MMAjunkie's 'Fight of the Month' for October: A bloody brawl that ends in a draw

With another action-packed month of MMA in the books, MMAjunkie looks at the best fights from October. Here are the five nominees, listed in chronological order, and winner of MMAjunkie’s “Fight of the Month” award for October.

At the bottom of the post, let us know if we got it right by voting on your choice.

* * * *

The Nominees

Bobby Green vs. Lando Vannata at UFC 216

Every time Lando Vannata (9-2-1 MMA, 1-2-1 UFC) has stepped in the octagon he’s delivered a bonus-worthy performance. He did it again in his lightweight bout with Bobby Green (23-8-1 MMA, 4-3-1 UFC), but it wasn’t enough to leave with a victory.

Vannata had a point taken away in the first round when he threw an illegal knee. Green continued despite absorbing the blow, and it was high-intensity for the remainder of the bout. Green’s late rally got him back in the fight, and the judges rules the contest a split draw.

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Beneil Dariush vs. Evan Dunham at UFC 216

It was a tale of two fights for Evan Dunham (18-6-1 MMA, 11-6-1 UFC) and Beneil Dariush (14-3-1 MMA, 8-3-1 UFC), and the result of the entertaining lightweight bout was a majority draw.

Dariush had a big first round against Dunham, and it resulted in a pair of 10-8 scores. So even though Dunham won the second two rounds from that same pair of judges, it only got him to a pair of 28-28 scores for the draw. A third judge gave the fight to Dariush, 29-28.

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Tony Ferguson def. Kevin Lee at UFC 216

It was far from an easy night of work for Tony Ferguson (24-3 MMA, 14-1 UFC), but a third-round a slick triangle choke”>triangle choke got Kevin Lee (16-3 MMA, 9-3 UFC) to tap, crowning “El Cucuy” as the UFC’s newest interim champion.

After a back-and-forth two rounds began the fight, Ferguson’s superiority on the ground allowed him to set up. Lee attempted to fight out, but the choke was too fight and he was forced to tap out, crowning Ferguson as the new interim UFC lightweight champion.

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Brian Kelleher def. Damian Stasiak at UFC Fight Night 118

Brian Kelleher (18-8 MMA, 2-1 UFC) had to struggle through some early adversity against Damian Stasiak (10-5 MMA, 2-3 UFC), and then he had to find a way to put away an extremely tough opponent.

Kelleher managed to do both, rallying from behind to win the bantamweight contest. He wore Stasiak down with his physicality and managed to thump his way to a TKO stoppage with less than 90 seconds remaining in the fight.

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Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos def. Max Griffin at UFC Fight Night 119

Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos (18-5 MMA, 4-1 UFC) nearly put Max Griffin (13-4 MMA, 1-2 UFC) away in the first, causing many to criticize the referee, doctors and cornermen. Griffin managed to stay in the fight, though, hurting dos Santos in the second.

But after a wild fight with swings in both directions, it was dos Santos who put things together down the stretch to beat a very tough Griffin via unanimous decision after three rounds of exciting welterweight action.

Instagram Photo

* * * *

The Winner: Bobby Green vs. Lando Vannata

In a razor-thin fight, it was a point deduction that led to the draw between lightweights Vannata and Green.

Vannata had a point taken away in the first round when he threw an illegal knee against Green. Each fighter took a 29-27 score, and a third judge scored the fight 28-28. Absent the point deduction for the illegal knee, Vannata would have walked away with a split decision win.

Vannata pushed Green back early, then ducked under a Green left hand. The two tied up briefly, and when they broke it was Vannata who landed two heavy leg kicks, the second of which nearly took Green off his feet. After a brief clinch on the fence, where Green landed a solid elbow, Vannata landed a head kick.

Green survived it, but seconds later Vannata stunned Green and put him on the canvas. He went after him and landed ground-and-pound, but when Green tried to get up, with one of his knees still grounded, Vannata threw a big knee. He knew immediately it was illegal and referee Herb Dean stopped the fight.

Although the replays showed the knee didn’t land flush, it still was an illegal strike, and Dean took a point. On the restart, Vannata went after a guillotine choke, but Green fought out of it and with 75 seconds left they went back to work in the center of the cage. Vannata attacked Green’s lead leg down the stretch, then got a late takedown. But the point deduction turned a 10-9 round for Vannata into a 9-9.

Green landed a good left hand early in the second, but it was Vannata who made it look a little easier finding homes for his strikes. Green stayed in the fight with counters, but Vannata’s right was more effective. Even though it didn’t seem Green was landing heavy shots, Vannata was wearing the damage on his face from Green’s jabs. Midway through, Green pushed Vannata to the fence, but Vannata shrugged him off and dropped him to the canvas. Green got up quickly, but a scramble moments later had Vannata ready to take advantage.

Back on the feet, Vannata landed a huge right hand, then started pouring it on with Green’s hands down. With a minute left, they started slugging. Vannata landed a leg kick. Green landed a knee to the body. And they both were feeling the effects late in the frame.

The two kept trading in the third, and a takedown attempt from Vannata wasn’t there a minute in. Green made sure the cuts on Vannata’s face kept the blood flowing, touching him up just enough. Green caught Vannata a few more times midway through. But Vannata kept the offense flowing, as well. They slugged it out down the stretch, and it was Green who landed several huge combinations just before the horn. Vannata walked away still standing, but with the blood gushing.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Even in super slo-mo, Demetrious Johnson's UFC 216 finish is pretty unfathomable

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Slow it down all you want, Demetrious Johnson’s incredible submission of Ray Borg at UFC 216 still blows the mind.

As you’d expect, Johnson’s “Submission of the Year” candidate was featured in the UFC’s latest “Phantom Cam” highlights package, covering this past weekend’s UFC 216 event in Las Vegas. The sequence might be even more impressive when it’s slowed down enough for mere mortals to understand.

Check out that highlight and more – including some fantastic footage of the “Fight of the Night” between Bobby Green and Lando Vannata, as well as Tony Ferguson’s interim title-winning performance over Kevin Lee – in the footage above.

For complete coverage of UFC 216, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

After wild UFC 216 result, Bobby Green says judges aren't looking at right things

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UFC lightweight veteran Bobby Green would rather hand off judging duties to his fighting peers, biased as they might be, than those professionally tasked to score fights.

“I don’t feel like we have good judges,” Green (23-8-1 MMA, 4-3-1 UFC) told reporters following a split draw against Lando Vannata (9-2-1 MMA, 1-2-1 UFC) at UFC 216, which took place this past Saturday at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. “I can’t even care what the judges think. Sometimes, they’re totally on, and sometimes, they’re totally off. That’s the way it is in our sport.”

Green said he’s gone to the scorecards several times thinking he’d won, only to get bad news. Now, he approaches a matchup with the intention of winning a bonus, so regardless of whether or not the right call is made, he picks up an extra $50,000.

It drives him crazy to think about what the judges are looking at when a fight goes down.

“We don’t get enough credit for who’s pressing the action,” he said. “A lot of times, one guy chases the other guy around, and he ticks and tacks and runs, but he doesn’t get the credit for being the aggressor.

“Even though we say we judge upon aggression and cage control, they don’t give enough credit to those things. Because if I don’t push the fight, there is no fight. We’ll just be standing there looking at each other. But nobody understands that. Until you’ve fought, you wouldn’t understand that.”

This time around, Green actually got a break on scorecards. But it was only because Vannata threw an illegal knee that cost him one point.

At the time he gave his backstage interview, Green was hopeful he’d done enough to earn a bonus. As it turned out, his thrilling 15-minute scrap was one of four $50,000 checks written out at UFC 216, so he couldn’t complain too much about what had transpired.

Still, in an interview Monday on MMAjunkie Radio, he hinted it would have been nice to have been able to win his full purse, rather than the half paid out with no official winner.

“That would be lovely to have a little taste, and have a better opportunity to make more money,” Green said. “I feel the same way, and I’ll bet Lando feels the same way.”

With 10-8 rounds being rewarded more frequently in MMA, the two draws seen at UFC 216 could be a preview of coming attractions. As a solution, some have suggested a tiebreaking round to determine a fight’s winner in the case of a draw at the end of a fight. Green likes the idea, but he has reservations.

“Maybe we could finish it up,” he said. “I was really catching on to what he was doing more, and my punches were more effective. I think that would be awesome if we could have another round. But at the same time, does that constitute more pay? You do want to find a winner, and the crowd wants to see more action.

“But to be honest, they want to see action at the expense of two good guys, to great fighters. Should we get paid more for that?”

If Green is taking more damage, he of course wants to get paid more money. For fighters still working their way to a title shot, that eases the sting of battles endured on the way to glory.

“I’m all down for it,” he said. “You’re asking me to fight more, but are you asking to pay me more? I’m all down for the fight, don’t get me wrong, but there’s two human beings losing their lives. I took shots and he took shots. Every time I get in the cage, you can bet on that.”

Then again, another solution is to simply do away with “win” bonuses, which might do away with the incentive for fighters to take more conservative gameplans in hopes of doubling their paychecks.

According to Green, “that would be the best and the ultimate.” But for now, he’ll just have to keep fighting for those bonuses. The way it sounded, he wasn’t expecting a discretionary bonus that might make up for his win purse.

One thing he did gain, however, was a new comrade. Out on the town after his win, he bumped into Vannatta, who was nursing his own wounds with a drink.

“I gave him a big hug, and I let him know we’re brothers in war,” he said. “That was awesome. I’m down to do it again if he wants to do it again, but at the same time, we should get paid more for doing what we’re going to do.”

For more on UFC 216, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Stream or download MMAjunkie Radio #2539 with guests Tony Ferguson, John Moraga, Bobby Green, Simon Samano

Stream or download Monday’s episode of MMAjunkie Radio with guests Tony Ferguson, John Moraga, Bobby Green and Simon Samano.

Ferguson, Moraga and Green all fought this past Saturday at UFC 216 in Las Vegas. Ferguson won the interim lightweight title with a submission of Kevin Lee in the main event. Moraga knocked out previously unbeaten Magomed Bibulatov for a $50,000 bonus. Green fought to a split draw and won “Fight of the Night” against Lando Vannata. MMAjunkie’s Samano was in Las Vegas to cover the event and recapped the big stories that came out of the fight card.

You can stream the entire episode on AudioBoom.com or below.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC 216 medical suspensions: Ray Borg potentially out six months with finger injury

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UFC flyweight Ray Borg could be out for six months following a failed bid to unseat dominant champ Demetrious Johnson.

Borg’s arm isn’t the problem, however. After tapping to an armbar in the fifth round of UFC 216’s co-headliner, the Nevada State Athletic Commission cited his right right finger as the area of concern.

Borg (11-3 MMA, 5-3 UFC) needs an orthopedist to clear him, or he could sit out a half-year, according to medical suspensions released today by the NSAC, which regulated the pay-per-view event at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.

Although Johnson (27-2-1 MMA, 15-1-1 UFC) reported a potential knee injury following his record-breaking 11th title defense, he got off scot-free with no suspension.

Headliner Tony Ferguson (24-3 MMA, 14-1 UFC), who claimed the interim lightweight title, has a three-week suspension for a possible corneal abrasion, while opponent Kevin Lee (16-3 MMA, 9-3 UFC) sits for two months after his third-round submission loss, which came after a brutal weight cut made more miserable by an active staph infection.

The full list of medical suspensions stemming from UFC 216 include:

  • Tony Ferguson: Suspended until Oct. 29 for possible left eye corneal abrasion.
  • Kevin Lee: Suspended until Nov. 7.
  • Ray Borg: Needs fourth right finger cleared by orthopedic doctor or suspended until April 6; minimum suspension runs to Nov. 7 with no contact until Oct. 29.
  • Mara Romero Borella: Must repeat MRI of brain in six months, due April 7.
  • Evan Dunham: Needs ophthalmologist clearance on blurred vision or no contest until Dec. 7, no contact until Nov. 22.
  • Cody Stamann: Suspended until Nov. 7 with no contact until Oct. 29.
  • Tom Duquesnoy: Suspended until Nov. 22 with no contact until Nov. 7.
  • Lando Vannata: Suspended until Dec. 7 with no contact until Nov. 22.
  • Bobby Green: Suspended until Nov. 22 with no contact until Nov. 7.
  • Pearl Gonzalez: Suspended until Nov. 7 with no contact until Oct. 29.
  • Poliana Botelho: Needs right elbow and right thumb cleared by orthopedic doctor or suspended until April 6; minimum suspension runs to Nov. 7 with no contact until Oct. 29.
  • Matt Schnell: Needs right forearm X-rayed; if broken, needs clearance by orthopedic doctor or suspended until April 6.
  • Marco Beltran: Needs left thumb X-rayed and cleared by orthopedic doctor or suspended until April 6; minimum suspension runs to Nov. 7 with no contact until Oct. 29.
  • Magomed Bibulatov: Suspended until Nov. 22 with no contact until Nov. 7.
  • Thales Leites: Needs possible right orbital fracture cleared by orthopedic doctor or suspended until April 6; minimum suspension runs to Nov. 22 with no contact until Nov. 7.

For complete coverage of UFC 216, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Watch MMAjunkie Radio here (1 p.m. ET) with Bobby Green, John Moraga and Simon Samano

Filed under: News, UFC

MMAjunkie Radio kicks off today at 1 p.m. ET (10 a.m. PT) with guests Bobby Green, John Moraga and Simon Samano.

Green fought Lando Vannata to a draw at UFC 216, where Moraga scored a big knockout win over Magomed Bibulatov. MMAjunkie assistant editor Samano was in Las Vegas covering the event.

MMAjunkie Radio airs from 1 to 3 p.m. ET (10 a.m. to noon PT), live from Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. You can watch and listen live on MMAjunkie’s Facebook and YouTube pages. Additionally, SiriusXM Rush (Ch. 93) carries a replay later in the day (8-10 p.m. ET) and the following morning (7-9 a.m. ET), or catch a replay on demand.

MMAjunkie Radio listener guide:

  • HOW TO WATCH (ON WEB): Watch a live stream on MMAjunkie’s Facebook or YouTube pages.
  • HOW TO CALL: MMAjunkie Radio takes phone calls from listeners throughout the show. Call into the MMAjunkie Radio hotline at (866) 522-2846.
  • HOW TO DISCUSS: The MMAjunkie MMA Forums has a section devoted solely to MMAjunkie Radio. Stop by the MMAjunkie Radio forum to discuss the show, interact with the hosts, suggest future guests and catch up on the latest MMAjunkie Radio news.
  • HOW TO VISIT THE SHOW: You can watch MMAjunkie Radio live and in person at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino on the world-famous Las Vegas Strip. The booth is located in the resort’s Race & Sports Book next to the Mandalay Bay poker room. To plan a trip to Sin City and MMAjunkie Radio, go to www.mandalaybay.com.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Trading Shots: Is it time to abolish the draw in MMA?

UFC 216 had two different bouts end in draws, a rare occurrence that hasn’t happened since 1999. But is that a satisfying way for a fight to end, or should the UFC think about instituting some changes to make sure that someone ends up a winner? MMAjunkie columnist Ben Fowlkes joins retired WEC and UFC fighter Danny Downes to discuss.

Fowlkes: Who’d have guessed it, Danny? UFC 216 gave us not one but two draws on Saturday night in Las Vegas. That’s like seeing a shooting star on your drive home and then being so distracted by it that you hit a unicorn.

I can’t be mad at either result. Lando Vannata lost a point for an illegal knee, which was a penalty he deserved, so that threw the scorecards in his fight with Bobby Green out of whack. Then Beneil Dariush and Evan Dunham fought to a draw that also just felt right, considering how close the fight was.

I understand that a tie is an unsatisfying result in a lot of ways, but should MMA get a little more comfortable with the draw, or do we need to get rid of it altogether? Should we institute a “sudden victory” round in these matters? And how are promotions and rankings supposed to treat two guys who fought to a bloody stalemate? Do we just tell them both to move on and act like they kind of won, but kind of didn’t?

Downes: Get comfortable with draws? I bet you’re the Missoula hipster who calls NFL games “American Football.” Do all those soccer stars who write into your podcast send you those fancy scarves in the mail, too?

In all seriousness, I’m not opposed to draws per se, but I’m not exactly wild about them. I feel about them the way that the Griffin family felt about their vacation to purgatory. Especially in the Green/Vannata match, I understand why that was the result. but there’s no progression. What do you do with Green and Vannata? It was a great fight, but doing an immediate rematch does nothing for either fighter.

I don’t hate the draw result, but they aren’t necessary. Why not institute the “sudden victory” round? It seems to work fine on “The Ultimate Fighter.” Thanks to the beauty of editing, we don’t know how long the turnaround is between the judges’ decision and the extra round. If there’s a way to ensure there isn’t an extended lapse, what’s the issue?

At the end of the day, I’m sure it will come down to money. Fighters would obviously want some extra pay if they have to go an extra round, and promoters won’t want to pay it. There may be some other technical issues having to do with pacing or TV time, but those should be easily remedied.

What do you say Ben? Let’s abolish the draw!

Fowlkes: First of all, I’d love one of those scarves and now I’m mad no one’s sent me one. Second, instituting the sudden victory round shouldn’t be so hard.

The UFC makes you fight two extra rounds for the privilege of being the main event, which is another decision it made unilaterally without input from the fighters, so this shouldn’t be so different. The IFL did it, even if it almost never got to use it. The UFC had the provision for that flyweight title tournament, even if it was robbed of the chance to use it thanks to a screwup by officials. So clearly, it’s possible.

What I object to are the people who would rather have the judges close their eyes and pick a winner than admit that sometimes it really is too close to call. I don’t have a problem with judges who give out 10-10 rounds. I have much more of a problem with judges who see everything as a 10-9, as if there’s no difference between winning by a little and winning by a lot.

I recognize that draws create a problem for promoters who want to know who should move up and who should move down after every fight. I’d be all for an extra round to help figure it out. But after watching three awesome, bloody rounds between Vannata and Green, did anybody seriously feel disappointed by scorecards that refused to label one of them a loser?

Downes: Well what do you know? This is one of the few times you’ve seen reason and agree with the correct side (me).

I agree that the sudden victory would require some work, but it seems very plausible. It would be nice if the UFC and other organizations would negotiate with fighters, but they’ve mandated far more intrusive things in the past.

I also think the sudden victory format would improve judging. Instead of over-weighting takedowns or “octagon control,” an increase in 10-10 scoring could convince fighters to win a round more definitively. The strategy of waiting away a round and then trying to score some quick points in the final 30 seconds becomes much less beneficial under this format.

As far as your question about if anyone felt disappointed, you’re leading the witness by phrasing it that way. I don’t think anybody felt disappointed, but what if I asked, “did anybody seriously feel satisfied by scorecards that refused to label one of them a winner?” It would be the same answer.

Draws are the “meh” of decisions. Are they better than a decision which forces a winner? Sure, but being better than bad doesn’t necessarily make it something good.

It’s also worth noting that how a fight ends does have an effect on us, regardless of how much we enjoyed the match. It’s the same way that you can enjoy 90 percent of a movie, but if there’s a crappy ending, you end up hating the whole thing. I’m not saying that an increase in draws will make MMA fights into M. Night Shymalan films, but let’s not pretend they’re pleasant to see either.

Ben Fowlkes is MMAjunkie and USA TODAY’s MMA columnist. Danny Downes, a retired UFC and WEC fighter, is an MMAjunkie contributor who has also written for UFC.com and UFC 360. Follow them on twitter at @benfowlkesMMA and @dannyboydownes.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC 216's Lando Vannata appeared to enjoy his ambulance ride after another 'Fight of the Night'

Lando Vannata is setting the bar quite high for himself early in his UFC career, winning four fight-night bonuses in four octagon appearances.

Vannata (9-2-1 MMA, 1-2-1 UFC) participated in his third “Fight of the Night” on Saturday when he battled Bobby Green (23-8-1 MMA, 4-3-1 UFC) to a split draw in their lightweight matchup at UFC 216, which took place at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas and aired on pay-per-view following prelims on FX and UFC Fight Pass.

“Groovy” established himself as a big-time action fighter when he gave Tony Ferguson a wild fight in his short-notice octagon debut at UFC Fight Night 91 in July 2016. Although he only has one victory in four UFC appearances, Vannata has built himself a solid following, and he seems to enjoy frequently finding himself in a bloodbath (via Instagram):

Instagram Photo

Glad @bobbykinggreen and I could put on a fuckin show for the 1500 first responders in attendance! #vegasstrong #ufc216 #thegroovyking

Vannata got off to an early lead against Green in the UFC 216 matchup. He got himself the win when an illegal knee led to a point deduction, which ultimately led to the draw.

Despite falling short of the win, Vannata did pick up another bonus and raise his additional purse money to $200,000 in the UFC.

For complete coverage of UFC 216, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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Filed under: Blue Corner, Featured Videos, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

UFC 216 post-event facts: Demetrious Johnson's resume must be seen to be believed

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Despite going through four fight changes in the final two weeks, UFC 216 delivered an action-packed card on Saturdayat T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.

Both championship fights at the top of the pay-per-view lineup, which followed prelims on FX and UFC Fight Pass, ended with a submission. Tony Ferguson (23-3 MMA, 13-1 UFC) claimed the interim UFC lightweight title with a third-round triangle choke of Kevin Lee (16-3 MMA, 9-3 UFC) in the headliner, while flyweight champ Demetrious Johnson (27-2-1 MMA, 15-1-1 UFC) made history for most consecutive title defenses with a dazzling fifth-round armbar victory over Ray Borg (11-3 MMA, 5-3 UFC).

Both Ferguson and Johnson landed a prominent place in the UFC record books with their crafty finishes, but they weren’t the only UFC 216 fighters with noteworthy results. For more on the numbers to come out of the event, check below for 60 post-event facts from UFC 216.

* * * *

General

UFC 216 joined UFC 22 in September 2001 as the only events in UFC history with two draws.

The UFC-Reebok Athlete Outfitting payout for the event totaled $242,500.

Johnson, John Moraga, Lando Vannata and Bobby Green earned $50,000 UFC 216 fight-night bonuses.

Debuting fighters went 2-0 on the card.

UFC 216 drew an announced attendance of 10,638 for a live gate of $677,999.50.

Betting favorites went 6-3 on the card. Two fights ended in a draw.

Total fight time for the 11-bout card was 2:12:54.

Main card

Ferguson improved to 16-1 in his past 17 fights. The lone defeat in that stretch came to Michael Johnson at UFC on FOX 3 in May 2012.

Ferguson’s 13-1 record after 14 UFC appearances is the best of any fighter to come from “The Ultimate Fighter” reality series.

Ferguson’s 10-fight UFC winning streak in lightweight competition is the longest in active streak in the division.

Ferguson’s 10-fight UFC winning streak in lightweight competition is the longest in divisional history.

Ferguson’s 10-fight winning streak in UFC competition is the fourth longest active streak in the company behind D. Johnson (13), Georges St-Pierre (12) and Max Holloway (11).

Ferguson has earned 19 of his 23 career victories by stoppage. That includes nine of his 13 UFC wins.

Ferguson became the second fight in UFC history to win a title fight by triangle choke. Anderson Silva also accomplished the feat against Chael Sonnen at UFC 117.

Kevin Lee

Lee suffered the first submission loss of his career.

Lee has completed at least one takedown against 11 of his 12 UFC opponents.

Lee’s 28 takedowns since 2014 in UFC lightweight competition are most in the division.

Johnson’s 11 consecutive UFC title defenses are most among current titleholders.

Johnson’s 11 consecutive title defenses are the most in UFC history.

Johnson’s 12 victories in UFC title fights are tied with St-Pierre for most in company history.

Johnson’s seven stoppage victories in UFC title fights are third most in company history behind Silva (nine) and Matt Hughes (eight).

Johnson’s 13-fight UFC winning streak in flyweight competition is the longest active streak in the division.

Johnson’s 13-fight UFC winning streak is the longest active streak in the company.

Johnson’s 13-fight UFC winning streak is tied with Jon Jones for the second longest streak in company history behind Silva (16).

Johnson’s 13 victories in UFC flyweight competition are the most in divisional history.

Johnson’s seven stoppage victories in UFC flyweight competition are the most in divisional history.

Johnson’s five submission victories in UFC flyweight competition are the most in divisional history.

Johnson’s three fifth-round stoppage victories are most in UFC history.

Johnson’s 57 takedowns landed in UFC flyweight competition are most in divisional history.

Johnson’s 73 takedowns landed overall in UFC competition are third most in company history behind St-Pierre (87) and Gleison Tibau (84).

Johnson has been awarded eight fight-night bonuses for UFC flyweight bouts, the most in divisional history.

Borg suffered the first stoppage loss of his career.

Borg’s 22 total strikes landed are the fifth fewest in a UFC title fight to reach the fifth round.

Fabricio Werdum (22-7-1 MMA, 10-4 UFC) improved to 8-2 since he returned to the UFC for a second stint in February 2012.

Werdum has earned seven of his 10 UFC victories by stoppage.

Werdum’s 65-second victory was the fastest of his career.

Werdum’s five submission victories in UFC/Strikeforce heavyweight competition are tied for second most in combined divisional history behind Frank Mir (eight).

Walt Harris (10-6 MMA, 3-5 UFC) fell to 3-2 since he returned to the UFC for a second stint in April 2016.

Harris suffered the first submission loss of his career.

Mara Romero Borella

Mara Romero Borella (12-4 MMA, 1-0 UFC extended her unbeaten streak to seven fights. She hasn’t suffered a defeat since October 2015.

Kalindra Faria (18-6-1 MMA, 0-1 UFC) has suffered four of her six career losses by stoppage.

Faria suffered her first submission loss since March 31, 2011 – a span of 2,384 days (more than six years) and 17 fights.

Evan Dunham’s (18-6-1 MMA, 11-6-1 UFC) five-fight UFC unbeaten streak in lightweight competition is tied for the third longest active streak in the division behind Ferguson (10) and Khabib Nurmagomedov (seven).

Preliminary card

Cody Stamann (15-1 MMA, 2-0 UFC) has earned both of his UFC victories by decision.

Tom Duquesnoy (15-2 MMA, 1-1 UFC) had his 12-fight unbeaten streak snapped for his first defeat since February 2013.

Duquesnoy suffered the first decision loss of his career.

Green (23-8-1 MMA, 4-3-1 UFC) extended the longest winless skid of his career to four fights. He hasn’t earned a victory since July 2014.

Poliana Botelho (6-1 MMA, 1-0 UFC) earned the first decision victory of her career.

Pearl Gonzalez (6-3 MMA, 0-2 UFC) has suffered two of her three career losses by decision.

Matt Schnell

Matt Schnell (10-4 MMA, 1-2 UFC) earned his first decision victory since his MMA debut on Sept. 14, 2012 – a span of 1,850 days (more than five years) and 13 fights.

Marco Beltran (8-5 MMA, 3-3 UFC) fell to 0-2 since he dropped to the UFC flyweight division in June 2017.

Beltran suffered the first decision loss of his career.

Moraga’s (18-6 MMA, 7-5 UFC) seven victories in UFC flyweight competition are third most in divisional history behind D. Johnson (13) and Joseph Benavidez (10).

Moraga has earned five of his seven UFC victories by stoppage.

Moraga’s five stoppage victories in UFC flyweight competition are second most in divisional history behind Johnson (seven).

Magomed Bibulatov (14-1 MMA, 1-1 UFC) had his 14-fight winning streak snapped for the first defeat of his career.

Brad Tavares

Brad Tavares (16-4 MMA, 11-4 UFC) has earned his past nine UFC victories by decision. His most recent stoppage win was a first-round knockout of Phil Baroni at UFC 125 in January 2011.

Thales Leites (27-8 MMA, 12-7 UFC) fell to 7-4 since he returned to the UFC in August 2013.

Leites fell to 2-4 in his past six UFC appearances.

Leites has suffered seven of his eight career losses by decision.

For complete coverage of UFC 216, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

FightMetric research analyst and live statistics producer Michael Carroll contributed to this story. Follow him on Twitter @MJCflipdascript.

Filed under: News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie

Full UFC 216 salaries: New champ Tony Ferguson gets $500K of event's $2.1-million payout

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Filed under: Featured, News, UFC

Newly crowned interim UFC lightweight champion Tony Ferguson was the top earner at Saturday’s UFC 216 event.

Ferguson (23-3 MMA, 13-1 UFC), who picked up a third-round submission victory over Kevin Lee (16-3 MMA, 9-3 UFC) in the headliner, earned a disclosed payout of $500,000 – $250,000 of which was a win bonus. Lee picked up $250,000, and if victorious, would have earned an extra $50,000 as a win bonus.

MMAjunkie obtained the list of disclosed payouts from the Nevada State Athletic Commission on fight night.

UFC 216 took place at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, and the main card aired on pay-per-view following prelims on FX and UFC Fight Pass.

Another top earner was flyweight champion Demetrious Johnson (27-2-1 MMA, 15-1-1 UFC), who notched a UFC-record 11th consecutive title defense with a nifty fifth-round tap-out of Ray Borg (11-3 MMA, 5-3 UFC) in the co-headliner. “Mighty Mouse” earned a flat rate of $370,000; Borg got $100,000 (and also wasn’t eligible for a win bonus).

The total disclosed payout for the event topped $2 million – $2,148,000, to be precise.

The full list of UFC 216 payouts included:

Tony Ferguson: $500,000 (includes $250,000 win bonus)
def. Kevin Lee: $250,000

Demetrious Johnson: $370,000 (no win bonus)
def. Ray Borg: $100,000

Fabricio Werdum: $400,000 (includes $125,000 win bonus)
def. Walt Harris: $28,000

Mara Romero Borella: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Kalindra Faria: $12,000

Beneil Dariush: $48,000*
vs. Evan Dunham: $40,000*

Cody Stamann: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Tom Duquesnoy: $23,000

Bobby Green: $24,000*
vs. Lando Vannata: $25,000*

Poliana Botelho: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Pearl Gonzalez: $10,000

Matt Schnell: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Marco Beltran: $14,000

John Moraga: $68,000 (includes $34,000 win bonus)
def. Magomed Bibulatov: $17,000

Brad Tavares: $74,000 (includes $37,000 win bonus)
def. Thales Leites: $57,000

* – Fight ended in a draw; no win bonuses given

Now, the usual disclaimer: The figures do not include deductions for items such as insurance, licenses and taxes. Additionally, the figures do not include money paid by sponsors, including the official UFC Athlete Outfitting sponsorship program pay. They also do not include any other “locker room” or special discretionary bonuses the UFC often pays. They also do not include pay-per-view cuts that some top-level fighters receive.

For example, as previously reported, UFC officials handed out additional $50,000 UFC 216 fight-night bonuses to Johnson and Moraga (“Performance of the Night”) and Green and Vannata (“Fight of the Night”).

In other words, the above figures are simply base salaries reported to the commission and do not reflect entire compensation packages for the event.

For more on UFC 216, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Filed under: Featured, News, UFC
Source: MMA Junkie