Before Mayweather vs. McGregor was Ali vs. Inoki. Remembering 1st big combat-sports crossover event

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Gene LeBell still shakes his head when he hears how the most infamous cross-sport fight in combat sports history — at least until Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor go at it Aug. 26 — was supposedly fixed.

“I remember looking at (Muhammad) Ali’s legs,” martial arts icon LeBell, who refereed the fight and is now 84, told USA TODAY Sports via telephone Monday. “There were marks and hematomas all over them. Ali ended up in the hospital.”

Ali didn’t rake in the $100-plus million that Mayweather and McGregor will collect for their efforts when he took on Japanese wrestler Antonio Inoki in 1976, but he did secure a $6 million purse. That was then a monstrous sum, especially for a bout that the boxing star believed would be scripted with a pre-ordained outcome.

“Except that it wasn’t,” LeBell said. “People don’t believe me, but no one said anything to me about what had to happen or about a specific set of rules.”

The contest itself generated huge attention and played out before a sellout crowd at the Budokan in Tokyo. Inoki was a massive star in Japan, where pro wrestling enjoys great appeal. Ali was coming off an 11-fight win streak in boxing, with the third bout of his trilogy against Ken Norton to follow soon after.

Sadly, the Tokyo fight was a dud. Inoki spent much of the 15 rounds on his back, kicking out at Ali’s legs, which quickly welted up. Different versions of what was permitted abound, with Inoki having claimed then that many of his typical tactics such as throws and strong grappling were forbidden, leaving him little option but to stay on his back, out of range of Ali’s strikes. Ali connected with just five punches the entire fight.

The lack of activity meant the much-touted battle went down as a footnote, fading into obscurity alongside the classic boxing events of the 1970s, many of them featuring Ali.

“It was the most atrocious crap that I have ever seen,” Ali’s promoter and current Top Rank chief Bob Arum said. “Nothing happened.”

Antonio Inoki (left) and Muhammad Ali during their match on June 26, 1976 at Tokyo’s Budokan Hall. (AP)

LeBell said the entertainment void was because neither man had any fighting skills except his own. Ali couldn’t wrestle or strike except for with his fists. Inoki couldn’t box. Each stuck to what they knew best. The fight was eventually called a draw, LeBell scoring it 71-71, a boxing judge giving Inoki the win and a wrestling judge scoring it for Ali.

One man who has watched it in depth, perhaps surprisingly, is McGregor, an avid discipline of all combat sports and their history.

“I watched, but you can’t see much of the build-up. It was a different time,” McGregor said at his media workout last week. “But the fight was interesting. I believe Ali was set up and didn’t know what he was letting himself in for. Ali wasn’t calling Inoki into his game (boxing), so credit to Ali for that. That shows his character.

“It was a crazy fight. Inoki sat full guard and was crawling across the floor kicking Ali in the legs. Ali was like backing up trying to say, ‘Get him up.’ (But) you’ve got to deal with these problems yourself.”

Midway through the fight, Ali made an attempt to catch Inoki’s legs and subsequently land punches. As the most lucrative night of his life approaches, McGregor reflected how if that moment had gone differently, the event might have provided a seminal change in combat sports.

“Ali tried to reach down and punch, and he ended up getting swept and Inoki ended up on top,” McGregor added. “(But) the referee separated it straight away. If that moment in time was let go for five more seconds, 10 seconds, Inoki would have wrapped around his neck or his arm or a limb, and the whole face of the combat world would have changed right there and then.”

As it was, boxing remained king for decades to come, whereas the explosion of the UFC and mixed martial arts was still far off in the future.

While the fight wasn’t fixed, as Ali originally assumed, it could have turned out that way. Pro wrestling legend Vince McMahon Sr. contacted Arum with an incredible and hilarious script that he believed would give the bout the best possible result.

“Inoki would have a razor blade hidden and would cut himself,” Arum added. “He would be covered in blood, and Ali would have him on the ropes and would be begging the referee to stop the fight. Eventually, Ali would turn completely to the referee, then Inoki would jump on him, pin him, the referee would count 1-2-3, and Inoki would win. Then Ali would shout: ‘It’s another Pearl Harbor.’”

Perhaps thankfully, that outcome did not eventuate. Ali would go on to beat Norton, though his legs became infected from all the cuts caused by Inoki’s kicks and his movement never quite got back to its scintillating best.

Inoki became a politician, and the pair remained firm friends for the rest of Ali’s life. LeBell continued to be involved in combat sports, writing several books, worked extensively in the movie industry as a renowned stuntman, and was involved in MMA recently through his friendship with Ronda Rousey. He is looking forward to having an armchair view of Mayweather-McGregor instead of the in-ring look he had 41 years ago.

“In reality, boxers shouldn’t wrestle or fight MMA guys,” LeBell said. “MMA guys shouldn’t fight boxers. But for $100 million I’d fight a lion, and I can’t wait to see what they make of this event.”

For more on “The Money Fight: Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor,” check out the MMA Rumors section of the site.

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Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

MGM Resorts offering the only Mayweather-McGregor closed circuit viewing on Las Vegas Strip

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Going to be in Las Vegas on Aug. 26 and want to watch the biggest event in combat sports history but can’t spend an absurd amount of money to be there in person?

Closed circuit might be the next best thing.

UFC lightweight champion Conor McGregor (21-3 MMA, 9-1 UFC) and Floyd Mayweather (49-0 boxing) face off on Aug. 26 at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas in a pay-per-view event expected to be the most lucrative prize fight of all time.

Only MGM Resorts will be providing closed circuit viewing parties on the Las Vegas Strip to watch the highly anticipated boxing showdown.

They will be hosted at the following locations:

  • Bellagio – Grand Ballroom
  • MGM Grand – Marquee Ballroom, Tap Sports Bar
  • Mandalay Bay – Mandalay Bay Theatre, Light Nightclub
  • The Mirage – Love Theatre, Mirage Grand Ballroom
  • Monte Carlo – Park Theater, Diablo’s Cantina, Double Barrel
  • New York-New York – Zumanity Theater, Nine Fine Irishmen
  • Luxor – Criss Angel Theater
  • Excalibur – Tournament of Kings Arena
  • Circus Circus – Garden Grill Ballroom

Click here for more information.

And for more on “The Money Fight: Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor,” check out the MMA Rumors section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Chael Sonnen responds to Tito Ortiz's callout on Twitter just how you'd expect

UFC Hall of Famer Tito Ortiz recently provided an update this week on his post-neck surgery condition, posting an Instagram video in which he specifies details the procedure and how he’s feeling while also thanking friends, family and Bellator for their support.

Ortiz, who retired more than six months ago, closed out the video with this:

“I’m alive. I’m fixed. Now it’s time to get ready because, Chael, I’m kicking your ass.”

That obviously was Ortiz (19-12-1 MMA, 3-1 BMMA) hinting at un-retiring for a rematch with Chael Sonnen (30-15-1 MMA, 1-1 BMMA), who tapped out to a rear-naked choke in their fight earlier this year at Bellator 170. You know Sonnen wouldn’t let that go without a response, which he issued on Twitter.

That’s a classic Chael Sonnen response, ladies and gentlemen, especially the part about “I’m glad I beat you.” Because, you know, he is “still undefeated and still undisputed” no matter what any of us think.

For more on the upcoming Bellator schedule, visit the MMA Rumors section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Jon Jones recognizes Brock Lesnar could be using him for leverage in WWE contract negotiations

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UFC light heavyweight champion Jon Jones is hopeful an octagon encounter with Brock Lesnar will eventually come to fruition. However, he’s also preparing for the possibility it won’t.

Jones (23-1 MMA, 17-1 UFC), who regained the 205-pound belt with a third-round knockout of Daniel Cormier at UFC 214 last month, called out Lesnar (5-3 MMA, 4-3 UFC) following his victory, further fueling the hype for a potential matchup.

The subject of a Jones vs. Lesnar fight was first broached early in UFC 214 fight week when a fan asked “Bones” about it during a Facebook Live Q&A. Once it came up, though, he began to give it serious consideration, and from there the topic took on a life of its own.

“I had no intentions of fighting Brock Lesnar – he wasn’t on my radar,” Jones told MMAjunkie. “It’s honestly not even my style to call out people. People were asking me on Facebook Live. I didn’t expect it to go anywhere. There was only like 30 viewers logged in at the time. Little did I know Facebook Live actually records. I was just speaking freely and loosely. I got asked about Brock, and it went back to his camp, and they released a statement right away, and it kind of took off from there.”

The timing of it all is curious. Lesnar, who is typically borderline inaccessible to the media, has responded to Jones, the No. 1-ranked fighter in the latest USA TODAY Sports/MMAjunkie MMA pound-for-pound rankings, at every turn. He’s warned Jones to “be careful” what he wishes for, but whether he’s serious about another UFC comeback remains to be seen.

Lesnar has fought just once since December 2011, defeating Mark Hunt in July 2016 at UFC 200 in a result that was later overturned to a no-contest when Lesnar flunked multiple drug tests around the time of the bout. Lesnar still owes the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) more than six months of suspension time after retiring in February, which means a comeback is still far off.

Moreover, talk of Lesnar fighting for the UFC comes up on almost a yearly basis. He signs short-term contracts with WWE, and rumors of switching professions comes up each time a new negotiation period surfaces. His current deal is reportedly done after WrestleMania in April.

With that knowledge in mind, Jones knows he could simply be part of Lesnar’s ploy to maximize his next contract with WWE. However, he thinks a UFC return to fight him would be a massive financial opportunity, as well.

“I could see it being a leverage point to get paid the bigger bucks to stick around (with WWE) or come over to the UFC,” Jones said. “Either way, I think it would be great if he comes over to the UFC to get a gigantic payday, probably his biggest UFC payday. Now he has this as a leverage point from whichever direction he decides to go in. Good for Brock to have options.”

Jones said given the entire scope of the situation, he’s unlikely to fight Lesnar next. He’s still waiting on word of his next opponent but told MMAjunkie he’s open to a long-awaited rematch with Alexander Gustafsson, just not at UFC 217 in New York City.

Whatever comes in Jones’ future is going to be a significant moment as he looks to make his second UFC title reign better than the first. When it comes to big-fight opportunities, though, especially ones where he likes his chances of winning, Lesnar sits atop the mountain.

“I asked my coaches how they felt about it and everyone said, ‘You know what, Jon? That’s a very winnable fight, and it’s such a huge payday – why not?’” Jones said. “I just kept it going and have been entertaining it, and now it’s taken off. It’s something that could be in the works.”

Jones is so interested in the fight, in fact, that he may consider crashing Lesnar’s upcoming Universal Title defense at WWE SummerSlam in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Aug. 27 (via Twitter):

For more on the upcoming UFC schedule, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

MMAjunkie's 'Fight of the Month' for July: A long-awaited debut meets expectations

With another action-packed month of MMA in the books, MMAjunkie looks at the best fights from July. Here are the five nominees, listed in chronological order, and winner of MMAjunkie’s “Fight of the Month” award for July.

At the bottom of the post, let us know if we got it right by voting on your choice.

* * * *

The nominees

Justin Gaethje def. Michael Johnson at TUF 25 Finale

Justin Gaethje (18-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC) promised a big splash in his UFC debut, and the former WSOF champ delivered when he defeated lightweight contender Michael Johnson (17-12 MMA, 9-8 UFC).

Gaethje added yet another victory to his undefeated record when he beat Johnson by second-round TKO in a “Fight of the Year” contender, putting himself on the map in the loaded 155-pound weight class.

Robert Whittaker def. Yoel Romero at UFC 213

Robert Whittaker (19-4 MMA, 10-2 UFC) came into his UFC interim middleweight title fight against Yoel Romero (12-2 MMA, 8-1 UFC) with a bum left knee, but he didn’t expect it to give him any trouble.

That all changed in the first round, though, when Romero hit Whittaker with a side kick. Whittaker felt the pain that would stick with him for the remainder of the bout. It didn’t hinder him completely, and he pushed through with his game plan and seemingly came back from an 0-2 hole to win a unanimous decision.

Instagram Photo

Derek Campos def Brandon Girtz at Bellator 181

Derek Campos (19-6 MMA, 8-4 BMMA) and Brandon Girtz (14-7 MMA, 6-5 BMMA) have met three times under the Bellator banner, and their trilogy proved an instant classic.

The two lightweights came to bang in the catchweight contest. Ultimately, Campos took home a TKO at the close of the second round when doctors determined a nasty gash on Girtz’s forehead was bad enough to end the fight.

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Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos def. Lyman Good at UFC on FOX 25

Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos (17-5 MMA, 2-2 UFC) and Lyman Good (19-4 MMA, 1-1 UFC) threw down for 15 minutes, but dos Santos brought a few more weapons and a little more energy.

Although one judge dissented for Good, Brazilian vet dos Santos picked up two scorecards to take home the split-decision call in the entertaining welterweight affair.

Instagram Photo

Brian Ortega def. Renato Moicano at UFC 214

Brian Ortega (12-0 MMA, 4-0 UFC) and Renato Moicano (11-1-1 MMA, 3-1 UFC) were nearly two-and-a-half rounds into a striking war that fans at cageside could hear as well as they could see. Then Moicano made the questionable decision to take down Ortega.

It played right into Ortega’s submission strengths as Moicano inadvertently stuck his neck into a guillotine choke that Ortega squeezed for the finish, forcing the tap at the 2:59 mark of Round 3.

* * * *

The winner: Gaethje vs. Johnson

Michael Johnson and Justin Gaethje

The contempt between Gaethje and Johnson finally came to a head inside the octagon, and it was a sight to behold.

Gaethje overcame nearly being finished twice to storm back for a finish of his own, defeating Johnson via second-round TKO in one of the most memorable UFC debuts in history.

“You cannot break me,” Gaethje said. “I promise you. You better put me to sleep.”

It appeared that came close to happening on two occasions during this slugfest. Gaethje was getting the better of some spectacular exchanges for most of the first round, but Johnson connected flush with a right hook that badly wobbled the newcomer. Johnson went for the finish, and he might’ve gotten it, but the bell sounded.

Both fighters came out swinging again in the second round, and again Johnson landed a right hand that wobbled Gaethje but didn’t drop him. Although Johnson failed to finish, he settled in and found holes in Gaethje’s defense, allowing him to land the better shots.

That is, until Gaethje hit an uppercut in the final 90 seconds that discombobulated Johnson. From there, Gaethje continued to pour it on with more uppercuts, busting up Johnson’s face until a knee signaled the end when “Big” John McCarthy stepped in at the 4:42 mark.

“Where is my equal at?” he asked the crowd. “I’m 18-0 with 15 knockouts. Who is my equal? That’s who I want.”

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Filed under: Bellator, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

10 reasons to watch UFC Fight Night 114, where lighter fighters are set for Mexico City's altitude

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Filed under: News, UFC

On Saturday the UFC heads back to the rarified air of Mexico City, which sits 7,200 feet above sea level. Perhaps as a nod to that high altitude, the promotion has stacked the card with lighter-weight competitors, with the majority of the bouts taking place at bantamweight or lighter.

One of those sub-135-pound battles gets top billing. Young rising flyweight stars Brandon Moreno and Sergio Pettis headline this event. It’s a big fight for Moreno, who goes by one of the more colorful nicknames in the UFC, “The Assassin Baby.” Just three fights into his UFC career, the promotion tasks the Mexican-born competitor with headlining an event in his home country against an opponent with much more UFC experience.

In the co-main event, another young Mexican-born fighter, Alexa Grasso, looks to bounce back from her first career defeat when she meets the more tenured Randa Markos.

UFC Fight Night 114 takes place at Mexico City Arena, and it airs on FS1 following early prelims on UFC Fight Pass.

Here are 10 reasons to watch the event.

1. Closing in

In a flyweight division in need of fresh challengers, the winner of the matchup between Moreno (14-3 MMA, 3-0 UFC), currently No. 9 in the USA TODAY Sports/MMAjunkie MMA flyweight rankings, and No. 8 ranked Pettis (15-2 MMA, 6-2 UFC) could find himself one or two fights away from a title shot.

Moreno has come on like gangbusters since joining the UFC in October, going 3-0 while pocketing $100,000 with two fight-night bonus awards. The 23-year-old is exciting and charismatic, with an aggressive fighting style that will surely make him the fan favorite in his native Mexico.

Pettis, also 23, has much more octagon experience. A UFC competitor since 2013, he’s won his past three fights, all by decision. Pettis is a much more controlled and patient fighter than Moreno, and that could play a part in this contest. Neither of these two has gone five rounds, and doing so at altitude could prove taxing.

2. Looking for a star

The UFC bit hard upon signing Grasso, selling her as a future star. While she won her debut, defeating Heather Jo Clark, she dropped her second fight, to Felice Herrig. At UFC Fight Night 114, the 23-year-old Mexican fighter gets another tough test in Markos.

The 31-year-old Markos delivered one of the best performances of her career in her last outing while earning a split-decision win over former strawweight champion Carla Esparza. Markos changed up her training regime before that fight, and it paid dividends.

If Markos (7-4 MMA, 3-3 UFC) can take out Grasso (9-1 MMA, 1-1 UFC) and put together her first two-fight winning streak since 2013, she’ll be in line to face a ranked opponent.

The loss to Herrig was the first of Grasso’s career. Look to see how she bounces back from that defeat, what overall progress she has made, and how she handles the pressure of facing a fighter with more high-level experience than she has.

3. Unbeaten, but untested

Niko Price has had two short-notice UFC fights. He’s won both by stoppage, but his most recent victory was later ruled a no-contest due to a failed drug test for marijuana. At UFC Fight Night 114, fans get to see how Price fares with more than two weeks to prepare for an opponent. Price faces nine-fight UFC vet Alan Jouban at welterweight.

Unbeaten Price (10-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) has never fought someone as well-rounded as Jouban (15-5 MMA, 6-3 UFC), who’s coming off a submission loss to Gunnar Nelson in his last bout. But before that, he was on a three-fight winning streak that included a decision win over Mike Perry. That Perry fight showed Jouban could stay with a smart game plan against an aggressive and maybe a little reckless opponent – adjectives that could also describe Price.

4. That’s a lot of stoppages

Martin Bravo hasn’t fought since he won Season 3 of “The Ultimate Fighter: Latin America” in November by knocking out Claudio Puelles. He meets UFC newcomer Humberto Bandenay at featherweight.

The 23-year-old Bravo is unbeaten as a pro, but he remains a developing prospect. He’s comfortable and aggressive wherever the fight may go, and he’s won five fights by submission and four via TKO.

Bravo faces 22-year-old Bandenay (13-4 MMA, 0-0 UFC), who despite being younger than Bravo (11-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC), has six more fights to his name. Bandenay is on a five-fight winning streak, and he’s won each of those bouts by stoppage, including his most recent outing: a May submission of Salim Mukhidinov at KOTC.

5. Give it a second shot

Former UFC light heavyweight champion Rashad Evans enters his fight against Sam Alvey on a three-fight losing skid, the longest of his career. Evans made his middleweight debut in his last outing and dropped a split decision to Daniel Kelly. That loss came after a layoff of nearly a year. Now that he’s blown off the ring rust and has a feel for middleweight, don’t be surprised to see a much more active Evans (19-6-1 MMA, 14-6-1 UFC) against Alvey (30-9 MMA, 7-4 UFC).

Alvey saw his four-fight winning streak come to an end in his last fight, an April unanimous-decision defeat to Thales Leites.

6. Looking to shine

With a Cage Warriors belt on his resume and an eight-fight winning streak to his name, Jack Hermansson defeated Scott Askham in his UFC debut. Hermansson followed that victory with a submission loss to Cezar Ferreira. In his third UFC bout, Hermansson earned a first-round knockout win over Alex Nicholson.

Hermansson (15-3 MMA, 2-1 UFC) gets a chance to capitalize on that May KO win when he meets Brad Scott (11-4 MMA, 3-3 UFC), who’s alternated wins and losses throughout his six-fight UFC run. He most recently defeated Askham via split decision in March.

Both of these middleweights like to stay busy on the feet, so this could prove to be a fun scrap between two fighters looking to increase their name recognition in an increasingly crowded roster.

7. Stay off the ground

Three fights into his UFC career, and Team Alpha Male fighter Hector Sandoval looks like he could make a charge up the flyweight ranks. He’ll get a chance to do just that against No. 13-ranked Dustin Ortiz.

Sandoval has displayed quickness and good striking in the clinch, and he can take his opponent to the mat if he runs into issues on the feet. He packed all of those talents into his last fight, a first-round TKO win over Matt Schnell.

Ortiz (16-7 MMA, 5-5 UFC) is best known for his wrestling base, but he could have problems when it comes to Sandoval (14-3 MMA, 1-2 UFC), who has a 71 percent takedown defense. If Ortiz does get this fight to the ground, expect him to keep it there since he has some of the best top control in the division.

Ortiz has gone 2-4 in his past six fights, including his first career submission loss in his last outing when Moreno stopped him.

8. That has to sting a bit

In July 2015, unranked bantamweights Henry Briones and Cody Garbrandt met at UFC 189. Garbrandt won that contest by unanimous decision. Four fights and 17 months later, Garbrandt claimed the bantamweight title, defeating Dominick Cruz. Briones was inactive during most of Garbrandt’s run, competing once when he lost to Douglas Silva de Andrade by third-round TKO in November.

Briones (16-6-1 MMA, 1-2 UFC) faces longtime WEC/UFC competitor Rani Yahya (23-9 MMA, 8-3 UFC) in his return bout. Briones is best known as a brawler while Yahya, who enters this fight coming off a decision defeat to Joe Soto, has been trying to shed his reputation as a ground-control fighter by opening up his striking, something he did in his loss to Soto.

This could be a sleeper pick for slugfest of the night.

9. Fresh and unbeaten

Two unbeaten flyweights, Joseph Morales (8-0 MMA, 0-0 UFC) and Roberto Sanchez (7-0 MMA, 0-0 UFC), close out the UFC Fight Pass prelims.

If you recall, Morales is the fighter Cynthia Calvillo implored UFC President Dana White to sign after her UFC 209 win. White did that after Morales knocked out former Cage Fury and Ring of Combat flyweight champion Sean Santella in March at Cage Fury 64. The victory gave the 22-year-old Team Alpha Male product six stoppages in eight fights.

Sanchez enters the UFC after winning the LFA flyweight title at LFA 14. The 31-year-old Sanchez took out Jerome Rivera that night, submitting him in the third round. The victory was Sanchez’s fifth consecutive submission victory.

10. Trying to stick

After spending time with RFA, WSOF, Legacy FC and a stint in “The Ultimate Fighter” house, Jordan Rinaldi got his opportunity to step up to the big show in May 2016, when he took on Abel Trujillo in a short-notice bout. Rinaldi represented himself well through the first two rounds, but he faded in the third, and that allowed Trujillo to touch him up in the striking department and earn the decision victory, bringing an end to Rinaldi’s five-fight winning streak.

At UFC Fight Night 114, Rinaldi matches up against a fighter who is more in line with his experience level, Alvaro Herrera, who is coming in off a submission loss to Vicente Luque in July 2016.

This lightweight fight might give Rinaldi (12-5 MMA, 0-1 UFC) the opportunity to show off his ground chops as Herrera (9-4 MMA, 1-1 UFC), a striker, is not known for his takedown defense.

For more on UFC Fight Night 114, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Overhead raw footage of dazed Daniel Cormier after UFC 214 knockout is painful to watch

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One of the unique features to the UFC’s Fight Pass streaming service is the ability to view what’s going on inside the octagon from numerous angles. But as has been seen several times in recent years, it’s not always pretty.

Following Daniel Cormier’s knockout loss to Jon Jones (23-1 MMA, 17-1 UFC) in Saturday’s UFC 214 headliner, an overhead octagon cameras locked in on the now-former UFC light heavyweight champion.

On the live pay-per-view broadcast it was evident Cormier (19-2 MMA, 8-2 UFC) was having trouble regaining his wits after the stoppage. That fact became undeniable when UFC commentator Joe Rogan interviewed a concussed “D.C.,” which he later apologized for doing without order.

For more than 2 minutes Cormier is seen stumbling around the octagon as medical personnel, California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) representatives, referee “Big” John McCarthy, and even UFC President Dana White attempt to help calm and assist the 38-year-old (via Reddit).

This isn’t the first time some painful footage has come out following a fighter’s crushing defeat.

Former UFC welterweight title challenger Rory MacDonald was caught collapsing to the canvas following his “Fight of the Year” war with Robbie Lawler at UFC 189 in July 2015. Another example from December 2015 saw footage released of a devastated former featherweight king Jose Aldo after his 13-second knockout to Conor McGregor at UFC 194.

Outside of his brief in-octagon interview with Rogan, Cormier has not spoken or released a statement since UFC 214. The footage, however, speaks volumes.

For complete coverage of UFC 214, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid4621179066001?bckey=AQ~~,AAAABvaL8JE~,ufBHq_I6FnxR-PQW_F3sm5QdUbP7D6E9&bctid=5525891367001
Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Brock Lesnar warns Jon Jones in response to UFC 214 callout

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Heading into UFC 214, Jon Jones said he would “deal with Brock Lesnar” after dealing with Daniel Cormier at UFC 214.

Well, Jones dealt with Cormier by scoring a third-round knockout win over his rival to reclaim the light heavyweight title Saturday night. Then as promised, Jones began the process of dealing with Lesnar by issuing a formal challenge.

“Brock Lesnar, if you want to know what it feels like to get your ass kicked by a guy that weighs 40 pounds less than you, come meet me in the octagon,” Jones said into the microphone during octagon interview.

Lesnar heard that and had a simple, direct response to The Associated Press.

“Be careful what you wish for, young man,” Lesnar said

As awesome as it sounds, there are reasons the dream fight wouldn’t happen any time soon.

Lesnar, who retired earlier this year, is still subject to punishment for an anti-doping violation one year ago at UFC 200. Six months remain on Lesnar’s one-year suspension, which was frozen by his retirement.

But still, a potential fight between Jones and Lesnar would rank among the biggest in UFC history. Given the era of superfights we’re currently in, one would think efforts will be made to book this if it’s at all possible.

It’s what the champ wants.

For complete coverage of UFC 214, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid4621179066001?bckey=AQ~~,AAAABvaL8JE~,ufBHq_I6FnxR-PQW_F3sm5QdUbP7D6E9&bctid=5525891367001
Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC 214 play-by-play and live results (6:30 p.m. ET)

http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid4621179066001?bckey=AQ~~,AAAABvaL8JE~,ufBHq_I6FnxR-PQW_F3sm5QdUbP7D6E9&bctid=5525292976001
Filed under: Featured, News, UFC

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ANAHEIM, Calif. – MMAjunkie is on scene and reporting live from today’s UFC 214 event, and you can join us for live play-by-play and official results beginning at 6:30 p.m. ET (3:30 p.m. PT).

The event takes place at Honda Center in Anaheim, Calif. It airs on pay-per-view following prelims on FXX and UFC Fight Pass. In the headliner, Daniel Cormier defends his light heavyweight title against former champ Jon Jones in a rematch. In the co-feature, Tyron Woodley defends his welterweight belt against Demian Maia. And in a third title fight, the vacant women’s featherweight title is on the line between Tonya Evinger and Cristiane Justino.

Follow along with our round-by-round updates and official results beginning at approximately 6:30 p.m. ET for the UFC Fight Pass prelims, 8 p.m. ET for the FXX prelims, and 10 p.m. ET for the pay-per-view main card.

To discuss the show, be sure to check out our UFC 214 discussion thread. You can also get behind-the-scenes coverage and other event notes from on-site reporters John Morgan (@MMAjunkieJohn), Dann Stupp (@DannStupp), Mike Bohn (@MikeBohnMMA) and Ben Fowlkes (@benfowlkesmma) on Twitter.

Enjoy the fights, everyone.

* * * *

Josh Burkman vs. Drew Dober

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Josh Burkman (28-15 MMA, 6-10 UFC), Drew Dober (17-8 MMA, 3-4 UFC)
Division: Lightweight
Broadcast: UFC Fight Pass
Referee:
Judging:

Eric Shelton vs. Jarred Brooks

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Jarred Brooks (12-0 MMA, 0-0 UFC), Eric Shelton (10-3 MMA, 0-1 UFC)
Division: Flyweight
Broadcast: UFC Fight Pass
Referee:
Judging:

Kailin Curran vs. Alexandra Albu

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Alexandra Albu (2-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC), Kailin Curran (4-4 MMA, 1-4 UFC)
Division: Women’s strawweight
Broadcast: UFC Fight Pass
Referee:
Judging:

Andre Fili vs. Calvin Kattar

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Andre Fili (16-4 MMA, 4-3 UFC), Calvin Kattar (16-2 MMA, 0-0 UFC)
Division: Featherweight
Broadcast: FXX
Referee:
Judging:

Renato Moicano vs. Brian Ortega

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Renato Moicano (11-0-1 MMA, 3-0 UFC), Brian Ortega (11-0 MMA, 3-0 UFC)
Division: Featherweight
Broadcast: FXX
Referee:
Judging:

Aljamain Sterling vs. Renan Barao

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Renan Barao (34-4-1 MMA, 9-3 UFC) vs. Aljamain Sterling (13-2 MMA, 5-2 UFC)
Division: 140-pound catchweight
Rankings: Sterling No. 11 bantamweight
Broadcast: FXX
Referee:
Judging:

Ricardo Lamas vs. Jason Knight

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Jason Knight (17-2 MMA, 4-1 UFC) vs. Ricardo Lamas (17-5 MMA, 8-3 UFC)
Division: Featherweight
Rankings: Lamas No. 5, Knight honorable mention
Broadcast: FXX
Referee:
Judging:

Jimi Manuwa vs. Volkan Oezdemir

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Jimi Manuwa (17-2 MMA, 6-2 UFC), Volkan Oezdemir (14-1 MMA, 2-0 UFC)
Division: Light heavyweight
Rankings: Manuwa No. 7, Oezdemir No. 8
Broadcast: Pay-per-view
Referee:
Judging:

Robbie Lawler vs. Donald Cerrone

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Donald Cerrone (32-7 MMA, 19-4 UFC), Robbie Lawler (27-11 MMA, 12-5 UFC)
Division: Welterweight
Rankings: Lawler No. 3, Cerrone No. 11
Broadcast: Pay-per-view
Referee:
Judging:

Cristiane Justino vs. Tonya Evinger

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Tonya Evinger (19-5 MMA, 0-0 UFC), Cristiane Justino (17-1 MMA, 2-0 UFC)
Division: Women’s featherweight
Broadcast: Pay-per-view
Referee:
Judging:

Tyron Woodley vs. Demian Maia

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Tyron Woodley (17-3-1 MMA, 7-2-1 UFC), Demian Maia (25-6 MMA, 19-6 UFC)
Division: Welterweight
Rankings: Woodley No. 1, No. 10 pound-for-pound; Maia No. 5
Broadcast: Pay-per-view
Referee:
Judging:

Daniel Cormier vs. Jon Jones

Round 1 –

Result:
Recap:
Photos:
Records: Daniel Cormier (19-1 MMA, 8-1 UFC), Jon Jones (22-1 MMA, 16-1 UFC)
Division: Light heavyweight
Rankings: Jones No. 1, No. 3 pound-for-pound; Cormier No. 2, No. 2 pound-for-pound
Broadcast: Pay-per-view
Referee:
Judging:

Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC 214 discussion thread

http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid4621179066001?bckey=AQ~~,AAAABvaL8JE~,ufBHq_I6FnxR-PQW_F3sm5QdUbP7D6E9&bctid=5525292976001
Filed under: News, UFC

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ANAHEIM, Calif. – MMAjunkie is on scene and reporting live from today’s UFC 214 event at Honda Center in Anaheim, Calif., which kicks off at 6:30 p.m. ET (3:30 p.m. PT). You can discuss the event here.

Be sure to follow along with the latest card updates in our UFC 214 live results post, and then discuss the event in the comments section below.

Round-by-round updates and official results begin at approximately 6:30 p.m. ET for the preliminary card and 10 p.m. ET for the main card.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie