UFC Fight Night 120 lineup finalized, and the Norfolk fight card isn't too shabby

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The lineup is set for the UFC’s upcoming return to Old Dominion.

UFC Fight Night 120, the UFC’s first event in Virginia since UFC Fight Night 63 in 2015, takes place at Ted Constant Convocation Center in Norfolk, Va., and it airs on FS1 following early prelims on UFC Fight Pass.

The main event features two 155-pound notables. Former lightweight champion Anthony Pettis (20-6 MMA, 7-5 UFC) got his wish following a recent callout of fellow contender Dustin Poirier (21-5 MMA, 13-4 UFC).

Pettis, who’s No. 11 in the MMA lightweight rankings, recently earned a unanimous-decision victory over Jim Miller to improve to 2-1 since a disastrous three-fight skid in 2016. He meets Poirier, a perennial contender who’s ranked No. 13. Poirier was on a stellar 5-1 run before a recent bout with ex-titleholder Eddie Alvarez ended in a no-contest due to illegal knees from Alvarez.

In the co-main event, two longtime UFC fighters and tough-as-nails vets meet when welterweight Matt Brown (20-16 MMA, 13-10 UFC) takes on fellow fan favorite Diego Sanchez (27-10 MMA, 16-10 UFC). Brown plans to retire after the fight.

Rounding out the main card are former heavyweight champion Andrei Arlovski (25-15 MMA, 14-9 UFC) vs. Junior Albini (14-2 MMA, 1-0 UFC), former middleweight title challenger Nate Marquardt (35-18-2 MMA, 13-11 UFC) vs. Cezar Ferreira (11-6 MMA, 7-4 UFC), No. 4-ranked bantamweight Raphael Assuncao (25-5 MMA, 9-2 UFC) vs. Matthew Lopez (10-1 MMA, 2-1 UFC), and veteran lightweights Joe Lauzon (27-13 MMA, 14-10 UFC) vs. Clay Guida (33-17 MMA, 13-11 UFC).

In the featured prelim, former flyweight title challenger and No. 15-ranked bantamweight John Dodson (19-8 MMA, 8-3 UFC) takes on former WSOF champion and No. 7-ranked Marlon Moraes (18-5-1 MMA, 0-1 UFC).

Other notables are part of the prelims, including Sage Northcutt, Angela Hill and Court McGee.

The full UFC Fight Night 120 card includes:

MAIN CARD (FS1, 10 p.m. ET)

  • Anthony Pettis vs. Dustin Poirier
  • Matt Brown vs. Diego Sanchez
  • Junior Albini vs. Andrei Arlovski
  • Cezar Ferreira vs. Nate Marquardt
  • Raphael Assuncao vs. Matthew Lopez
  • Clay Guida vs. Joe Lauzon

PRELIMINARY CARD (FS1, 8 p.m. ET)

PRELIMINARY CARD (UFC Fight Pass, 6:30 p.m. ET)

For more on UFC Fight Night 120, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Twitter Mailbag: Is Jon Jones now the biggest screw-up in MMA history?

Who’s the biggest screw-up in MMA history? Who was really being represented when an MMA fighter took on a boxer? And now that the circus is over, what actual MMA fight are we most looking forward to in the month ahead?

All that and more in this week’s Twitter Mailbag. To ask a question of your own, tweet to @BenFowlkesMMA.

* * * *

First of all, let’s examine what we mean by “(expletive) up,” and what it would really take to claim the top spot in a sport that has produced multiple felons, some of whom will likely spend the rest of their lives in prison.

Does committing horrible crimes against others make you a (expletive) up? Because if so, War Machine is definitely a frontrunner for the all-time title. Are we looking at the sheer scale of your (expletive) up? Because if that’s the case, how about Lee Murray being the alleged mastermind behind the biggest cash heist in history? Are we going for sheer dirtbag points? Then you have to at least mention former UFC heavyweight champ and vet Ricco Rodriguez and his “Celebrity Rehab” story about dragging what he thought was his girlfriend’s dead body into the driver’s seat of a car he wrecked, all to avoid punishment.

But I suspect that what Joe Rogan was talking about was the fighter who had done the most to squander immense talent with unforced errors outside the cage. And since Jon Jones has arguably the most talent to begin with, and since he may have just ruled himself ineligible for up to four years, yeah, it’s hard to argue with Rogan’s characterization.

As far as who comes in second by that metric, I’m tempted to say it’s Drew Fickett, whose list of (expletive) ups is pretty extensive. Everyone who ever trained with or fought him talks about him like his raw talent was almost limitless, but he did his best to sabotage almost every big opportunity he ever got. He went to jail instead of going on “The Ultimate Fighter.” He showed up to fight drunk. He got himself kicked out of the UFC on a win.

Did he have as much talent to squander as Jones does? Maybe not. But the thing that gets him on this list is that we never really got a chance to find out.

A little bit of all three, but in different amounts. The main entity that Conor McGregor represented in the ring this past Saturday night was himself. It was his personal brand on the line more than any other, and he represented it surprisingly well, considering the circumstances and the expectations.

He lost, but didn’t get embarrassed. He took it well and showed off the charisma that’s helped make him a star. If you showed up to watch this without any idea who he was or why he was famous, you probably went away feeling like you understood the appeal, at least a little.

But whether or not he wanted to, he was also representing the sport and the UFC. If he’d proven to be a feeble boxer, plenty of people would have used that to disparage the striking skills of all MMA fighters. If he’d gone and got himself disqualified with too many hammerfists to the back of the head, stories the next day would have focused on what thugs these UFC fighters were.

Instead, McGregor managed to put up a decent fight in someone else’s world. And it’s not like there are too many top boxers aching to try the same thing in reverse right now.

“Intriguing” is a very nice way of putting it. One week after a boxing mega fight that may or may not have shattered pay-per-view records, the UFC returns with Stefan Struve vs. Alexander Volkov in a fight that features nearly 14 combined feet of humanity competing for unclear stakes.

Is this a contender fight? Not really. Is it the setup to a contender fight? Maybe, if some of the guys higher up the list aren’t available. Will the current champ even care enough to fire up his UFC Fight Pass and watch it? Possibly, assuming he’s not fighting fires that day.

Basically the only reason it’s a main event is because the event is in Rotterdam and Struve is a local. Beyond that, and the sheer tonnage of humanity that will occupy the same cage at the same time, I can’t say there’s anything special going on here.

You’re joking, but you’re also not wrong. Right about the time I saw a boxer make his entrance while cosplaying as Grimace, I was reminded of all the weirdness that’s possible when you’re not hemmed in by Reebok fight kits. It made me miss the old days when Akihiro Gono could dress his cornermen up in evening gowns and Rich Franklin could show up looking like a damn ice cream cone.

Plus, I think we can agree that McGregor’s decision to have his cornermen all look like old-timey barbers ready to whip out the hot towels and straight razors was undeniably awesome. How are they supposed to go back to the Reebok jumpsuits after that? How are any of us?

Honestly? You probably could have convinced me that Clay Guida and Joe Lauzon did fight each other five years ago.

For all we know, it might be Joanna Jedrzejczyk herself who moves up and takes that women’s 125-pound belt from the eventual “TUF 26” winner. The thing that makes it hard to predict the future of that division is the fact that it was created so long after the two on either side of it. You had women fighting up or down a weight class from where they might be best suited, all because it was the only way to get into the UFC. Now this door is being opened, and it’s tough to say who’ll walk through it.

If I had to pick an early favorite, however, it’d probably be Barb Honchak, who held the 125-pound title in Invicta FC until an extended absence. If she can come back as good as she left, she’ll be tough to beat.

There are definitely more meaningful fights on the schedule, but man, Mike Perry vs. Thiago Alves at UFC Fight Night 116 has violence written all over it. Should be a fitting appetizer for the UFC debut of Gokhan Saki the following weekend.

It’s still too early to make too many sweeping assessments of WME-IMG’s purchase and whether it got in at the right time or price. Remember, it’s only been a little over a year since the sale. So far, we can’t say we’ve seen too many changes instituted by WME, apart from all the layoffs and the elimination of those cushy do-nothing jobs for retired star fighters.

The lack of pay-per-view draws ought to be somewhat concerning, but that well has a way of replenishing itself when given the right opportunity and environment. I’d be more worried about the potential legal and regulatory issues on the horizon. The UFC is only a few key lawsuits and/or legislative changes away from having its whole business model upended. Then there’s no telling what comes next.

I’m still unclear on what it would mean for McGregor to co-promote a UFC fight. Giving him equity in the company, sure, that’s simple enough, especially now that ownership shares are spread all over the place.

Putting his name on the canvas, as he did with the Mayweather fight? That seems like a play to his ego, especially because the company being promoted there – McGregor Sports and Entertainment – doesn’t actually appear to be doing anything else right now, at least as far as we can tell.

But playing to his ego, one way or another, is probably going to have to be part of the UFC’s attempt to lure him back. He needs to feel like he is taking a step forward rather than back, like he’s returning as a conqueror rather than just another wage-earner in the lesser-paying of the two major combat sports. And there’s only so much money the UFC can pay him and still turn a profit.

You’re preaching to the choir there, Molly. I guess it must be the same reason you can clinch and it’s an automatic sign that the ref needs to get involved. Compared to MMA, boxing is the sport that stops the fight right when it’s about to enter an interesting new phase. Let it give us an appreciation of what we have, even when it gets weird.

If I were going to pick the next MMA fighter to make a big, immediate splash in boxing, would I pick Jose Aldo – the guy known for his kicks and his somewhat flat personality? No, I can’t say that I would.

Ben Fowlkes is MMAjunkie and USA TODAY’s MMA columnist. Follow him on Twitter at @BenFowlkesMMA. Twitter Mailbag appears every Thursday on MMAjunkie.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Write the bonus check now: Joe Lauzon meets Clay Guida at UFC Fight Night 120

A lightweight showdown between a pair of veterans with 24 UFC bonuses between them … yes, 24 … has been queued up for the promotion’s return to Virginia this fall.

Joe Lauzon (27-13 MMA, 14-10 UFC), who has 15 fight-night bonuses on his resume, and Clay Guida (33-17 MMA, 13-11 UFC), who has nine, will meet at UFC Fight Night 120 in November. UFC officials announced the new booking today.

UFC Fight Night 120 takes place Nov. 11 at Ted Constant Convocation Center in Norfolk, Va. The event airs on FS1 following early prelims on UFC Fight Pass.

Lauzon has been up and down for his past eight fights. After a TKO win over Michael Chiesa, he was stopped by Al Iaquinta with a second-round TKO at UFC 183. But he bounced back in July 2015 in Chicago with a TKO of Takanori Gomi. It was back to the loss column later that year with a decision setback to Evan Dunham, though.

But at UFC 200 this past July, he rebounded by koncking out Diego Sanchez for a bonus at UFC 200. His follow-up was a “Fight of the Night” winner, but a decision loss to fellow veteran Jim Miller.

In January at UFC Fight Night 104, he took a split decision from Marcin Held – a win he even admitted he didn’t deserve. But the MMA judging gods appeared to pay him back in April when he lost a majority decision to Stevie Ray in Nashville.

WIth the addition, the latest UFC Fight Night 120 card now includes:

  • Anthony Pettis vs. Dustin Poirier
  • Matt Brown vs. Diego Sanchez
  • Nina Ansaroff vs. Angela Hill
  • Cezar Ferreira vs. Nate Marquardt
  • Karl Roberson vs. Darren Stewart
  • Jake Collier vs. Marcel Fortuna
  • Junior Albini vs. Andrei Arlovski
  • Court McGee vs. Sean Strickland
  • Clay Guida vs. Joe Lauzon

For more on UFC Fight Night 120, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 112 salaries: B.J. Penn earns highest purse despite tough loss

B.J. Penn took a loss at UFC Fight Night 112, but he earned the most money of any fighter on the card.

Penn (16-12-2 MMA, 12-11-2 UFC) earned $150,000 for his majority-decision defeat to Dennis Siever this past Sunday. Penn knocked down Siever (23-11 MMA, 12-8 UFC) in the second round and had a chance to come away with the win then and there. It was a close fight that, had it gone the other way, would’ve resulted in another $150,000 for Penn. Siever, fighting for the first time in two years, took home $39,000 for showing and earned another $39,000 for the win.

MMAjunkie today obtained the disclosed payouts from the Oklahoma State Athletic Commission, which oversaw UFC Fight Night 112 on Sunday at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Okla, which aired on FS1 following prelims on FS2 and UFC Fight Pass.

In the main event, Kevin Lee took home $44,000 for showing and another $44,000 for the win over Michael Chiesa. As previously reported, the submission victory also earned Lee (16-2 MMA, 9-2 UFC) a $50,000 “Performance of the Night” bonus, bringing his total earnings to $138,000. Chiesa (14-3 MMA, 7-3 UFC) earned $36,000 for the fight and lost out on another possible $36,000 thanks to the controversial finish.

Elsewhere on the main card, former champion Johny Hendricks earned $100,000 for showing and stood to earn another $100,000 for the win, which didn’t happen as Tom Boetsch finished him in the first round. Boetch earned $67,000 to show, $67,000 to win and also received a $50,000 “Performance of the Night” bonus.

Felice Herrig earned $25,000 for showing and another $25,000 winning. Her opponent, Justine Kish, took home $14,000 for showing.

For his UFC debut, Dominick Reyes earned $12,000 for showing and $12,000 for his impressive victory in addition to his $50,000 “Performance of the Night” bonus.

The total disclosed payout for UFC Fight Night 112 was $1,225,000.

The full list of UFC Fight Night 112 salaries included:

Kevin Lee: $88,000 (includes $44,000 win bonus)
def. Michael Chiesa $36,000

Tom Boetsch: $134,000 (includes $67,000 win bonus)
def. Johny Hendricks $100,000

Felice Herrig: $50,000 (includes $25,000 win bonus)
def. Justine Kish $14,000

Dominick Reyes: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Joachim Christensen $16,000

Tim Means: $78,000 (includes $39,000 win bonus)
def. Alex Garcia $31,000

Dennis Siever: $78,000 (includes $39,000 win bonus)
def. B.J. Penn: $150,000

Clay Guida: $110,000 (includes $55,000 win bonus)
def. Erik Koch: $24,000

Marvin Vettori: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Vitor Miranda: $18,000

Carla Esparza: $66,000 (includes $33,000 win bonus)
def. Maryna Moroz: $23,000

Darrell Horcher: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Devin Powell: $10,000

Jared Gordon: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Michel Quinones: $10,000

Tony Martin: $38,000 (includes $19,000 win bonus)
def. Johnny Case: $23,000

Jeremy Kimball: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Josh Stansbury: $12,000

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

At 35, Clay Guida feels as strong as ever – but 'I don't want to be doing this when I'm 40'

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Filed under: Featured Videos, News, UFC, Videos

OKLAHOMA CITY – Clay Guida knows he’s not going to be around forever, but he’s still got some fight left in him.

Guida (33-17 MMA, 13-11 UFC) got himself back in the win column in assertive fashion at this past Sunday’s UFC Fight Night 112, dominating Erik Koch (14-5 MMA, 4-4 UFC) on the mat in route to a clear-cut unanimous call. The solid display, over an opponent seven years his junior, was made all the more impressive by the fact that it was also the 50th pro MMA bout in Guida’s 14-year-long career.

Still, it came after back-to-back losses, on top of an overall inconsistent UFC run. Throughout the ups and downs, no one would fault the 35-year-old Guida if thoughts of getting off the rollercoaster were starting to cross his mind.

But, as it turns out, they’re not.

“As long as I’m having fun and I feel like I’m improving, there’s always going to be those bumps in the road,” Guida told reporters after the FS2-televised lightweight scrap at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Okla. “I never look at it as ‘It’s a young man’s game,’ because I’m still young. I’m in my mid-30’s. The scientists do studies, they say the male is in their peak at in the mid-30’s still.

“I feel like I’m at a very strong class, very competitive. But I feel as strong as I ever have. And I’m improving with the coaching staff at Team Alpha Male and we’re getting better every day out there.”

The scrap also meant Guida’s return to the lightweight division, after a 3-4 featherweight run. Guida celebrated the fact that he basically woke up within the 155-pound limit in the morning of Saturday’s weigh-ins. But, more than simply feeling good, it’s also about results.

And, after getting his first win since a 2015 UFC Fight Night 63 decision over Robbie Peralta, they seem to speak for themselves.

“I think the 145 thing was maybe a pride thing for me,” Guida said. “Just to say ‘I know I can make it, I know I can stay there and be competitive.’ I beat some good guys, I lost to some good guys. For me, it was kind of a wrestlers’ thing. ‘I can make the weight, I’m stubborn, I wrestled at 149 in college, I can make 145 and be tough there.’ But being tough isn’t always the right recipe. Winning is the right recipe.”

Guida clearly feels good and motivated for the time being. And he has active MMA icons like Fedor Emelianenko – who, at 40, just saw a five-fight winning streak snapped with a Bellator NYC loss to Matt Mitrione – as examples of cage longevity.

But, at the same time, he doesn’t necessarily see himself going as far as some of his idols.

“I don’t want to be doing this when I’m 40,” Guida said. “I love Fedor for being the man that he is, and I feel like the dude sits in the locker room, plays cards in his jeans with his feet up, eats a 12-pack of donuts and they say, ‘Alright Fedor, you’re on.’ He just jumps up, goes out and fights, and that’s just awesome. He’s a master.

“(But) that’s not for everybody. I don’t want to be fighting when I’m 40. I want to be coaching and helping coach wrestling and things like that. And watching all this stables of fighters we have improve.”

To hear more from Guida, check out the video above.

And for complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC-Oklahoma City's 10 memorable moments, with controversy and comebacks, good and bad

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Filed under: Featured, News, UFC

The main event of Sunday’s UFC Fight Night 112 fight card was supposed to set up the victor for a matchup against a top contender in the lightweight division. That could still happen – after all, Kevin Lee did earn a first-round submission win over Michael Chiesa, but the level of controversy surrounding the stoppage, and more precisely the man who made the call, referee Mario Yamasaki, might prevent Lee from getting that immediate jump up in competition.

The co-main event had no such drama. In that bout, Tim Boetsch put Johny Hendricks away with a head kick and punches, earning himself a TKO victory early in the second round.

UFC Fight Night 112 took place at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Okla.

Here are 10 memorable moments from the event.

1. You got yourself a situation there, UFC

Before his bout against Chiesa, Lee claimed he was the better fighter in every respect. Controversial stoppage aside, Lee backed up those words at UFC Fight Night 112. Chiesa had opportunities early, missing a takedown and briefly working for a couple of submissions. However, Chiesa failed to stick any of his offense, and when Chiesa (14-3 MMA, 7-3 UFC) gave up his back, Lee (16-2 MMA, 9-2 UFC) took control, securing a body lock and a rear-naked choke.

Lee appeared to have the choke in deep, and as the clock ticked down, Yamasaki waved off the fight at the 4:37 mark of Round 1. The problem with that was Chiesa had not tapped nor lost consciousness, and Chiesa immediately protested the stoppage.

It was a messy ending to an important lightweight bout. While Lee, an honorable mention in the USA TODAY Sports/MMAjunkie MMA lightweight rankings before the fight, did get the win, the UFC has some thinking to do about what’s next for him and Chiesa, who was ranked No. 9 before his controversial defeat.

2. Everybody’s talkin’

Chiesa didn’t have much to say regarding Yamasaki during his time on the mic with UFC commentator Jon Anik, but during his backstage chat with the media, Chiesa was less reserved.

“This is the main event – that is JV bull(expletive),” Chiesa said. “That guy (Yamasaki) is too focused on being some kind of playboy in front of the cameras, making his little heart logos. Maybe he should go back and read the (expletive) rule book.”

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UFC President Dana White also got involved, taking to Instagram to let his feelings be known.

Instagram Photo

For his part, Lee didn’t see the issue.

“Mario’s a very experienced ref,” Lee said. “Mario saw it and stopped the fight. If he wouldn’t have, there was still 45 seconds left in the fight. I don’t see what the controversy is about. It wasn’t like I was going to let go.”

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Chiesa, Lee and White weren’t the only ones offering opinions on the stoppage, social media was alive with opinions following the bout.

3. Something has to change

If Hendricks plans to succeed at middleweight, he’s going to need to add to his arsenal – and make weight. After coming in two pounds heavy, the former welterweight champion was largely ineffective against Boetsch (21-11 MMA, 12-10 UFC). “The Barbarian” used kicks to prevent Hendricks (18-7 MMA, 13-7 UFC) from setting up and landing his patented overhand left.

Not only did those kicks stop Hendricks from establishing his offense, but they also ended the fight. Early in Round 2, Boetsch stunned Hendricks with a head kick and then swarmed, finishing him with punches against the cage.

The “Performance of the Night”-winning stoppage earned Boetsch his third TKO win in his last four outings. As for Hendricks, not only has he missed weight three times in his last four fights, but he is 1-3 in those contests and 3-6 dating back to November 2013.

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4. Speaking up

Felice Herrig is on the best run of her UFC career. Her unanimous decision win over Justine Kish was her third straight victory and second straight win over a formerly undefeated opponent. Despite her winning streak, Herrig is feeling under-appreciated.

“Honestly, if you want to know the truth, I just feel like I’m not young and beautiful for the UFC to want to promote me,” she said. “It’s sad because I’ve really worked hard to be here. It’s hard to see these people who’ve not been through what I’ve been through and just got to the UFC at the right time, and they’re now getting all these opportunities.

“I’ve seen how hard I’ve worked to get here, and it just doesn’t matter because I just feel I’m not pretty enough, and I’m not getting any younger.”

After her last win, Herrig (13-6 MMA, 4-1 UFC) called for a fight against either Michelle Waterson or Paige VanZant. She didn’t call out another fighter after defeating Kish (6-1 MMA, 2-1 UFC), but based on her winning streak, Herrig should get a top 15 strawweight opponent in her next outing.

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5. Remember, a sense of humor is important

Kish was close to being choked out by Herrig in the third round, but Kish fought through the choke, using muscle and force of will more than technique to break free from the submission hold. However, Kish paid a price for her efforts, something she acknowledged on social media following the fight.

6. A good June

Dominick Reyes has had a good month. On June 2, fighting for LFA, he delivered a highlight-reel knockout which earned him a short notice call up from the UFC. In his debut with the promotion, Reyes (7-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC) wrapped things up quickly, blasting Joachim Christensen with a straight left that put Christensen (14-6 MMA, 1-3 UFC) on the mat, forcing the referee to wave off the fight 29 seconds into the first round.

Reyes absorbed just one strike during the light heavyweight fight while landing 13 of the 16 he threw.

As debuts go, things could not have gone much better for Reyes, who earned a “Performance of the Night” bonus for his efforts.

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7. Struggles continue

B.J. Penn almost had his first win since his November 2010 KO of Matt Hughes. Penn dropped Dennis Siver in the second round of their featherweight contest, but he was unable to get the finish, and instead of turning up the heat in the third round, Penn came out flat. Actually, flat might be too kind. Penn (16-12-2 MMA, 12-11-2 UFC) looked like he just wanted to survive the final five minutes of the fight, throwing a paltry 27 strikes to Siver’s 117 in the last round. In the end, Siver (23-11 MMA, 12-8 UFC), fighting for the first time in two years, got the majority decision win, handing Penn his fifth straight defeat.

Before the fight, Penn told MMAjunkie, “We’re going to take this as far as it can go,” which leads to the question, has Penn reached the end of the line?

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8. Back on track

Where Penn struggled at UFC Fight Night 112, another long-tenured UFC combatant showed he has some fight left in him. Clay Guida, competing at lightweight for the first time in five years, earned a unanimous decision victory over Erik Koch.

Guida looked excellent in his return to 155. His cardio was off the charts as usual, and his striking and defense were impressive, but where he excelled was in his pressure and takedown game. Guida (33-17 MMA, 13-11 UFC) forced Koch (14-5 MMA, 4-4 UFC) to the cage for a prolonged period in the first round and controlled the fight on the mat for most of the second and third round.

Guida was never close to getting a finish, but he looked good, and he should get a step up in completion in his next outing.

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9. A major comeback

Darrell Horcher’s run in the UFC has spanned 14 eventful months. In April 2016 he was called in on short notice duty to face Khabib Nurmagomedov. Unsurprisingly he lost that fight. One month later he was involved in a motorcycle accident which left him with a cringeworthy list of injuries.

Horcher (13-2 MMA, 1-1 UFC) was told he would never fight again, but he did, earning a split decision over Devin Powell (8-3 MMA, 0-2 UFC) in a lightweight contest at UFC Fight Night 112.

“It was so emotional for me to get back,” Horcher told MMAjunkie. “I fought so hard to be here. It was a long year and what I’ve come from, most would people say a year is very short. And if you look at it on paper it is, but for me it was very hard. I pushed myself to do this, to come back, to get a win.”

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10. Give him a call

The one misstep Jared Gordon made in his UFC debut came on the scale, where he missed the featherweight limit by four pounds. Gordon is a well-rounded fighter who was comfortable wherever his fight went against Michel Quinones. On the feet Gordon (11-1 MMA, 1-0 UFC) was aggressive, using pressure to close distance and not allow Quinones (8-2 MMA, 0-1 UFC) the space he needed to mount any offense. On the ground Gordon was just as good, coupling a heavy top game with effective ground strikes, which earned him the second-round TKO.

After the fight, the former Cage Fury champion, who has struggled with substance abuse issues, let fans know they could reach out to him if need be.

“If you have any problems or anything, you can contact me on Twitter, (or) Instagram and I will take my day to talk to you guys,” Gordon told Anik.

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For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 112 post-event facts: Don't let controversy overshadow Kevin Lee's success

The UFC’s return to Oklahoma City, Okla., provided plenty of fight time, with eight of the 13 fights on Sunday’s UFC Fight Night 112 lineup at Chesapeake Energy Arena going to a decision.

Kevin Lee (16-2 MMA, 9-2 UFC) didn’t need the scorecards to win the lightweight main event against Michael Chiesa (14-3 MMA, 7-3 UFC), but he could have used better officiating; his first-round submission win was overshadowed by a premature stoppage from referee Mario Yamasaki.

Nevertheless, “The Motown Phenom” got another notable win, helping advance his status in the UFC lightweight division. For more on the numbers to come out of Sunday’s event, check out 50 post-event facts from UFC Fight Night 112.

* * * *

General

Clay Guida

The UFC-Reebok Athlete Outfitting payout for the event totaled $182,500.

Debuting fighters went 2-1 at the event.

Lee, Tim Boetsch, Dominick Reyes and Jeremy Kimball earned $50,000 UFC Fight Night 112 fight-night bonuses.

UFC Fight Night 112 drew an announced attendance of 7,605 for a live gate of $549,302.

Betting favorites went 9-4 on the card.

Total fight time for the 13-bout card was 2:21:37.

Main card

Michael Chiesa and Kevin Lee

Lee’s five-fight UFC winning streak in lightweight competition is tied with Al Iaquinta for the third longest active streak in the division behind Tony Ferguson (nine) and Khabib Nurmagomedov (seven).

Lee’s nine UFC victories since 2012 in lightweight competition are most in the division.

Lee has earned eight of his nine career stoppage victories by submission.

Lee’s three-fight submission streak in UFC competition is the longest among active fighters.

Michael Chiesa

Lee has earned his past four victories by stoppage.

Lee has completed at least one takedown against 10 of his 11 UFC opponents.

Lee’s 25 takedowns since 2014 in UFC lightweight competition are most in the division.

Chiesa has suffered all three of his career losses by stoppage.

Chiesa failed to complete a takedown for the first time in his career.

Tim Boetsch (21-11 MMA, 12-10 UFC) improved to 3-1 since he returned to the UFC middleweight division in July 2016.

Tim Boetsch

Boetsch has earned his past four UFC victories by stoppage.

Johny Hendricks (18-7 MMA, 13-7 UFC) fell to 1-1 since he moved up to the UFC middleweight division in February.

Hendricks fell to 1-4 in his past five fights.

Hendricks has suffered both of his career stoppage losses by knockout.

Felice Herrig

Felice Herrig’s (13-6 MMA, 4-1 UFC) four victories in UFC strawweight competition are tied for second most in divisional history behind champ Joanna Jedrzejczyk (eight).

Herrig’s three-fight UFC winning streak in strawweight competition is the second longest active streak in the division behind Jedrzejczyk (eight).

Herrig has earned eight of her 13 career victories by decision.

Justine Kish (6-1 MMA, 2-1 UFC) had her six-fight winning streak snapped for the first defeat of her career.

Dominick Reyes

Reyes (7-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC) has earned six of his seven career victories by first-round stoppage.

Reyes’ 29-second victory marked the second fastest stoppage by any debuting light heavyweight in UFC history behind Ryan Jimmo’s seven-second win at UFC 149.

Joachim Christensen (14-6 MMA, 1-3 UFC) suffered the first knockout loss of his career.

Tim Means (27-8-1 MMA, 9-5 UFC) improved to 7-3 (with one no-contest) since he returned to the UFC for a second stint in May 2014.

Dennis Siver

Dennis Siver (23-11 MMA, 12-8 UFC) returned to competition after a more than two-year layoff and earned his first victory since October 2014.

Siver improved to 4-3 (with one no-contest) since he dropped to the UFC featherweight division in April 2012.

Siver has earned his past six UFC victories by decision. He hasn’t earned a stoppage victory since November 2010.

B.J. Penn (16-12-2 MMA, 12-11-2 UFC) suffered his fifth consecutive loss to extend the longest skid of his career. He hasn’t earned a victory since November 2010.

B.J. Penn

Penn fell to 1-7-1 in his past nine UFC appearances dating back to April 2010.

Penn fell to 0-3 since he dropped to the UFC featherweight division in July 2014.

Penn has been outlanded 747 to 312 in significant strikes during his past nine UFC fights.

Penn has suffered eight of his 12 career losses by decision.

Preliminary card

Clay Guida

Clay Guida (33-17 MMA, 13-11 UFC) was successful in his return to the UFC lightweight division. He earned his first victory in the weight class since June 2011.

Guida’s 63 takedowns landed in UFC competition are fifth most in company history behind Georges St-Pierre (87), Gleison Tibau (84), Frankie Edgar (67) and Demetrious Johnson (65).

Guida has attempted 172 takedowns during his UFC career, third most in company history behind Demian Maia (189) and Edgar (189).

Erik Koch (14-5 MMA, 4-4 UFC) fell to 2-4 in his past six UFC appearances.

Koch fell to 2-2 since returning to the UFC lightweight division in February 2014.

Carla Esparza

Carla Esparza (12-4 MMA, 3-2 UFC) improved to 2-1 since losing the UFC strawweight title to Joanna Jedrzejczyk in March 2015.

Esparza has completed at least one takedown against all five of her UFC opponents.

Esparza has completed 16 takedowns in her three UFC victories.

Maryna Moroz (8-2 MMA, 3-2 UFC) has suffered both of her career losses by decision.

Devin Powell (8-3 MMA, 0-2 UFC) has suffered all three of his career losses by decision.

Michel Quinones (8-2 MMA, 0-1 UFC) had his five-fight winning streak snapped for his first defeat since November 2012.

Quinones suffered the first knockout loss of his career.

Johnny Case (22-5 MMA, 4-2 UFC) suffered consecutive losses for the first time in nearly 10 years.

Jeremy Kimball

Case suffered the first decision loss of his career.

Kimball (15-6 MMA, 1-1 UFC) has earned 12 of his 15 career victories by stoppage.

Josh Stansbury (8-4 MMA, 1-2 UFC) suffered the first knockout loss of his career.

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

FightMetric research analyst and live statistics producer Michael Carroll contributed to this story. Follow him on Twitter @MJCflipdascript.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Fight Tracks: The walkout songs of UFC Fight Night 112, with Johnny Cash, Zeppelin, DMX

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While it take intense training, world-class skills and maybe even a bit of luck to register a UFC win, picking the right song to accompany you to the cage is a key talent, as well.

See what the fighters of Sunday’s UFC Fight Night 112 in Oklahoma City, Okla., went with as their backing tracks.

* * * *

Kevin Lee def. Michael Chiesa via submission (rear-naked choke) – Round 1, 4:37

Kevin Lee: “First Day Out” by Tee Grizzly

Michael Chiesa: “Stranglehold” by Ted Nugent

Tim Boetsch def. Johny Hendricks via TKO (punches) – Round 2, 0:46

Tim Boetsch: “The Man Comes Around” by Johnny Cash

Johny Hendricks: “I’ll Sing About Mine” by Josh Abbott Band

Felice Herrig def. Justine Kish via unanimous decision (30-26, 30-26, 29-27)

Felice Herrig: “Don’t Stop Believing” by Journey

Justine Kish: “Whole Lotta Love” by Led Zeppelin

Dominick Reyes def. Joachim Christensen via TKO (punches) – Round 1, 0:29

Dominick Reyes: “Congratulations” by Post Malone feat. Quavo

Joachim Christensen: “Holy Moly” by J Mix feat. Hakeem

Tim Means def. Alex Garcia via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-28, 29-28)

Tim Means: “Slipping” by DMX

Alex Garcia: “Banana Boat Song” by Harry Belafonte

Dennis Siver def. B.J. Penn via majority decision (28-28, 29-28, 29-27)

Dennis Siver: “Last Resort” by Papa Roach

B.J. Penn: “Hawaii 78″/”E Ale E” by Israel Kamakawlwo’Ole

Clay Guida def. Erik Koch via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-26, 30-27)

Clay Guida: “Kickstart My Heart” by Motley Crue

Erik Koch: “C’Mon (Catch ‘Em By Surprise)” by Tiesto vs. Diplo

Marvin Vettori def. Vitor Miranda via unanimous decision (29-28, 30-27, 30-27)

Marvin Vettori: “Falling Away From Me” by Marvin Vettori

Vitor Miranda: “Save Me” by Remy Zero

Carla Esparza def. Maryna Moroz via unanimous decision (30-27, 29-28, 29-28)

Carla Esparza: “Bodies” by Drowning Pool

Maryna Moroz: “BomBom” by Macklemore & Ryan lewis feat. The Teaching

Darrell Horcher def. Devin Powell via split decision (29-28, 28-29, 29-28)

Darrell Horcher: “Miracle” by Nonpoint

Devin Powell: “We’re Alive” by Eyenine

Jared Gordon def. Michel Quinones via TKO (strikes) – Round 2, 4:24

Jared Gordon: “Flash” by Queen

Michel Quinones: “Keep It Thoro” by Prodigy

Tony Martin def. Johnny Case via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-28, 29-28)

Tony Martin: “The Last Breath” by Future

Johnny Case: “Soul to Squeeze” by Red Hot Chili Peppers

Jeremy Kimball def Josh Stansbury via TKO (punches) – Round 1, 1:21

Jeremy Kimball: “You Can’t Stop Me” by Andy Mineo

Josh Stansbury: “Many Men” by 50 Cent

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 112 Athlete Outfitting pay: Program payout total passes $13 million

OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. – Fighters from Sunday’s UFC Fight Night 112 event took home UFC Athlete Outfitting pay, a program that launched after the UFC’s deal with Reebok, totaling $182,500.

UFC Fight Night 112 took place at Chesapeake Arena in Oklahoma City, Okla. The main card aired on FS1 following prelims on FS2 and UFC Fight Pass.

The third highest non-PPV event payout of the year saw four fighters earn a maximum non-title payout. Veterans Tim Boetsch (21-11 MMA, 12-10 UFC), Dennis Siver (23-11 MMA, 12-8 UFC), B.J. Penn (16-12-2 MMA, 12-11-2 UFC), and Clay Guida (33-17 MMA, 13-11 UFC) each took home $20,000 for making 21 or more appearances under the program structure.

The full UFC Fight Night 112 UFC Athlete Outfitting payouts included:

Kevin Lee: $10,000
def. Michael Chiesa: $5,000

Tim Boetsch: $20,000
def. Johny Hendricks: $15,000

Felice Herrig: $2,500
def. Justine Kish: $2,500

Dominick Reyes: $2,500
def. Joachim Christensen: $2,500

Tim Means: $10,000
def. Alex Garcia: $5,000

Dennis Siver: $20,000
def. B.J. Penn: $20,000

Clay Guida: $20,000
def. Erik Koch: $10,000

Marvin Vettori: $2,500
def. Vitor Miranda: $5,000

Carla Esparza: $2,500
def. Maryna Moroz: $2,500

Darrell Horcher: $2,500
def. Devin Powell: $2,500

Jared Gordon: $2,500
def. Michel Quinones: $2,500

Tony Martin: $5,000
def. Johnny Case: $5,000

Jeremy Kimball: $2,500
def. Josh Stansbury: $2,500

Under the UFC Athlete Outfitting program’s payout tiers, which appropriate the money generated by Reebok’s multi-year sponsorship with the UFC, fighters are paid based on their total number of UFC bouts, as well as Zuffa-era WEC fights (January 2007 and later) and Zuffa-era Strikeforce bouts (April 2011 and later). Fighters with 1-5 bouts receive $2,500 per appearance; 6-10 bouts get $5,000; 11-15 bouts earn $10,000; 16-20 bouts pocket $15,000; and 21 bouts and more get $20,000. Additionally, champions earn $40,000 while title challengers get $30,000.

In addition to experience-based pay, UFC fighters will receive in perpetuity royalty payments amounting to 20-30 percent of any UFC merchandise sold that bears their likeness, according to officials.

Full 2017 UFC-Reebok sponsorship payouts:

Year-to-date total: $2,807,500
2016 total: $7,138,000
2015 total: $3,185,000
Program-to-date total: $13,130,500

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC Fight Night 112 results: Clay Guida's mat pressure too much for Erik Koch

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Returning to the lightweight division after a three-year run as a featherweight, Clay Guida was in vintage form against Erick Koch.

Guida (33-17 MMA, 13-11 UFC) avoided danger from Koch (14-5 MMA, 4-4 UFC) on the feet and dominated the fight on the mat to pick up a unanimous decision.

The lightweight bout closed out the preliminary card of today’s UFC Fight Night 112 event at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Okla. It aired on FS2 following additional prelims on UFC Fight Pass and ahead of the main card on FS1.

The final scores were 29-28, 29-26 and 30-27 for Guida, who snapped a two-fight skid and got back in the win column after a 3-4 run at 145 pounds.

The extra weight didn’t make much of a difference in his energy levels. Guida’s cardio was just as good as in previous performances, though he marshaled his energy more efficiently this time out.

Rather than waste time bouncing around, Guida got to business early, working to find his way around a straight left Koch brought to keep him at bay. A winging right hand was the diversion Guida needed to get inside, though it didn’t pay dividends until the second round.

Guida put the fight on the mat early and capitalized on Koch’s lack of defense to take mount position, closing out the round with a flurry of punches from overhead. Although none of the shots put Koch in danger of losing consciousness, they made a statement to judges.

Koch didn’t have much more luck staying upright in the third round. After missing his first attempt, Guida redoubled his efforts and got Koch to the mat. Again, he took mount and closed out the fight with another spate of punches and shoulder strikes from up top.

Koch drops to 2-2 as a UFC lightweight after an uneven run as a featherweight.

Up-to-the-minute UFC Fight Night 112 results include:

For complete coverage of UFC Fight Night 112, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

(MMAjunkie’s John Morgan contributed to this report on site in Oklahoma City.)

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Source: MMA Junkie