derek Brunson via knockout in less than 90 seconds.

UFC Fight Night 110 took place Saturday at Spark Arena in Auckland, New Zealand.

Here are 10 memorable moments from the event.

1. Sticking around

The Hunt (13-11-1 MMA, 8-5-1 UFC) and Lewis (18-5 MMA, 9-3 UFC) bout lasted longer than many expected, grinding along until late in the fourth round. The end came when an exhausted Lewis put his hands on his hips and backed into the fence, where Hunt delivered a few strikes before referee Marc Goddard waved off the contest.

The finish was more whimper than bang, but it showed that even at 43, Hunt remains a force in the UFC heavyweight division.

After his victory, Hunt, the oldest fighter in the UFC, said he plans on sticking around until he fights out the reported six-fight deal he signed in April 2016.

“I like to get beat up,” Hunt told MMAjunkie. “Shucks, there’s nothing else I’m good at. But I’ve got a couple of fights I want to finish. Why not see the contract out and then retire?”

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2. Somebody’s watching me

“It’s probably my last fight,” Lewis told UFC commentator Brian Stann after his loss to Hunt. “I’m getting married next week, and I don’t like to put my family through this. That will be my last fight.”

We all know MMA retirements have a tendency not to last, especially when they come seconds after a loss in a big fight. That didn’t stop two of Lewis’ fellow UFC heavyweights from commenting on his possible retirement via social media.

Travis Browne, whom Lewis knocked out in February, questioned Lewis’ heart in an Instagram post and offered to run back their fight, while up and coming Francis Ngannou tweeted that Hunt beat Lewis “like a baby.”

3. Back on track

Between August 2014 and September 2016, Brunson ran off five straight middleweight wins, with four victories coming via first-round knockout. Brunson’s stock took a hit after he dropped his next two fights, losing to Robert Whittaker and Anderson Silva. Expect a market correction when it comes to Brunson (17-5 MMA, 8-3 UFC) after his first-round knockout win over Kelly (13-2 MMA, 6-2 UFC).

Brunson faced criticism for his style in the Whittaker and Silva fights. He was reckless against Whittaker and not aggressive enough against Silva. Brunson found a middle ground vs. Kelly by throwing out jabs and kicks to measure distance and timing, and when he saw an opening, he threw a hard left that dropped Kelly. A few hammerfists later, Brunson was back in the win column while bringing an abrupt end to Kelly’s four-fight winning streak.

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4. Move pays off

Dan Hooker joined the UFC’s featherweight division following a run as the Australian Fighting Championships lightweight titleholder. Three years into his UFC tenure, Hooker’s record stood at 3-3, and he decided to give lightweight another shot, starting at UFC Fight Night 110. That move paid off in a big way.

Moments after his corner implored their fighter to find his range, Hooker (14-7 MMA, 4-3 UFC) connected with a knee to the chin that sent Ross Pearson (19-14 MMA, 11-11 UFC) to the mat while simultaneously launching his mouthpiece into the air. That perfectly timed strike, which ended the fight at the 3:02 mark of Round 2, earned Hooker a $50,000 “Performance of the Night” bonus.

After the contest, Hooker told MMAjunkie he will be sticking around at lightweight.

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5. Say goodnight

Ion Cutelaba was a bit belligerent at the weigh-in, where he refused to shake the hand of light-heavyweight opponent Henrique da Silva and lunging toward him. Cutelaba (13-3 MMA, 2-2 UFC) upped his aggression on fight night, marching across the cage during introductions and dragging his thumb across his throat as he got in da Silva’s (12-3 MMA, 2-3 UFC) face.

Cutelaba backed up his pugnaciousness once the fight began, throwing his punches with fight-ending intentions. Cutelaba knocked down da Silva early and didn’t let up once his opponent was hurt. He landed heavy rights from inside da Silva’s guard and ended the fight in 22 seconds.

After the victory, Cutelaba told Stann he was in a hurry to end the contest so he could say goodnight to his infant daughter, who was home in Moldova.

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6. That’ll change your mood

Ben Nguyen was bummed out when he lost his chance to face Joseph Benavidez at UFC Fight Night 110. After his “Performance of the Night” winning effort against late replacement Tim Elliott, Nguyen’s mood improved significantly.

Nguyen’s aggressive striking had Elliott (14-8-1 MMA, 3-6 UFC) looking for takedowns early. After some scrambling on the mat, Nguyen (17-6 MMA, 4-1 UFC) slipped in the hooks and sank in a rear-naked choke that ended the flyweight fight in 49 seconds. The loss was Elliott’s first submission defeat since Benavidez stopped him via guillotine choke in April 2014.

The quick stoppage will keep Nguyen in the mix to face a top-five opponent in his next outing, maybe even Benavidez if he heals up in time for that booking.

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7. No power outage

Alexander Volkanovski displayed some mean ground and pound in his UFC debut in November, earning a second-round TKO win over Yusuke Kasuya in a lightweight bout. Volkanovski dropped to featherweight for his UFC Fight Night 110 fight against Mizuto Hirota, and he brought his heavy hands with him.

Volkanovski (15-1 MMA, 2-0 UFC) was dominant in every facet of this fight, cruising to a unanimous-decision win over Hirota (14-2 MMA, 1-1 UFC). While he wasn’t able to get the finish, it wasn’t for lack of trying, as Volkanovski came close to ending Hirota’s night in the first round after knocking him down with a right and following up with ground strikes.

The win puts Volkanovski’s winning streak at 12, with 10 stoppages.

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8. Rust? What rust?

Most UFC fighters don’t go more than three years between fights, but that’s the situation Vinc Pichel found himself in heading into UFC Fight Night 110. Pichel, who had been sidelined by what he called a “steamroll ball of (expletive)” since his May 2014 win over Anthony Njokuani, stepped into his lightweight fight against Damien Brown anxious to prove he still belonged in the UFC. He did just that.

Brown’s (16-10 MMA, 2-2 UFC) game plan was to pressure Pichel (10-1 MMA, 3-1 UFC), and for most of the first round he was successful. He put Pichel on his heels. But with less than 90 seconds left in the first stanza, Pichel, backing into the fence, delivered a crisp combination that brought the fight to an abrupt end.

After the fight, Pichel informed the division of his plans.

“I ain’t stopping,” Pichel told Stann, “I’m going to go on a rampage.”

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9. He needed that

John Moraga knew he was facing questions heading into his flyweight matchup with Ashkan Mokhtarian. The former title contender hadn’t won a fight in more than two years and was in the midst of a three-fight losing streak. Had Moraga (17-6 MMA, 6-5 UFC) lost to Mokhtarian (13-2 MMA, 0-1 UFC), a UFC newcomer, his run with the promotion would have likely come to an end.

Moraga put on a clinic against the overmatched Mokhtarian, dominating the fight in every way and earning a unanimous decision. Now back in the win column, Moraga is sure to be tested by tougher competition the next time he steps into the octagon.

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10. That’s better

J.J. Aldrich came into her second UFC fight with a full camp behind her, and it showed. Aldrich represented herself much better against Chanmi Jeon than she did in her short notice debut vs. Juliana Lima.

Aldrich (5-2 MMA, 1-1 UFC) pressured Jeon (5-1 MMA, 0-1 UFC) throughout the strawweight fight, showing solid technical striking ability on her way to a unanimous-decision win.

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For more on UFC Fight Night 110, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 110 post-event facts: Derek Brunson is the 1st-round king at middleweight

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The UFC’s second visit to New Zealand took place Saturday when Spark Arena in Auckland hosted UFC Fight Night 110, which aired on FS1 following early prelims on UFC Fight Pass.

In the main event, local hero Mark Hunt (13-11-1 MMA, 8-5-1 UFC) continued to be an ageless wonder when the 43-year-old methodically broke down and eventually stopped Derrick Lewis (18-5 MMA, 9-3 UFC) for a fourth-round TKO win in front of a jubilant crowd.

The heavyweight headliner won “Fight of the Night” honors, but it was far from the only memorable moment. Several spectacular performances occurred at UFC Fight Night 110, and for more on the numbers behind them, check out 40 post-event facts to come out of the UFC’s latest visit to Oceania.

* * * *

General

Alexander Volkanovski

The UFC-Reebok Athlete Outfitting payout for the event totaled $110,000.

Debuting fighters went 1-2 at the event.

Hunt, Lewis, Dan Hooker and Ben Nguyen earned $50,000 UFC Fight Night 110 fight-night bonuses.

UFC Fight Night 110 drew an announced attendance of 8,649 for a live gate of $830,000.

Betting favorites went 8-3 on the card.

Total fight time for the 11-bout card was 1:47:57.

Main card

Mark Hunt and Derrick Lewis

Hunt has earned all 10 of his career stoppage victories by knockout. That includes seven of his eight wins under the UFC banner.

Hunt’s seven fight-night bonuses for UFC heavyweight bouts are tied with Travis Browne for second most in divisional history behind champ Stipe Miocic (eight).

Lewis had his six-fight winning streak snapped for his first defeat since June 2015.

Lewis has suffered all three of his UFC losses by stoppage due to strikes.

Derek Brunson’s (17-5 MMA, 8-3 UFC) eight UFC victories since 2012 in middleweight competition are tied for most in the division.

Derek Brunson and Daniel Kelly

Brunson has earned six of his eight UFC victories by stoppage.

Brunson’s six first-round stoppage victories in UFC middleweight competition are most in divisional history.

Brunson’s six UFC stoppage victories since 2012 in middleweight competition are tied for most in the division.

Daniel Kelly (13-2 MMA, 6-2 UFC) has suffered both of his career losses by knockout.

Hooker (14-7 MMA, 4-3 UFC) has alternated wins and losses over his seven-fight UFC career.

Dan Hooker and Ross Pearson

Hooker has earned 13 of his 14 career victories by stoppage. That includes all four of his UFC wins.

Ross Pearson (19-14 MMA, 11-11 UFC) suffered his fourth consecutive loss to extend the longest skid of his career. He hasn’t earned a victory since March 2016.

Pearson fell to 6-7 (with one no-contest) since he returned to the UFC lightweight division in December 2012.

Ion Cutelaba (13-3 MMA, 2-2 UFC) has earned 12 of his 13 career victories by stoppage. He’s finished 10 of those wins by knockout.

Ion Cutelaba

Cutelaba’s 22-second knockout victory is the seventh fastest in UFC light-heavyweight history.

Cutelaba earned his eighth career victory in 30 seconds or less.

Henrique da Silva (12-3 MMA, 2-3 UFC) suffered the first knockout loss of his career.

Ben Nguyen (17-6 MMA, 4-1 UFC) has earned 14 of his 17 career victories by stoppage.

Ben Nguyen

Nguyen’s 49-second submission marked the second fastest finish in UFC flyweight history behind Fredy Serrano’s 44-second win at UFC Fight Night 79.

Tim Elliott (14-8-1 MMA, 3-6 UFC) fell to 1-2 since he returned to the UFC for a second stint in December.

Elliott has suffered both of his UFC stoppage losses by submission.

Alex Volkanovski (15-1 MMA, 2-0 UFC) extended his winning streak to 12 fights. He hasn’t suffered a defeat since May 2013.

Mizuto Hirota (18-8-2 MMA, 1-3-1 UFC) has suffered seven of his eight career losses by decision.

Preliminary card

Vinc Pichel

Vinc Pichel (10-1 MMA, 3-1 UFC) returned from a career-long layoff for his first victory since May 2014.

Pichel has earned eight of his 10 career victories by knockout.

Damien Brown (16-10 MMA, 2-2 UFC) suffered his first knockout loss since Nov. 19, 2011 – a span of 2,030 days (more than five years) and 19 fights.

Dominique Steele (14-9 MMA, 1-4 UFC) suffered his third consecutive loss to extend the longest skid of his career. He hasn’t earned a victory since November 2015.

John Moraga

John Moraga (17-6 MMA, 6-5 UFC) snapped a three-fight losing skid for his first victory since December 2014.

Moraga’s six victories in UFC flyweight competition are tied for third most in divisional history behind champ Demetrious Johnson (12) and Joseph Benavidez (10).

Ashkan Mokhtarian (13-2 MMA, 0-1 UFC) suffered the first decision loss of his career.

Zak Ottow

Zak Ottow (15-4 MMA, 2-1 UFC) has earned his past three victories by decision after stopping his opponent in his first 12 career wins.

Kiichi Kunimoto (18-7-2 MMA, 3-2 UFC) suffered his first decision loss since March 11, 2012 – a span of 1,917 days (more than five years) and nine fights.

Chanmi Jeon (5-1 MMA, 0-1 UFC) had her five-fight winning streak snapped for the first defeat of her career.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 110, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

FightMetric research analyst and live statistics producer Michael Carroll contributed to this story. Follow him on Twitter @MJCflipdascript.

Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 110 Athlete Outfitting pay: Ross Pearson receives top payout in KO loss

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AUCKLAND, New Zealand – Fighters from Saturday’s UFC Fight Night 110 event took home UFC Athlete Outfitting pay, a program that launched after the UFC’s deal with Reebok, totaling $110,000.

UFC Fight Night 110 took place at Spark Arena in Auckland, New Zealand. The card aired on FS1 following early prelims on UFC Fight Pass.

Despite coming out on the wrong end of one of the year’s most memorable knockouts courtesy of Dan Hooker, Ross Pearson (19-14 MMA, 11-11 UFC) was the payout leader. “The Real Deal” received a maximum non-title payout of $20,000 for his 23rd octagon appearance.

The full UFC Fight Night 110 UFC Athlete Outfitting payouts included:

Mark Hunt: $10,000
def. Derrick Lewis: $10,000

Derek Brunson: $10,000
def. Daniel Kelly: $5,000

Dan Hooker: $5,000
def. Ross Pearson: $20,000

Ion Cutelaba: $2,500
def. Luis Henrique da Silva: $2,500

Ben Nguyen: $2,500
def. Tim Elliott: $5,000

Alex Volkanovski: $2,500
def. Mizuto Hirota: $2,500

Vinc Pichel: $2,500
def. Damien Brown: $2,500

Luke Jumeau: $2,500
def. Dominique Steele: $2,500

John Moraga: $10,000
def. Ashkan Mokhtarian: $2,500

Zak Ottow: $2,500
def. Kiichi Kunimoto: $2,500

J.J. Aldrich: $2,500
def. Chanmi Jeon: $2,500

Under the UFC Athlete Outfitting program’s payout tiers, which appropriate the money generated by Reebok’s multi-year sponsorship with the UFC, fighters are paid based on their total number of UFC bouts, as well as Zuffa-era WEC fights (January 2007 and later) and Zuffa-era Strikeforce bouts (April 2011 and later). Fighters with 1-5 bouts receive $2,500 per appearance; 6-10 bouts get $5,000; 11-15 bouts earn $10,000; 16-20 bouts pocket $15,000; and 21 bouts and more get $20,000. Additionally, champions earn $40,000 while title challengers get $30,000.

In addition to experience-based pay, UFC fighters will receive in perpetuity royalty payments amounting to 20-30 percent of any UFC merchandise sold that bears their likeness, according to officials.

Full 2017 UFC-Reebok sponsorship payouts:

Year-to-date total: $2,472,500
2016 total: $7,138,000
2015 total: $3,185,000
Program-to-date total: $12,795,500

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 110, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Fight Tracks: The walkout songs of UFC Fight Night 110, spanning Kendrick Lama to AC/DC

Filed under: News, UFC

While it takes intense training, world-class skills and maybe even a bit of luck to register a UFC win, picking the right song to accompany you to the cage is a key talent, as well.

See what the fighters of Saturday’s UFC Fight Night 110 in Auckland, New Zealand, went with as their backing tracks.

* * * *

Mark Hunt def. Derrick Lewis via TKO (punches) – Round 4, 3:51

Mark Hunt: “Wickedest Man Alive” by Naughty by Nature

Derrick Lewis: “Umm Hmm” by ABN

Derek Brunson def. Daniel Kelly via knockout (punches) – Round 1, 1:16

Derek Brunson: “Humble” by Kendrick Lamar

Daniel Kelly: “Run to Paradise” by The Choirboys

Dan Hooker def. Ross Pearson via knockout (knee, punch) – Round 2, 3:02

Dan Hooker: “Runnin” by David Dallas

Ross Pearson: “Wonderwall” by Oasis

Ion Cutelaba def. Henrique da Silva via knockout (punches) – Round 1, 0:22

Ion Cutelaba: “Doina Haiducului” by Zdob si Zdub

Henrique da Silva: “Back in Black” by AC/DC

Ben Nguyen def. Tim Elliott via submission (rear-naked choke) – Round 1, 0:49

Ben Nguyen: “Inner Light” by Shocking Lemon

Tim Elliott: “Karate” by Kennedy

Alexander Volkanovski def. Mizuto Hirota via unanimous decision (30-27, 30-27, 30-27)

Alex Volkanovski: “Game of Thrones” Theme

Mizuto Hirota: “Eat the Rich” by Aerosmith

Vinc Pichel def. Damien Brown via knockout (punches) – Round 1, 3:37

Vinc Pichel: “Bad Company” by Five Finger Death Punch

Damien Brown: “Highway to Hell” by AC/DC

Luke Jumeau def. Dominique Steele via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-28, 29-28)

Luke Jumeau: “Gangsta’s Paradise” by Coolio

Dominique Steele: “DOA” by Jay-Z

John Moraga def. Ashkan Mokhtarian via unanimous decision (30-25, 30-27, 30-27)

John Moraga: “Thuggish Ruggish Bone” by Bone Thugs-n-Harmony

Ashkan Mokhtarian: “Blood on the Leaves” by Kanye West

Zak Ottow def. Kiichi Kunimoto via split decision (29-28, 28-29, 29-28)

Zak Ottow: “Gimme Shelter” by The Rolling Stones

Kiichi Kunimoto: “Immortals” by Fall Out Boy

J.J. Aldrich def. Chanmi Jeon via unanimous decision (30-27, 30-27, 30-27)

J.J. Aldrich: “The Warrior’s Code” by Dropkick Murphys

Chanmi Jeon: “Victory” by Yolanda Adams

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 110, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 110 video highlights: Derek Brunson vs. Daniel Kelly

After a controversial decision went against him in his previous bout, Derek Brunson had every reason to make sure his UFC Fight Night 110 bout didn’t go to the judges.

It didn’t even go past the first round.

One left hand from Brunson, and Daniel Kelly was on the mat. A few follow-up hammerfists later, and Brunson (17-5 MMA, 8-3 UFC) had himself a quick finish, stopping Kelly (13-2 MMA, 6-2 UFC) with strikes at the 1:16 mark of Round 1.

The middleweight bout co-headlined today’s UFC Fight Night 110 event, which took place at Spark Arena in Auckland, New Zealand. It aired on FS1 following early prelims on UFC Fight Pass.

Check out the highlights above.

Also see:

For more on UFC Fight Night 110, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Filed under: Featured Videos, News, UFC, Videos
Source: MMA Junkie

Twitter reacts to Derek Brunson's quick KO of Daniel Kelly at UFC Fight Night 110

Derek Brunson rebounded from a disappointing losing skid when he defeated Daniel Kelly in Saturday’s UFC Fight Night 110 co-main event. Check out the reactions.

After losing a controversial decision to former UFC champ Anderson Silva at UFC 208 in February, Brunson (17-5 MMA, 8-3 UFC) rebounded with a 76-second knockout victory to snap Kelly’s (13-2 MMA, 6-2 UFC) winning streak in the FS1-televised middleweight bout at Spark Arena in Auckland, New Zealand.

Check below for the top Twitter reactions to Brunson’s victory over Kelly at UFC Fight Night 110.

* * * *

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 110, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 110 results: Derek Brunson finishes Daniel Kelly in 1st round with straight left

One left hand from Derek Brunson, and Daniel Kelly was on the mat.

A few follow-up hammerfists later, and Brunson (17-5 MMA, 8-3 UFC) had himself a quick finish, stopping Kelly (13-2 MMA, 6-2 UFC) with strikes at the 1:16 mark of Round 1.

The middleweight bout co-headlined today’s UFC Fight Night 110 event, which took place at Spark Arena in Auckland, New Zealand. It aired on FS1 following early prelims on UFC Fight Pass.

While he appeared to be in no rush to start the fight, when Brunson saw his opening he pounced quickly. After pumping the right hand jab, Brunson hammered Kelly with a straight left, spinning Kelly around as he went down.

With Kelly laid out on his belly and unresponsive, Brunson jumped in with several short hammerfists that forced referee John Sharp to intervene. And with that, Brunson ended the bout just 76 seconds after it began.

The win snaps a two-fight losing streak for Brunson, giving him his first victory since last September. Kelly’s loss brings his four-fight winning streak to an end.

Up-to-the-minute UFC Fight Night 110 results:

For more on UFC Fight Night 110, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 110 staff picks: Mark Hunt or Derrick Lewis? It's ridiculously close

brightcove.createExperiences();
Filed under: News, UFC

Lewis
vs.
Hunt
Brunson
vs.
Kelly
Hooker
vs.
Pearson
Cutelaba
vs.
da Silva
Elliott
vs.
Nguyen
Hirota
vs.
Volkanovski
MMAjunkie readers’
consensus picks
2017: 48-35
hunt2017
Hunt
(51%)
brunson2017
Brunson
(62%)
pearson2016
Pearson
(61%)

da Silva
(54%)
elliott2017
Elliott
(79%)
volkanovski2016
Volkanovski
(67%)
Matt Erickson @MMAjunkieMatt
2017: 56-27
lewis2017
Lewis
brunson2017
Brunson
pearson2016
Pearson
cutelaba2016
Cutelaba
Nguyen
Nguyen
volkanovski2016
Volkanovski
Simon Samano
@SJSamano
2017: 54-29
lewis2017
Lewis
kelly2017
Kelly
hooker2017
Hooker
cutelaba2016
Cutelaba
Nguyen
Nguyen
volkanovski2016
Volkanovski
Ben Fowlkes @BenFowlkesMMA
2017: 51-32
trophy copy 2016 Champion
hunt2017
Hunt
brunson2017
Brunson
hooker2017
Hooker
cutelaba2016
Cutelaba
elliott2017
Elliott
volkanovski2016
Volkanovski
Dann Stupp
@DannStupp
2017: 51-32
trophy copy 2015 Champion
lewis2017
Lewis
brunson2017
Brunson
hooker2017
Hooker
cutelaba2016
Cutelaba
elliott2017
Elliott
volkanovski2016
Volkanovski
Mike Bohn @MikeBohnMMA
2017: 50-33
trophy copy 2014 Champion
lewis2017
Lewis
kelly2017
Kelly
pearson2016
Pearson
cutelaba2016
Cutelaba
elliott2017
Elliott
volkanovski2016
Volkanovski
Fernanda Prates @nandaprates_
2017: 49-34
lewis2017
Lewis
kelly2017
Kelly
pearson2016
Pearson
cutelaba2016
Cutelaba
elliott2017
Elliott
volkanovski2016
Volkanovski
Steven Marrocco @MMAjunkieSteven
2017: 49-34
hunt2017
Hunt
brunson2017
Brunson
pearson2016
Pearson
cutelaba2016
Cutelaba
elliott2017
Elliott
volkanovski2016
Volkanovski
Brian Garcia
@thegoze
2017: 48-35
lewis2017
Lewis
brunson2017
Brunson
hooker2017
Hooker
cutelaba2016
Cutelaba
elliott2017
Elliott
volkanovski2016
Volkanovski
George Garcia @MMAjunkieGeorge
2017: 47-36
lewis2017
Lewis
brunson2017
Brunson
hooker2017
Hooker
cutelaba2016
Cutelaba
elliott2017
Elliott
volkanovski2016
Volkanovski
John Morgan @MMAjunkieJohn
2017: 42-41
lewis2017
Lewis
brunson2017
Brunson
hooker2017
Hooker
cutelaba2016
Cutelaba
elliott2017
Elliott
volkanovski2016
Volkanovski

(Click here to see the full grid in .jpg format.)

When it comes to Saturday’s UFC Fight Night 110 heavyweight headliner, fans are split – almost exactly down the middle.

Derrick Lewis (18-4 MMA, 9-2 UFC) is the overwhelming 8-2 choice over Mark Hunt (12-11-1 MMA, 7-5-1 UFC) in the MMAjunkie staff picks. However, among MMAjunkie readers, Hunt is a tiny 50.5 percent to 49.5 percent favorite.

UFC Fight Night 110 takes place at Spark Arena in Auckland, New Zealand, and it airs on FS1 following early prelims on UFC Fight Pass.

Also on the card and in the middleweight co-headliner, Derek Brunson (16-5 MMA, 7-3 UFC) is the 7-3 choice over a very live ‘dog in the resurgent Daniel Kelly (13-1 MMA, 6-1 UFC).

Additionally, Dan Hooker (13-7 MMA, 3-3 UFC) is a 6-4 pick over lightweight Ross Pearson (19-13 MMA, 11-10 UFC), light heavyweight Ion Cutelaba (12-3 MMA, 1-2 UFC) is a unanimous choice over Henrique da Silva (12-2 MMA, 2-2 UFC), former flyweight title challenger Tim Elliott (14-7-1 MMA, 3-5 UFC) is the 8-2 pick over Ben Nguyen (16-6 MMA, 3-1 UFC), and featherweight Alex Volkanovski (14-1 MMA, 1-0 UFC) is the 10-0 choice over Mizuto Hirota (14-1 MMA, 1-0 UFC).

In the MMAjunkie reader consensus picks, Hunt, Brunson, Pearson, da Silva, Elliott and Volkanovski are the choices.

Check out all the picks above.

And for more on UFC Fight Night 110, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie