UFC 218 post-event facts: Max Holloway and Francis Ngannou doing record-setting stuff

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“The Blessed Era” continued in a big way on Saturday when UFC featherweight champon Max Holloway further added to his ridiculous resume with another victory over Jose Aldo in UFC 218[s pay-per-view headliner.

Holloway (19-3 MMA, 15-3 UFC) defended his 145-pound title for the first time with a third-round TKO of Aldo (26-4 MMA, 8-3 UFC) at Little Caesars Arena in Detroit.

“Blessed” wasn’t the only one to put himself in the record books, though. For more on the numbers to come out of the UFC’s penultimate pay-per-view of the year, check below for 60 post-event facts from UFC 218.

* * * *

General

Little Caesars Arena

The UFC-Reebok Athlete Outfitting payout for the event totaled $185,000.

Eddie Alvarez, Justin Gaethje, Yancy Medeiros and Alex Oliveira earned $50,000 UFC 218 fight-night bonuses. All earned “Fight of the Night” bonuses (“Performance of the Night” awards weren’t issued).

Debuting fighters went 0-1 on the card.

UFC 218 drew an announced attendance of 17,587 for a live gate of $2 million.

Betting favorites went 10-3 on the card.

Total fight time for the 13-bout card was 2:11:47.

Main card

Max Holloway

Holloway extended his career-high winning streak to 12 fights. He hasn’t suffered a defeat since August 2013.

Holloway, 25, became the youngest fighter in UFC history to earn 15 victories with the organization.

Holloway became the fifth fighter in UFC history to tally a 12-fight winning streak.

Holloway’s 12-fight winning streak in UFC competition is fifth longest in company history behind Anderson Silva (16), Jon Jones (13), Demetrious Johnson (13) and Georges St-Pierre (13).

Holloway’s 11-fight winning streak in UFC competition is third longest among active fighters in the company behind Johnson (13) and St-Pierre (13).

Holloway’s 11-fight UFC winning streak in featherweight competition is the longest active streak in the division.

Max Holloway

Holloway’s 14 victories in UFC featherweight competition are the most in divisional history.

Holloway’s nine stoppage victories in UFC featherweight competition are the most in divisional history.

Holloway’s seven knockout victories in UFC featherweight competition are most in divisional history.

Holloway became the first fighter in UFC history to land 100 or more significant strikes in six separate fights.

Aldo fell to 1-3 in his past four fights after going undefeated for more than a decade.

Aldo has suffered all three of his career losses by stoppage. That includes three knockout losses in UFC competition.

Francis Ngannou

Francis Ngannou’s (11-1 MMA, 6-0 UFC) six-fight winning streak in UFC heavyweight competition is the longest active streak in the division.

Ngannou’s six-fight stoppage streak in UFC competition is the longest among active fighters.

Ngannou became the fourth modern-era UFC fighter to begin his career with the organization with six consecutive stoppages. Silva, Rich Franklin and Ronda Rousey also accomplished the feat.

Ngannou has earned all 11 of his career victories by stoppage.

Ngannou has earned five of his six UFC victories by knockout.

Alistair Overeem

Alistair Overeem (43-15 MMA, 8-5 UFC) fell to 7-2 in his past nine UFC appearances dating back to December 2014.

Overeem’s 11 knockout losses in MMA competition are the most of any active member on the UFC roster.

Henry Cejudo (12-2 MMA, 6-2 UFC) has earned five of his six UFC victories by decision.

Sergio Pettis (16-3 MMA, 7-3 UFC) fell to 4-2 since he dropped to the UFC flyweight division in March 2015.

Pettis suffered the first decision loss of his career.

Eddie Alvarez

Alvarez (29-5 MMA, 4-2 UFC) improved to 1-1 (with one no-contest) in his past three fights.

Alvarez has earned 23 of his 29 career victories by stoppage.

Alvarez and Gaethje (18-1 MMA, 1-1 UFC) combined for 227 significant strikes landed, the fourth highest single-fight total in UFC lightweight history.

Gaethje had his 18-fight winning streak snapped for the first defeat of his career.

Tecia Torres’ (10-1 MMA, 6-1 UFC) six victories in UFC strawweight competition are second most in divisional history behind Joanna Jedrzejczyk (eight).

Torres has earned nine of her 10 career victories by decision.

Michelle Waterson (14-6 MMA, 2-2 UFC) suffered her first decision loss since June 30, 2007 – a span of 3,808 days (more than 10 years) and 18 fights.

Preliminary card

Paul Felder

Paul Felder (15-3 MMA, 7-3 UFC) has earned five of his seven UFC victories by stoppage.

Charles Oliveira (22-8 MMA, 10-8 UFC) fell to 1-1 since he returned to the UFC lightweight division in April 2017. He’s 3-4 in the organization at 155 pounds.

Charles Oliveira fell to 2-4 in his past six fights.

Charles Oliveira has suffered four of his seven career losses by knockout.

Yancy Medeiros vs. Alex Oliveira

Medeiros (15-4 MMA, 6-4 UFC) improved to 3-0 since he moved up to the UFC welterweight division in September 2016.

Medeiros has earned all three of his UFC welterweight victories by stoppage.

Medeiros vs. Alex Oliveira (17-4-1 MMA, 7-3 UFC) was the first fight in UFC history to feature two knockdowns for each fighter.

Alex Oliveira (17-4-1 MMA, 7-3 UFC) fell to 5-2 (with one no-contest) in UFC welterweight competition.

Alex Oliveira suffered the first knockout loss of his career.

Drakkar Klose (8-1-1 MMA, 2-1 UFC) had his nine-fight unbeaten streak snapped for the first defeat of his career.

Felice Herrig

Felice Herrig’s (14-6 MMA, 5-1 UFC) five victories in UFC strawweight competition are tied with champ Rose Namajunas for third most in divisional history behind Jedrzejczyk (eight) and Torres (six).

Herrig’s four-fight UFC winning streak in strawweight competition is the longest active streak in the division.

Herrig has earned nine of her 14 career victories by decision.

Cortney Casey (7-5 MMA, 3-4 UFC) has suffered all four of her UFC losses by decision.

Amanda Cooper

Amanda Cooper (3-3 MMA, 2-2 UFC) earned the first knockout victory of her career.

Angela Magana (11-9 MMA, 0-3 UFC) suffered her fifth consecutive loss to extend the longest skid of her career. She hasn’t earned a victory since August 2011.

Magana suffered the first knockout loss of her career.

Abdul Razak Alhassan (8-1 MMA, 2-1 UFC) has earned all his career victories by first-round knockout.

Sabah Homasi (11-7 MMA, 0-2 UFC) has suffered five of his six career losses by stoppage.

Dominick Reyes

Dominick Reyes (8-0 MMA, 2-0 UFC) has earned seven of his eight career victories by first-round stoppage. That includes both of his UFC wins.

Jeremy Kimball (15-7 MMA, 1-2 UFC) has suffered all seven of his career losses by stoppage.

Kimball has suffered six of his seven career losses by submission.

Justin Willis (6-1 MMA, 2-0 UFC) has earned all of his career stoppage victories by knockout.

Allen Crowder (9-3 MMA, 0-1 UFC) has suffered all three of his career losses by knockout.

For complete coverage of UFC 218, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

FightMetric research analyst and live statistics producer Michael Carroll contributed to this story. Follow him on Twitter @MJCflipdascript.

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Yancy Medeiros and Alex Oliveira met up for hospital pic following UFC 218 'Fight of the Night'

DETROIT – Yancy Medeiros and Alex Oliveira produced one of the most exciting fights in recent memory at UFC 218, and it was all love afterward.

Medeiros (15-4 MMA, 6-4 UFC) and Oliveira (17-4-1 MMA, 7-3 UFC) put on a thrilling fight at Saturday’s event, which took place at Little Caesars Arena in Detroit. The welterweight bout aired on the FS1-televised prelims prior to the pay-per-view main card, and it was one of two UFC 218 bouts that earned “Fight of the Night” honors (along with Eddie Alvarez vs. Justin Gaethje).

Medeiros and Oliveira were both dropped multiple times in their fight. Medeiros, though, emerged with a third-round TKO win, which moved him to 3-0 since he jumped up to 170 pounds in September 2016. Afterward, the fighters were transported to hospital, where they met up for a picture. Alex Davis, Oliveira’s manager, sent us the image:

UFC officials said Medeiros and Oliveira were transported to the hospital for precautionary reasons, and though they were sporting some superficial damage, both fighters appeared to be in high spirits after the memorable encounter.

For complete coverage of UFC 218, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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UFC 218 Athlete Outfitting pay: Program total passes $16 million mark

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DETROIT – Fighters from Saturday’s UFC 218 event took home UFC Athlete Outfitting pay, a program that launched after the UFC’s deal with Reebok, totaling $185,000.

UFC 218 took place at Little Caesars Arena in Detroit, and the main card aired on pay-per-view following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass.

Leading the way was UFC featherweight champion Max Holloway (19-3 MMA, 15-3 UFC), who earned a maximum program payout of $40,000 as a titleholder. “Blessed” defended his belt against Jose Aldo (26-4 MMA, 9-3 UFC) by third-round TKO in the event headliner.

The full UFC 218 UFC Athlete Outfitting payouts included:

Max Holloway: $40,000
Jose Aldo: $30,000

Alistair Overeem: $10,000
Francis Ngannou: $5,000

Henry Cejudo: $5,000
Sergio Pettis: $5,000

Eddie Alvarez: $5,000
Justin Gaethje: $2,500

Tecia Torres: $5,000
Michelle Waterson: $2,500

Charles Oliveira: $15,000
Paul Felder: $5,000

Alex Oliveira: $10,000
Yancy Medeiros: $10,000

David Teymur: $2,500
Drakkar Klose: $2,500

Felice Herrig: $5,000
Cortney Casey: $5,000

Amanda Cooper: $2,500
Angela Magana: $2,500

Sabah Homasi: $2,500
Abdul Razak Alhassan: $2,500

Jeremy Kimball: $2,500
Dominick Reyes: $2,500

Justin Willis: $2,500
Allen Crowder: $2,500

Under the UFC Athlete Outfitting program’s payout tiers, which appropriate the money generated by Reebok’s multi-year sponsorship with the UFC, fighters are paid based on their total number of UFC bouts, as well as Zuffa-era WEC fights (January 2007 and later) and Zuffa-era Strikeforce bouts (April 2011 and later). Fighters with 1-5 bouts receive $2,500 per appearance; 6-10 bouts get $5,000; 11-15 bouts earn $10,000; 16-20 bouts pocket $15,000; and 21 bouts and more get $20,000. Additionally, champions earn $40,000 while title challengers get $30,000.

In addition to experience-based pay, UFC fighters will receive in perpetuity royalty payments amounting to 20-30 percent of any UFC merchandise sold that bears their likeness, according to officials.

Full 2017 UFC-Reebok sponsorship payouts:

Year-to-date total: $5,847,500
2016 total: $7,138,000
2015 total: $3,185,000
Program-to-date total: $16,170,500

For complete coverage of UFC 218, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Fight Tracks: The walkout songs of UFC 218, including plenty of Detroit references – and Imagine Dragons times two

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While it takes intense training, world-class skills and maybe even a bit of luck to register a UFC win, picking the right song to accompany you to the cage is a key talent, as well.

See what the fighters of Saturday’s UFC 218 in Detroit went with as their backing tracks.

* * * *

Max Holloway def. Jose Aldo via TKO (strikes) – Round 3, 4:51

Max Holloway: “Blessings/Hawaiian Kickboxer” by Big Sean/Moke Boy

Jose Aldo: “Somos Sente De Zambada” by Lenin Ramirez feat. Regulo Cabo

Francis Ngannou def. Alistair Overeem via knockout (punches) – Round 1, 1:42

Francis Ngannou: “Mi Gente” by J Balvin

Alistair Overeem: “Put Your Hands Up 4 Detroit” by Fedde Le Grand

Henry Cejudo def. Sergio Pettis via unanimous decision (30-27, 30-27, 30-27)

Henry Cejudo: “The Show Goes On” by Lupe Fiasco

Sergio Pettis: “Good Life” by Kanye West feat. T-Pain

Eddie Alvarez def. Justin Gaethje via knockout (knee, punches) – Round 3, 3:59

Eddie Alvarez: “Victory” by Puff Daddy feat. The Notorious B.I.G. & DMX

Justin Gaethje: “Champion” by Keznamdi

Tecia Torres def. Michelle Waterson via unanimous decision (30-27, 29-28, 29-28)

Tecia Torres: “Techno Syndrome/Dreamer” The Immortals/Charlie XCX

Michelle Waterson: “Believer” by Imagine Dragons

Paul Felder def. Charles Oliveira via knockout (strikes) – Round 2, 4:06

Paul Felder: “Thunder” by Imagine Dragons

Charles Oliveira: “O Hino” by Fernandinho

Yancy Medeiros def. Alex Oliveira via TKO (punches) – Round 3, 2:02

Yancy Medeiros: “We are Hawaii’s Finest/Till I Collapse” by Ekulo/Eminem

Alex Oliveira: “Balada” by Gusttavo Lima

David Teymur def. Drakkar Klose via unanimous decision (30-27, 30-27, 29-28)

David Teymur: “Suryoyo Football Song”

Drakkar Klose: “Devastated” by Joey Bada$$

Felice Herrig def. Cortney Casey via split decision (29-28, 28-29, 29-28)

Felice Herrig: “Blinded By the Light” by Manfred Mann’s Earth Band

Cortney Casey: “Living Dead Girl” by Rob Zombie

Amanda Cooper def. Angela Magana via TKO (strikes) – Round 2, 4:34

Amanda Cooper: “Detroit Rock City” by Kiss

Angela Magana: Revolutionary anthem of Puerto Rico by Danny Rivera & Lola Rodriguez De Tito

Abdul Razak Alhassan def. Sabah Homasi via TKO (punches) – Round 1, 4:21

Abdul Razak Alhassan: “Kakai” by Shatta Wale

Sabah Homasi: “Go Get It” by T.I.

Dominick Reyes def. Jeremy Kimball via submission (rear-naked choke) – Round 1, 3:39

Dominick Reyes: “Congratulations” by Post Malone feat. Quavo

Jeremy Kimball: “You Can’t Stop Me” by Andy Mineo

Justin Willis def. Allen Crowder via knockout (punches) – Round 1, 2:33

Justin Willis: “DNA/Till I Collapse” by Kendrick Lamar/Eminem

Allen Crowder: “Hail To the King” by Avenged Sevenfold

For complete coverage of UFC 218, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

The Blue Corner is MMAjunkie‘s official blog and is edited by Mike Bohn.

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UFC 218 bonuses: Amazing night forces two 'Fight of the Night' awards

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DETROIT – How in the heck are you supposed to pick between Eddie Alvarez vs. Justin Gaethje and Yancy Medeiros vs. Alex Oliveira for “Fight of the Night” awards? You don’t.

Alvarez, Gaethje, Medeiros and Oliveira each earned $50,000 bonuses for their performances at Saturday’s UFC 218 event. With two “Fight of the Night” awards issued, there were no “Performance of the Night” honors given.

UFC officials announced the winners following the event, which MMAjunkie attended.

“The Ultimate Fighter 26” coaches Alvarez (29-5 MMA, 4-2 UFC) and Gaethje (18-1 MMA, 1-1 UFC) met in a highly anticipated main-event matchup they each said was to determine the baddest dude in the company. The contest lived up to the hype, with both men just digging into the pocket and swinging. In the end, Alvarez’s body shots took their toll, and a big knee sealed the deal in the third round, sending Gaethje crashing to the canvas for the first loss of his career. Still, both men cased in an extra $50,000 for the instant classic.

Medeiros (15-4 MMA, 6-4 UFC) and Oliveira (17-5-1 MMA, 7-3 UFC) faced off in a thrilling preliminary bout, with both men enjoying moments of success where it appeared the other fighter was done. However, they both pushed through the troubles to put on a blood-soaked show of bravery that only ended when a Medeiros barrage finally ended Oliveira’s night two minutes into the third frame.

UFC 218 took place Saturday at the new Little Caesars Arena in downtown Detroit and was the UFC’s first event in Michigan since UFC 123 in 2010. The main card aired live on pay-per-view following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass.

For more on UFC 218, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC 218 results: Yancy Medeiros TKOs Alex Oliveira after comeback in ridiculous bloody scrap

Yancy Medeiros broke something in Alex Oliveira, and not just his nose.

After more than two rounds of raucous back-and-forth action in which both fighters were badly hurt, Oliveira (17-5-1 MMA, 7-3 UFC) winced and wilted, and Medeiros (15-4 MMA, 6-4 UFC) closed the slow at the 2:02 mark of the final frame.

The welterweight bout was part of the preliminary card of today’s UFC 218 event at the new Little Caesars Arena in downtown Detroit. It aired on FS1 following additional prelims on UFC Fight Pass and ahead of a main card on pay-per-view.

Oliveira had Medeiros out on his feet at several points in the first, chasing the Hawaiian around the octagon with right hands. Early on, Oliveira prioritized body work with kicks, allowing up to move upstairs and catch Medeiros clean.

Medeiros repayed the charges with a left straight that briefly dropped Oliveira to the mat and busted his nose. But as the first round came to a close, it was Medeiros that was holding on for dear life as Oliveira pounded away.

The only problem for Oliveira was, Medeiros simply wouldn’t quit.

As the second frame got underway, Medeiros again found his left hand and caught Oliveira coming in. For the first time, Oliveira started to backpedal, on the defensive. Medeiros seized the initiative with body work. And when Oliveira dove for a takedown, he reversed and unleashed hellacious elbows from mount position.

Oliveira had one last dash in the third round, chasing Medeiros around the cage with more right hands. A pair of suplexes put the Brazilian in top position. But the pace of his footwork had clearly caught up, because Medeiros spun out of back control and escaped submission danger.

When Oliveira exploded back to his feet, he backpedaled for no apparent reason. Not wasting a moment, Medeiros gave chase and fired off a flurry of punches. Oliveira dropped to the mat, seemingly as much from the cumulation of blows than one particular event.

It was a triumphant turnaround and sure bonus-winner for Medeiros, who’s now won three straight. Since returning to the welterweight division, Oliveira is now 2-1 with one no contest.

Up-to-the-minute UFC 218 results include:

For complete coverage of UFC 218, check out the UFC Events section of the site.

(MMAjunkie’s Matt Erickson and Mike Bohn contributed to this report on site in Detroit.)

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Source: MMA Junkie

Alex Oliveira wants to knock out Yancy Medeiros at UFC 218, then hit Colby Covington in the face

Add Alex Oliveira to the list of Brazilians who’d like to teach Colby Covington a lesson about respect toward a nation.

Oliveira (17-4-1 MMA, 7-2 UFC) has a more immediate challenge ahead of him, as he prepares to meet Yancy Medeiros (14-4 MMA, 5-4 UFC) at Saturday’s UFC 218. And, following a tradition the Brazilian “Cowboy” has kept throughout his career, Oliveira’s not about to hand-pick who comes next should he win. But Oliveira would, of course, welcome the possibility of facing a ranked opponent.

If that person happens to be Covington (13-1 MMA, 8-1 UFC), who’s ranked No. 5 in the latest USA TODAY Sports/MMAjunkie MMA welterweight rankings? Well, that’s just two birds with one stone.

“I just want to hit him in the face, that’s it,” Oliveira told MMAjunkie. “Not just me, but many Brazilians want to. Even Americans don’t like what he did. To go into someone’s country and do what he did? It’s one thing to talk about your opponent, but to talk about the country? That’s just disrespectful to me – and to many other fighters.”

Oliveira, of course, refers to the not-so-flattering remarks made by Covington about Brazil and its people during and after a visit to Sao Paulo for a UFC Fight Night 119 bout with Demian Maia. Covington’s attacks toward the country have elicited all sorts of reactions from Brazilian fighters, from classic callouts to boomerang attacks.

While clearly peeved, Oliveira’s investment in the matchup is limited. First off, he’d be happy if basically any of his Brazilian peers got their crack at Covington. And then there’s the fact that he must first get past Medeiros, whom he meets in an FS1-televised preliminary bout at Little Caesar’s Arena in Detroit.

But Oliveira isn’t particularly worried about that, either. While he likes Medeiros’ fighting style, he believes his opponent is in for a rough ride. If Medeiros chooses to trade, Oliveira says, that’s great. If he wants to try to take it to the fence, that’s fine, too. Whatever happens, he believes his “heavy hand” will find a way.

“I don’t simply want to – I will knock him out,” Oliveira said.

Which is not to say Oliveira’s going to become reckless in his pursuit of a finish. The example of that balance can be seen in Oliveira’s most recent outing, a “Performance of the Night” win over Ryan LaFlare. While Oliveira was the winner with a second-round knockout, it involved overcoming a tough first frame in the mat.

For an outside viewer, it may have looked like the Brazilian was struggling with LaFlare’s wrestling. But, on his end, Oliveira was simply glad to implement a lesson he learned the hard way.

“I learned that in my fight with Donald Cerrone: You can’t go in there desperate to win the fight, desperate to finish or to brawl,” Oliveira said. “We have 15 minutes in there, you’ve got to stay calm. It’s what I did with LaFlare. He didn’t get anything done on top. I knew he’d be tired in the first round.

“He’d be back for the second, and I’d be in one piece. That’s it. Whenever he went in, which he did, he’d get a hard message.”

Oliveira thinks a similar fate might be in store for Medeiros: a second-round knockout. If that pans out, it will mean a fifth win among Oliveira’s six most recent outings – the remaining result was a no-contest opposite Tim Means, whom Oliveira would go on to submit later.

The Brazilian’s solid octagon record, which also features two post-fight bonuses, is made more impressive by the fact Oliveira has kept an active schedule of at least three octagon showings a year. Still, Oliveira doesn’t ask for much. As he said, he wouldn’t mind getting a crack at a higher-ranked opponent – or Covington.

But, ultimately, these are just bonuses.

“I want to stay active and keep fighting, because I never stop training,” Oliveira said. “If they give me a fight, right after, in Belem (UFC Fight Night 125, on Feb. 3), I’ll be incredibly happy. It’s been many years since I’ve been able to spend Christmas at home. This year, I will be able to. To be able to start off the year with a fight? Right on.”

For more on UFC 218, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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UFC 218 pre-event facts: Champ Max Holloway's 'Blessed Era' coming together nicely

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The UFC heads to Michigan for the first time in more than seven years on Saturday with UFC 218, which takes place at Little Caesars Arena in Detroit with a main card on pay-per-view following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass.

After the original main event fell apart, a featherweight championship rematch headlines the card. Reigning titleholder Max Holloway (18-3 MMA, 14-3 UFC) looks to repeat his third-round TKO of Jose Aldo (26-3 MMA, 8-2 UFC) at UFC 212 in June, while the Brazilian attempts to become just the third three-time titleholder in company history.

For more on the numbers behind the loaded UFC 218 lineup, check below for 75 pre-event facts.

* * * *

Main event

Max Holloway

Holloway is one of three fighters in UFC history to win the undisputed featherweight title, along with Aldo and Conor McGregor.

Holloway is one of two Hawaiian-born champions in UFC history. B.J. Penn also accomplished the feat.

Holloway competes in his 17th UFC featherweight bout, the most appearances in divisional history.

Holloway, 25, becomes the youngest fighter to make 18 UFC appearances.

Holloway, at 23, became the youngest fighter in UFC history to earn 10 victories with the organization at UFC Fight Night 74 in August.

Holloway enters the event on an 11-fight winning streak. He hasn’t suffered a defeat since August 2013.

Holloway’s 11-fight winning streak in UFC competition is third longest among active fighters in the company behind Demetrious Johnson (13) and Georges St-Pierre (13).

Holloway’s 10-fight UFC winning streak in featherweight competition is the longest active streak in the division.

Max Holloway

Holloway’s 13 victories in UFC featherweight competition are the most in divisional history.

Holloway’s eight stoppage victories in UFC featherweight competition are the most in divisional history.

Holloway’s six knockout victories in UFC featherweight competition are tied with McGregor for most in divisional history.

Holloway’s eight knockdowns landed in UFC featherweight competition are most in divisional history.

Holloway is the only fighter in UFC/WEC featherweight history to land 100 or more significant strikes in four separate fights.

Holloway is one of four fighters in UFC history to land 100 or more significant strikes in five separate fights. Michael Bisping, T.J. Dillashaw and Joanna Jedrzejczyk also accomplished the feat.

Holloway’s submission of Cub Swanson at the 3:58 mark of Round 3 at UFC on FOX 15 is the second latest submission ever in a three-round UFC featherweight bout behind Charles Rosa’s submission of Sean Soriano at UFC Fight Night 59.

Jose Aldo

Aldo is the only two-time UFC featherweight titleholder in history and one of seven overall in company history to have two reigns in a single weight class.

Aldo can join Randy Couture as the only fighters in UFC history with three title reigns in a single weight class.

Aldo is 1-2 in his past three fights after going undefeated for more than a decade.

Aldo competes in his 19th UFC/WEC featherweight bout, the second most appearances in combined divisional history behind Swanson (21).

Aldo’s 16 victories in UFC/WEC featherweight competition are the most in combined divisional history.

Aldo’s 15-fight UFC/WEC winning streak before losing to McGregor at UFC 194 is the second longest in the combined history of the two organizations behind Anderson Silva (16).

Aldo’s nine stoppage victories in UFC/WEC featherweight competition are the most in combined divisional history.

Jose Aldo

Aldo’s eight knockdowns landed in UFC/WEC featherweight competition are tied for second most in combined divisional history behind Jeremy Stephens (nine).

Aldo has landed 86.3 percent (138 of 160) leg-kick attempts in his UFC/WEC career.

Aldo defends 92.3 percent (84 of 91) of opponent takedown attempts in UFC/WEC featherweight competition, the highest rate in combined divisional history.

Aldo has suffered all three of his career losses by stoppage. That includes two knockout losses in UFC competition.

Aldo absorbed 104 significant strikes in his loss to Holloway at UFC 212, the most of his 18-fight UFC/WEC career. His previous high was 79 against Frankie Edgar at UFC 200.

Co-main event

Alistair Overeem

Alistair Overeem (43-15 MMA, 8-4 UFC) is 7-1 in his past eight UFC appearances dating back to December 2014.

Overeem has earned 38 of his 43 career victories by stoppage. Of his 21 career knockout wins, 12 stemmed from either a kick or knee strike.

Overeem lands 73.2 percent of his significant strike attempts in UFC competition, the highest rate in company history.

Overeem has been on the losing end of the third and fourth largest statistical comeback finishes in UFC heavyweight history. He out-landed Antonio Silva by 30 significant strikes before being knocked out at UFC 156 and out-landed Travis Browne by 27 significant strikes before his demise at UFC Fight Night 26.

Overeem’s 10 knockout losses in MMA competition are the most of any active member on the UFC roster.

Francis Ngannou

Francis Ngannou’s (10-1 MMA, 5-0 UFC) five-fight winning streak in UFC heavyweight competition is tied with Stipe Miocic for the longest active streak in the division.

Ngannou’s five-fight stoppage streak in UFC competition is tied with Miocic and Mairbek Taisumov the longest among active fighters.

Ngannou is one of three heavyweights in UFC history to post a five-fight stoppage streak. Ricco Rodriguez and Junior Dos Santos also accomplished the feat.

Ngannou has earned all 10 of his career victories by stoppage.

Ngannou absorbs just 1.53 significant strikes per minute in UFC heavyweight competition, the best rate among active fighters in the division.

Henry Cejudo

Henry Cejudo (11-2 MMA, 5-2 UFC) is one of three Olympic gold medalists to fight in the UFC, along with Kevin Jackson and Mark Schultz. He accomplished the feat in freestyle wrestling at the 2008 Summer Olympics.

Cejudo is the only Olympic gold medalist to fight in the UFC since the organization was purchased by parent company Zuffa.

Cejudo is the only Olympic gold medalist to fight for a UFC championship in modern UFC history.

Sergio Pettis (16-2 MMA, 7-2 UFC), along with his older brother Anthony Pettis, are one of 18 pairs of siblings to compete under the UFC banner.

Pettis is 4-1 since he dropped to the UFC flyweight division in March 2015.

Pettis’ four-fight UFC winning streak in flyweight competition is the third longest active streak in the division behind champ Johnson (13) and Joseph Benavidez (six).

Pettis has earned all seven of his UFC victories by decision.

Pettis defends 68.3 percent of all opponent significant strike attempts in UFC flyweight competition, the second-best rate in divisional history behind Johnson (68.7 percent).

Eddie Alvarez

Eddie Alvarez (28-5 MMA, 3-2 UFC) is the only fighter in MMA history to win titles under the UFC and Bellator banners.

Alvarez’s 128-day UFC lightweight title reign, ended by McGregor at UFC 205, was the shortest of any champion in divisional history.

Justin Gaethje (18-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC) enters the event on an 18-fight winning streak. He hasn’t suffered a defeat in his more than six-year career.

Gaethje’s 18-fight MMA winning streak is third longest among active UFC fighters behind Khabib Nurmagomedov (24) and Jimmie Rivera (20).

Gaethje had earned 16 of his 18 career victories by stoppage. He’s finished 16 of those wins by knockout.

Tecia Torres

Tecia Torres’ (9-1 MMA, 5-1 UFC) competes in her seventh UFC strawweight bout, tied for the second appearances in divisional history behind Joanna Jedrzejczyk (nine).

Torres’ five victories in UFC strawweight competition are tied with champ Rose Namajunas for second most in divisional history behind Jedrzejczyk (eight).

Torres’ two-fight UFC winning streak in strawweight competition is tied for the third longest active streak in the division behind Felice Herrig (three) and Cynthia Calvillo (three).

Torres defends 72.3 percent of all opponent significant strike attempts in UFC strawweight competition, the best rate in divisional history.

Michelle Waterson (14-5 MMA, 2-1 UFC) has earned 12 of her 14 career victories by stoppage. Both of her UFC wins are by submission.

Waterson’s six submission attempts in UFC strawweight competition are tied for third most in divisional history behind Cynthia Calvillo (eight) and Claudia Gadelha (seven).

Preliminary card

Charles Oliveira

Charles Oliveira (22-7 MMA, 10-7 UFC) was successful in his return to the UFC lightweight division when he submitted Will Brooks at UFC 210. He’s 3-3 in the organization at 155 pounds.

Oliveira has earned nine of his 10 UFC victories by submission.

Oliveira’s nine submission victories in UFC competition are tied with Nate Diaz and Demian Maia for second most in company history behind Royce Gracie (10).

Oliveira’s six submission victories in UFC featherweight competition are the most in divisional history.

Oliveira is one of two fighters in UFC history to earn submission victories with six different techniques. Frank Mir also accomplished the feat.

Oliveira is the only fighter in UFC history to earn a calf-slicer submission victory. He accomplished the feat against Eric Wisely at UFC on FOX 2.

Oliveira has earned 10 fight-night bonuses in his UFC career. His six bonuses for UFC featherweight bouts are tied with McGregor for most in divisional history.

Paul Felder (14-3 MMA, 6-3 UFC) has earned nine of his 14 career victories by knockout.

Felder is one of four fighters in UFC history to earn a knockout victory stemming from a spinning backfist. He accomplished the feat at UFC 182.

Alex Oliveira

Alex Oliveira (17-3-1 MMA, 7-2 UFC) is 5-1 (with one no-contest) in UFC welterweight competition.

Oliveira has earned 14 of his 17 career victories by stoppage. That includes five of his seven UFC wins.

Oliveira absorbs just 1.44 signifiant strikes per minute in UFC welterweight competition, the least among active fighters in the weight class.

Yancy Medeiros (14-4 MMA, 5-4 UFC) is 2-0 since he moved up to the UFC welterweight division in September 2016.

Felice Herrig

Felice Herrig’s (13-6 MMA, 4-1 UFC) four victories in UFC strawweight competition are tied for fourth most in divisional history behind Jedrzejczyk (eight), Namajunas (five) and Torres (five).

Herrig’s three-fight UFC winning streak in strawweight competition is tied with Calvillo for the longest active streak in the division.

Herrig has earned eight of her 13 career victories by decision.

Herrig’s submission of Kailin Curran at the 1:59 mark of Round 1 at UFC on FOX 20 marked the second-fastest stoppage in UFC strawweight history. Maryna Moroz holds the record with a 90-second win at UFC Fight Night 64.

Cortney Casey (6-4 MMA, 2-3 UFC) competes in her seven UFC strawweight bout, tied for second most appearances in divisional history behind Jedrzejczyk (nine).

Casey’s two fight-night bonuses for UFC strawweight bouts are tied for second most in divisional history behind Jedrzejczyk (three).

Dominick Reyes

Dominick Reyes (7-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC) has earned six of his seven career victories by first-round stoppage.

Reyes’ 29-second knockout of Joachim Christensen are UFC Fight Night 112 marked the second fastest stoppage by any debuting light heavyweight in UFC history behind Ryan Jimmo’s seven-second win at UFC 149.

Angela Magana (11-8 MMA, 0-2 UFC) enters the event on a four-fight losing skid. She hasn’t earned a victory since August 2011.

For more on UFC 218, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

FightMetric research analyst and live statistics producer Michael Carroll contributed to this story. Follow him on Twitter @MJCflipdascript.

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Source: MMA Junkie

UFC 218 lineup features 13 fights and featherweight title on the line in return to Detroit

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With an amended main event rematch, the lineup is set for next month’s UFC 218 pay-per-view in Michigan.

UFC 218 takes place Dec. 2 at the new Little Caesars Arena in downtown Detroit, and it’s the UFC’s first event in Michigan since UFC 123 in 2010. The main card airs live on pay-per-view following prelims on FS1 and UFC Fight Pass.

In the main event, featherweight champion Max Holloway (18-3 MMA, 14-3 UFC), who’s No. 1 in the USA TODAY Sports/MMAjunkie MMA 145-pound rankings (and No. 8 pound-for-pound), looks to defend his title for the first time when he meets former champ Jose Aldo (26-3 MMA, 8-2 UFC) in a rematch. Holloway was supposed to fight Frankie Edgar (22-5-1 MMA, 16-5-1 UFC) before Edgar pulled out with an injury.

The co-main event could serve as a title-eliminator in the heavyweight division. No. 2-ranked Alistair Overeem (43-15 MMA, 8-4 UFC) takes on No. 9 Francis Ngannou (10-1 MMA, 5-0 UFC) in a battle of heavy-handed strikers.

Rounding out the main card, Henry Cejudo (11-2 MMA, 5-2 UFC) meets Sergio Pettis (16-2 MMA, 7-2 UFC) at flyweight; Justin Gaethje (18-0 MMA, 1-0 UFC) takes on former lightweight champ Eddie Alvarez (28-5 MMA, 3-2 UFC) in a fight between current “TUF” coaches; and strawweight Tecia Torres (9-1 MMA, 5-1 UFC) meets Michelle Waterson (14-5 MMA, 2-1 UFC).

The featured bout on the preliminary card is at lightweight. Paul Felder (14-3 MMA, 6-3 UFC) takes on Charles Oliveira (22-7 MMA, 10-7 UFC), who replaced an injured Al Iaquinta.

The full “UFC 218: Holloway vs. Aldo” card now includes:

MAIN CARD (Pay-per-view, 10 p.m. ET)

  • Champ Max Holloway vs. Jose Aldo – for featherweight title
  • Francis Ngannou vs. Alistair Overeem
  • Henry Cejudo vs. Sergio Pettis
  • Eddie Alvarez vs. Justin Gaethje
  • Tecia Torres vs. Michelle Waterson

PRELIMINARY CARD (FS1, 8 p.m. ET)

PRELIMINARY CARD (UFC Fight Pass, 6:15 p.m. ET)

For more on UFC 218, check out the UFC Rumors section of the site.

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Source: MMA Junkie

Alex Davis: Hype always has been part of fight game – but no need to be jerks about it

Looking to attract fans and hype up your image has always been part of the fight game.

Even before MMA, Muhammad Ali talked smack about everything and everyone. I remember many different entertaining fighters who would put on a display before the fight. Who remembers Genki Sudo and his theatrics? They were entertaining, they were positive and they had a meaning to them.

And who remembers when Melvin Manhoef would come in held on a leash by his trainer? How about James Te Huna,  when he and his corners came out to a UFC fight dressed as the Men in Black, dancing and everything?

In the UFC, Rebook put an end to those things.

And then there have always been the talkers. I remember I was at a Cage Warriors event in England back in the day. Ex-UFC champ Michael Bisping fought and caught his opponent in an armbar. He already talked crap way back then. And it was simply him; he wasn’t forcing anything, he just said what came into his head. It was natural. Or Phil Baroni? The “New York Bad Ass” had always been arrogant. Or Chael Sonnen, who was always articulate and intelligent – even when he talk badly about Brazil. And, of course, UFC lightweight champ Conor McGregor: universal smack master.

But not everyone can do this in a smart and intelligent way.

We are starting to see guys try to pick up from McGregor’s example. They pick up the mic after the fight and act like complete jerks. All you hear is rubbish coming out of them. They are simply trying to build hype, get their names out there, get a connection with the public. But I see this is starting to go in a very negative direction.

These guys are watched by millions of people, including millions of kids and teenagers. As in every other sport, they have big followings. The kids tend to emulate them – to talk, walk and dress like they do. Now I wonder: Is this how we want this sport to go mainstream? As a bunch of punks cursing each other?

Is this really the way to make the sport of MMA go to the next level?

MMA is still considered a bloodsport by many – “human cockfighting.” Those who understand it know that it is, really, a combat sport engaged in by very high level masters in the art of fighting. Of course, as a combat sport, there will always be animosity between opponents. They are going to fight you, you know. But it seems to me that we are overdoing our attempts to gain recognition in a very negative way. I think that each individual has his own charisma. Each person and fighter is different.

“Brazilian Cowboy” Alex Oliveira can’t speak enough English to say bad things about anyone even if he wanted to. But he comes out dancing and happy, so people love him. And how about Junior Albini? He isn’t even trying. He came out unintentionally with his shorts rolled up like diapers, but he made the headlines.

I loved what UFC strawweight champion Rose Namajunas said after she took the title from Joanna Jedrzejczyk at UFC 217: enough negativity. UFC middleweight champion Georges St-Pierre is one of the biggest stars in the sport, but I have never seen him being disrespectful toward anything.

They are proof that you do not need to be a jerk to promote yourself.

Sure, as I said before: This is fighting. We get it. You do not have to be in love with your opponents, actual or future. But if your sole modus operandi is to badmouth people, most likely you will end up having an adverse effect on your image. I am looking down the road and I can foresee a time when we will get tired of this. When it will go full circle and we will again appreciate athletes for what they can do inside the ring.

A little entertainment will always be welcome. We are all humans, after all. But how about putting some imagination into it, as it’s been done ages before our time?

Alex Davis is a lifelong practitioner of martial arts and a former Brazilian judo champion. A founding member of American Top Team, Davis currently oversees the careers of a number of prominent Brazilian fighters, including Edson Barboza, Luiz Cane, Rousimar Palhares, Antonio Silva and Thiago Tavares, among others. Davis is a frequent contributor to MMAjunkie and shares his current views on the sport built through his perspectives that date back to the Brazilian roots of modern MMA.

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Source: MMA Junkie