UFC Hall of Famer Tito Ortiz 'comfortably retired now,' shuts door on return to fighting

Tito Ortiz made rival Chael Sonnen tap out earlier this year, and that, it seems, is how the “Huntington Beach Bad Boy” is content finishing his MMA career.

Ortiz, who has come out of retirement before, told MMAjunkie on Friday that he’s “comfortably retired now” and has no intention of competing ever again.

“As a fighter, it’s time to say it’s over after 20 years of competition,” the UFC Hall of Famer said. “I’m 42 years old. I’ve been through eight surgeries, and I still have my head on my shoulders, which I’m very, very lucky. Fortunate for the things that I’ve had through mixed martial arts, so I’m just trying to use the best of it to build the name of Tito Ortiz.

“I’m doing well, man. Just working hard and chasing this American dream, and I’m living it.”

Ortiz (19-12-1), a former light heavyweight champion, first retired in 2012 after a 27-fight UFC career ended with a second loss to Forrest Griffin at UFC 148. Ortiz’s retirement didn’t last long, though, as he signed with Bellator and returned to the cage in 2014.

Ortiz competed four times with the promotion, going 3-1. That includes a rear-naked choke submission win over Sonnen (30-15-1) in January at Bellator 170. Ever since then – much like before the fight – the two men have engaged in a war of words on social media and in the press.

In August, following neck surgery, Ortiz posted a video on Instagram updating his condition and seemed to call out Sonnen when he ended with these words: “Now it’s time to get ready, because, Chael, I’m kicking your ass.”

Asked if a rematch with Sonnen could actually lure him out of retirement, Ortiz mostly joked with his response.

“You know what? I may kick Chael’s ass just one time, just because, maybe for free,” Ortiz said, laughing. “Because I hate the guy.”

Then Ortiz’s tone of voice changed.

“I really don’t want to, but I really dislike that guy a lot,” he continued. “But I’m not looking forward to it, man. I’m not looking forward to training again. I’m not looking forward to being on the grind. But that guy just can’t shut his mouth about me.”

While Ortiz’s disdain for Sonnen is real, he insists the potential for a return to fighting isn’t. Ortiz these days is focused on other endeavors, including his sports management company, Primetime 360, which represents UFC women’s featherweight champion Cris Cyborg. He also has the newly formed Tito Ortiz Auto Group, a wholesale and retail car dealership.

There’s also Hollywood. Ortiz has a part in Tyler Perry’s “Boo 2! A Madea Halloween,” which hits theaters next Friday, and is hopeful of future acting opportunities.

So, fighting again? It looks unlikely.

“I’ve learned a lot through my life – mixed martial arts, as a business man, as an entreprenuer, and as a fighter and a father,” Ortiz said. “It’s just time to shut that door and open up other doors.”

For more on the upcoming MMA schedule, visit the MMA Rumors section of the site.

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Filed under: Bellator, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

What happens when you pay a fighter to retire? What happens when you stop?

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Buried in a 58-page pitch to potential investors was a plan for the UFC’s future that former fighters like Chuck Liddell might have been very interested to read. That plan included ways to increase profits through various “cost-saving opportunities,” such as tightening up certain “compensation practices.”

One such practice? The use of “long-lived consultants.”

That was in the summer of 2016, right around the time the UFC was sold to WME-IMG following weeks of denials, both to the public and internally to employees, about rumors of a sale.

Former UFC light-heavyweight champion Liddell had been retired for roughly six years by that point, all of which he’d spent on the UFC payroll. That seemed to be a big part of the reason he retired when he did. Following Liddell’s third straight knockout loss, UFC President Dana White urged his longtime friend to hang up the gloves, and he succeeded with help from the promise of a perpetual paycheck for a do-nothing gig as a UFC “executive.”

It was the first time the UFC had paid one of its stars to perform the service of not fighting, but it wouldn’t be the last. Former UFC welterweight champion Matt Hughes would also wind up retiring to take a similar gig (“one of those Chuck Liddell jobs,” he said once years earlier, while discussing the prospect of retirement and rubbing his hands together at the thought) in 2013.

Former “TUF” winner and light-heavyweight champion Forrest Griffin also got a similar role, as did former interim heavyweight champion Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira.

For the moment, at least, Griffin and Nogueira still have their jobs; Liddell and Hughes don’t. Perhaps not coincidentally, Griffin and Nogueira are both known for actually doing stuff relating to their jobs, while both Liddell and Hughes seemed intent on driving home the point that they were collecting checks for what they had done, and not what they were doing.

Still, for a time this system worked. It offered a solution to a problem. Pro fighters are notorious for not knowing when to quit. While promoters can refuse to give them any more fights, they can’t stop a competitor from stepping up with an offer to fill the void. If you care enough about an aging fighter’s health or legacy – or you just want to keep him out of the hands of another promoter – paying him to do nothing is an effective strategy.

Trouble is, it’s also expensive. The old Zuffa might have been willing to eat that cost, but the new regime was less enthusiastic. So what’s a guy like Liddell supposed to do now?

He seems to be asking himself the same question. On a recent episode of “The MMA Hour,” Liddell admitted he’d been caught by surprise when the UFC job that was supposed to be his for life suddenly evaporated.

“Life changes,” Liddell said. “And I think at first I took it a little hard, but now I look at it as a blessing in disguise. It’s got me re-motivated to go out and find what I really want to do.”

That’s where it gets tricky. The whole reason the UFC was paying Liddell was because it worried that what he might really want to do is fight some more.

Now Liddell is 47. His last win was nearly 10 years ago, but that’s not a significant barrier to entry in today’s MMA landscape. Over in Bellator, the home of MMA’s senior tour, company president Scott Coker says Liddell would need “a battery of tests” before he could fight. Then again, when you’ve already promoted a fight between Dada 5000 and Kimbo Slice, you might have to forgive people for assuming that your medical standards aren’t that high.

If Liddell did come out of retirement for Bellator, there’s Chael Sonnen, beckoning him to join in a prolonged debate to be followed by a show of geriatric athletics for the enrichment of all parties involved. There, too, is old friend Tito Ortiz, who Liddell probably still punches in his sleep on particularly restful nights.

And you could see why Liddell would be tempted to join them, couldn’t you? Especially if he feels like the UFC paid for what was left of his prime and then dumped him once it needed to cut costs.

You have to wonder how the UFC president would feel then, watching his old buddy back in the cage, but this time under another banner. It’s exactly the scenario White was trying to prevent, but in the end he might only succeed in delaying it.

Plus, no matter what you think of the practice of paying fighters to quit, the experiment seems to have a limited future. Who would trade whatever’s left of their career for a cushy UFC gig now, especially since there seems to be no better than a 50-50 chance of holding onto the job?

That leaves us right back where we started, with a stubborn problem that combat sports can’t quite solve. Old fighters, when confronted with the question of what they really want to do next, so often decide that it’s the thing they did last. If you’re looking for a different answer, it’s probably going to cost you.

For more on the UFC’s upcoming schedule, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: Bellator, Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Scott Coker: Chuck Liddell would need 'battery of tests' before fighting in Bellator

UFC Hall of Famer Chuck Liddell is talking like he’s about to make a comeback in the Bellator cage. But if he does, it won’t be as simple as just signing a fight deal.

“I’d have to talk to Viacom about it,” Bellator President Scott Coker told MMAjunkie, referring to the promotion’s corporate parent. “He’d have to go through a battery of tests, and it would be a longer process than he would be fighting in January.”

Liddell (21-8 MMA, 16-6 UFC) recently welcomed a matchup with three-time UFC title challenger and Bellator star Chael Sonnen (30-14-1 MMA, 1-1 BMMA), prompting more speculation about ending his retirement seven years after a trio of knockout losses ended his UFC career.

But Coker said he hasn’t even spoken to Liddell about fighting as of late. Instead, he’s interested in having the ex-champ work with Bellator behind the scenes, as he was when rumors of a comeback first surfaced.

“I’ve got to reach out and see if (Liddell would) like to do some fan fest stuff for us and be in the community, but that’s it,” Coker said. “There’s no fight for him.”

Asked whether he’s completely ruled out the idea of a Liddell return, Coker said, “We really haven’t even had that conversation.”

Whatever agreement Liddell and Sonnen might have worked out on their own, it sounds like Coker will need convincing – and for good reason. Liddell’s most recent losses demonstrated a decreased capacity for taking punches to the head, a stark reversal from his earlier career when his chin was a huge advantage.

UFC President Dana White expressed concerns for Liddell’s health and declared his career was over after a knockout loss to Mauricio “Shogun” Rua at UFC 97. But Liddell convinced White to let him make one more octagon walk, signing on to fight ex-champ Rich Franklin at UFC 115. After a spirited exchange late in the first round, Franklin caught Liddell with a right to the jaw and sent him flopping to the canvas.

Recently on social media, Liddell has shown off an improved physique to indicate he’s close to fight shape. But he wouldn’t just have to convince Coker he’s able to fight. He would need to submit medical paperwork to prove he’s healthy enough to do it professionally.

For more on Bellator’s upcoming schedule, check out the MMA Rumors section of the site.

Filed under: Bellator, Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

If Chuck Liddell ends retirement, he says Chael Sonnen would be easy warmup fight

Former UFC light heavyweight Chuck Liddell is still living comfortably in retirement. However, he seems to seriously be considering a comeback to the cage.

Liddell (21-8 MMA, 16-6 UFC), who was essentially forced into retirement by UFC President Dana White in 2010 following a string of three consecutive knockout losses, says his fighting spirit never left.

It’s been more than seven years since the UFC Hall of Famer stepped in a cage, and while he’s far from announcing a comeback, the 47-year-old said he can’t entirely rule out it out.

“I’m never going to say 100 percent no (to fighting again).” Liddell told TMZ.

Hypothetically, though, if Liddell were to come back, there’s one fighter he’s repeatedly mentioned as a potential opponent: multi-time UFC title challenger Chael Sonnen (30-14-1 MMA, 1-1 BMMA), who’s been taking potshots at Liddell for months in hopes he’ll sign with Bellator.

Sonnen, who’s coming off a unanimous-decision win over Wanderlei Silva at Bellator NYC in June, is someone Liddell could see himself fighting, he said. Why? Liddell thinks it would be the perfect way to ease himself back into the sport after such a lengthy hiatus.

“Chael’s the easy fight,” Liddell said. “If I was going to come back, it’s a good one. It’s a good warmup fight. He talks a lot. I think that’s why he does all that WWE style.”

It didn’t take long for Sonnen to catch wind of Liddell’s comments. Naturally, he did his best to continue to bait him back into the cage (via Twitter):

For more on the Bellator schedule, check out the MMA Rumors section of the site.

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Filed under: Bellator, News
Source: MMA Junkie

Chael Sonnen rips Jon Jones, who he suspected of cheating, after failed drug test

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Filed under: Featured, News, UFC

Chael Sonnen knows a thing or two about flunking a drug test. He’s a repeat offender in his career and knows what it’s like to be in the shoes of UFC light heavyweight Jon Jones after news broke that he’d tested positive for a banned substance stemming from his UFC 214 title victory over Daniel Cormier.

On Tuesday, the UFC and U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), which oversees the UFC’s drug testing program, revealed Jones (23-1 MMA, 17-1 UFC) had failed an in-competition drug test the night before his UFC 214 bout with Cormier (19-2 MMA, 8-2 UFC), which he won by third-round knockout.

The result marked the second time in 13 months that Jones had been notified of a failed drug test, along with one that led to his last-minute removal from UFC 200 in July 2016. Sonnen’s (29-15-1 MMA, 1-1 BMMA) multiple offenses during his own career cost him three years of competition time, so he can relate to what Jones is going through, even if the news doesn’t come as a personal shock.

“It’s not great,” Sonnen said during Wednesday’s edition of “SportsCenter” on ESPN. “I remember the old days where the only marquee fighter failing a drug test was me. But all of a sudden it’s become a little more common. It wasn’t a big surprise. I can tell you as a guy who lived on that side of the tracks that as soon as I saw Jon Jones with his shirt off that he was using something. I also thought that because he was coming in off a suspension that he must have found a way to maneuver around the test. It appears that he did not.”

Although Jones, who earned a first-round TKO over Sonnen at UFC 159 in April 2013, still has the right to due process and could potentially have his name cleared by USADA as has been in the case with other athletes in the past, the immediate fallout from the situation looks grim.

Jones could face a maximum punishment of four years, and if that’s the case UFC President Dana White said the chances of “Bones” ever returning to the octagon would be slim. Sonnen said he doesn’t believe Jones will be out that long, and instead predicted a two-year sentence. If that’s the case, he said this won’t be the end of Jones as an active fighter.

“I don’t think this will be the end of Jon Jones’ career,” Sonnen said. “I think this will blow over and he will be able to come back. Jon Jones was never the draw the media reported him to be. He doesn’t have any T-shirt records, he doesn’t have live gate records and he certainly doesn’t have pay-per-view records.

“The point that I’m making is, politics do matter in this situation. A situation like this, it’s good to have a friend on the inside. I don’t know that Jon has many bridges left. He likes to set fire to them as much as he likes to put a needle in his butt. It’s not great for Jon Jones, but there’s no way I can sugarcoat it.”

As far as the discussed future fight between Jones and former UFC heavyweight champion Brock Lesnar, the chances of that happening have been greatly reduced, Sonnen said. The pair built some hype around a potential fight before and after UFC 214, but with Jones future in the air and Lesnar still required to serve more than six months of suspension time for a drug test failure of his own, the fantasy fight appears to have been squashed.

“That’s not going to happen,” Sonnen said. “I think that had a lot more legs to it than people thought, but Jon Jones is going to be knee-deep in red tape for a while. I don’t think that he’s going to get anything less than two years. He also has to fight this battle on two fronts: He has to deal with the California State Athletic Commission, where his last match with Daniel Cormier took place, and then he’s going to have to deal with USADA. They do not have to agree with one another.

“Whoever gives him the bigger, longer punishment is what he’s going to have to serve. That’s going to be at least two years in my opinion.”

For more on UFC 214, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Chael Sonnen responds to Tito Ortiz's callout on Twitter just how you'd expect

UFC Hall of Famer Tito Ortiz recently provided an update this week on his post-neck surgery condition, posting an Instagram video in which he specifies details the procedure and how he’s feeling while also thanking friends, family and Bellator for their support.

Ortiz, who retired more than six months ago, closed out the video with this:

“I’m alive. I’m fixed. Now it’s time to get ready because, Chael, I’m kicking your ass.”

That obviously was Ortiz (19-12-1 MMA, 3-1 BMMA) hinting at un-retiring for a rematch with Chael Sonnen (30-15-1 MMA, 1-1 BMMA), who tapped out to a rear-naked choke in their fight earlier this year at Bellator 170. You know Sonnen wouldn’t let that go without a response, which he issued on Twitter.

That’s a classic Chael Sonnen response, ladies and gentlemen, especially the part about “I’m glad I beat you.” Because, you know, he is “still undefeated and still undisputed” no matter what any of us think.

For more on the upcoming Bellator schedule, visit the MMA Rumors section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid4621179066001?bckey=AQ~~,AAAABvaL8JE~,ufBHq_I6FnxR-PQW_F3sm5QdUbP7D6E9&bctid=5292304600001
Filed under: Bellator, Blue Corner, Featured Videos
Source: MMA Junkie

Replay of Bellator NYC, with Silva-Sonnen and Fedor-Mitrione, airs tonight on Spike

Filed under: Bellator, Blue Corner, News, Videos

We’re a month removed from Bellator’s second foray into the world of pay-per-view.

Did you miss it, but would love the opportunity to see it, or see it all over again? Spike will broadcast a replay of Bellator NYC tonight.

The two and a half hour broadcast airs on Spike at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

And regardless of what you thought of the matchups and results, there’s little denying Bellator NYC was historic for the promotion, given it was its return to the pay-per-view stage, as well as its first trip to the famed Madison Square Garden in New York City.

Bellator NYC took place June 24 at the famed Madison Square Garden in New York City. The main card aired on pay-per-view following a Bellator 180 card on Spike.

On the pay-per-view card, there was no shortness of oddities. After Douglas Lima (29-6 MMA, 11-2 BMMA) cruised past Lorenz Larkin (18-6 MMA, 0-1 BMMA) to retain his welterweight title, Aaron Pico (0-1 MMA, 0-1 BMMA) was upset by heavy underdog Zach Freeman (9-2 MMA, 1-0 BMMA). And Michael Chandler (16-4 MMA, 13-4 BMMA) lost the lightweight title to Brent Primus (8-0 MMA, 6-0 BMMA) in odd circumstances.

In a double headliner, Matt Mitrione (12-5 MMA, 3-0 BMMA) beat Fedor Emelianenko (36-5 MMA, 0-1 BMMA) by knockout – after the two of them knocked each other down at the same time. And in the main event, Chael Sonnen (29-15-1 MMA, 1-1 BMMA) settled his grudge with Wanderlei Silva (35-13-1 MMA, 0-1 BMMA).

For complete coverage of “Bellator: NYC” and Bellator 180, check out the MMA Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Filed under: Bellator, Blue Corner, News, Videos
Source: MMA Junkie

Virtual reality: Behind the scenes of long-awaited Chael Sonnen vs. Wanderlei Silva fight

Filed under: Bellator, Featured Videos, News, Videos

(usatoday.com first published this story.)

According to legendary mixed martial artist Chael Sonnen, the most painful punches aren’t the soft ones or the hard ones. It’s the in between punches that hurt the most.

He should know. Sonnen has been fighting for the past two decades. VRtually There joined him at his home gym, Gracie Barra Portland, where he was putting in long hours to prepare for a match that was three years in the making. His fight with Wanderlei Silva was arguably the biggest event of his career.

Follow Sonnen’s gripping journey to face rival Silva, known as “The Axe Murderer,” in the cage at Madison Square Garden in the video above.

40-year-old Sonnen first entered the MMA world as a fan in 1993. Four years later, he had his first fight. As a boy, Sonnen developed a strong sense of discipline from witnessing his dad work as a plumber through rain, snow, weekends, and evenings. It’s this relentless work ethic that has kept him competitive, when so many of his peers have retired.

“I’ve never missed a competition in my life due to illness and injury, and it’s not because I haven’t been sick and it’s not because I haven’t been hurt,” says Sonnen.

Leading up to the Silva fight, Sonnen’s training regimen included eight intense workouts a week. He spent most of his days boxing, kickboxing, wrestling, and sparring. Some people assume Sonnen is fearless for choosing such a demanding profession. He adamantly claims that’s not the case. He feels fear all the time, and knows that with each match he’s putting his dreams and goals on the line. But giving up is foreign territory for the light heavyweight champion.

A bully will pick his opponent. A bully will only go out there and fight guys he knows he can win. I would never be a part of that. I would fight them all. Some go your way and some don’t go your way. But I will strap up, put my mouthpiece in and make that walk every single time.”

When the three rounds came to a close, it was Sonnen that had his hand raised. Watch the grueling preparation that went into the win and go cageside for the match itself in the video above.

For complete coverage of Bellator NYC, check out the MMA Events section of the site.

For the ideal experience, view in 360 degrees on your mobile phone or in VR headsets such as Google cardboard or Daydream. Subscribe to VRtually There on YouTube, browse the “Virtual Reality” section of the USA TODAY app (iOS | Android), or download our VR Stories Daydream app to catch three new episodes every week.

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Filed under: Bellator, Featured Videos, News, Videos
Source: MMA Junkie

MMA coach Ryan Parsons talks about writing 'Four-Pack Revolution' with Chael Sonnen

Longtime MMA coach and manager Ryan Parsons and Bellator star Chael Sonnen have written an ode to the underachievers of dieting.

Rather than target those who want to get shredded in mere weeks, they assembled advice for the folks who struggle to stick to anything.

“We said, screw a six-pack – it’s for teenagers and drug addicts,” Parsons told MMAjunkie Radio. “Aim for a four-pack. That’s reasonable for a lot of people.”

The result – “The Four-Pack Revolution: How You Can Aim Lower, Cheat on Your Diet, and Still Lose Weight & Keep It Off” – offers a version of having one’s cake and eating it, too. Set for a December release, the book doesn’t tell you to stop eating junk food, and it doesn’t give you an exercise routine more suited for an active UFC fighter than an office worker.

The way Parsons sees things, it’s better to offer realism than promise a physical transformation that is largely fantasy.

“A lot of (books), especially in the fitness modeling world, (the models are) all in the genetic prime of their life,” Parsons said. “While you’re at work, they’re in the gym. By the time that picture gets taken, they’ve been dieting for weeks or months. They’ve got an awesome photographer with great lighting, they’ve been retouched and photoshopped, and they’re taking steroids. So you want to lose weight and feel great about yourself, and this is the expectation. That’s bull(expletive).”

Without great genetics, Parsons said, it doesn’t much matter the diet and workout plan you choose. So you might as well resolve to shooting for the middle when it comes to changing your life habits.

“If coaching and diet matters, then Greg Jackson would turn everybody into Jon Jones,” Parsons said. “It can’t happen like that. It’s a very small percentage of people who are blessed with a specific genetic, especially when it comes to fat on your lower abs.”

One good thing about testing Parson and Sonnen’s theory? One of its authors needed a turnaround. Parsons said when Sonnen started contemplating a comeback, he was a shell of the athlete that thrice challenged for a UFC title and admittedly used chemical shortcuts to give himself an advantage.

“When he stopped fighting, he got really out of shape,” Parsons said. “He was up to almost 260 pounds, and it wasn’t pretty. He set a 12-month clock in his head and said, ‘OK, if it starts, it’s got to start now. I’m not going to wait until three months.’ He had to go through the same process that many people who get out of shape do, and that’s start back to basics and get going again. We chronicled it all in this book, and it’s pretty cool.”

After a disastrous outing in his Bellator debut in January, Sonnen (30-15-1 MMA, 1-1 BMMA) got back in the win column this past month with a decision over rival Wanderlei Silva in the pay-per-view headliner of Bellator NYC. Next, the “American Gangster” hopes to face off with former PRIDE champion Fedor Emelianenko (36-5 MMA, 0-1 BMMA).

MMAjunkie Radio broadcasts Monday-Friday at 1 p.m. ET (10 a.m. PT) live from Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino’s Race & Sports Book. The show is hosted by “Gorgeous” George Garcia and producer Brian “Goze” Garcia. For more information or to download past episodes, go to www.mmajunkie.com/radio.

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Filed under: Bellator, News
Source: MMA Junkie

Video: Go behind the scenes of historic Bellator: NYC at Madison Square Garden

Filed under: Bellator, News, Videos

We’re a week removed from Bellator’s second foray into the world of pay-per-view.

And regardless of what you thought of the matchups and results, there’s little denying Bellator: NYC was historic for the promotion, given it was its return to the pay-per-view stage, as well as its first trip to the famed Madison Square Garden in New York City.

Now you can relive the event, which included a Bellator 180 card on Spike, through Bellator’s “Backstage” behind-the-scenes video.

“Bellator NYC: Backstage” includes footage from boxer Heather Hardy (1-0 MMA, 1-0 BMMA), who made her pro MMA debut with a win, and Conor McGregor teammate James Gallagher (7-0 MMA, 4-0 BMMA), who stayed unbeaten. Plus, in the Bellator 180 headliner, Ryan Bader (23-5 MMA, 1-0 BMMA) beat Phil Davis (17-4 MMA, 4-1 BMMA) to become Bellator’s light heavyweight champion.

On the pay-per-view card, there was no shortness of oddities. After Douglas Lima (29-6 MMA, 11-2 BMMA) cruised past Lorenz Larkin (18-6 MMA, 0-1 BMMA) to retain his welterweight title, Aaron Pico (0-1 MMA, 0-1 BMMA) was upset by heavy underdog Zach Freeman (9-2 MMA, 1-0 BMMA). And Michael Chandler (16-4 MMA, 13-4 BMMA) lost the lightweight title to Brent Primus (8-0 MMA, 6-0 BMMA) in odd circumstances.

Matt Mitrione (12-5 MMA, 3-0 BMMA) beat Fedor Emelianenko (36-5 MMA, 0-1 BMMA) by knockout – after the two of them knocked each other down at the same time. And in the main event, Chael Sonnen (29-15-1 MMA, 1-1 BMMA) settled his grudge with Wanderlei Silva (35-13-1 MMA, 0-1 BMMA).

Check out the full video above.

For complete coverage of “Bellator: NYC” and Bellator 180, check out the MMA Events section of the site.

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Filed under: Bellator, News, Videos
Source: MMA Junkie